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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - KUGELHELM - ENLISTED MAN - FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT 26 OR FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 35 - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – KUGELHELM – ENLISTED MAN – FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT 26 OR FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 35

    SKU: 33-356 XKGJT

    $3,995.00 $3,450.00

    PRUSSIA – KUGELHELM – ENLISTED MAN – FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT 26 OR FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 35.

    It is an enlisted man’s (EM) Feld-Artillerie-Regiment (FAR) Nr 26 or Feld-Artillerie-Regiment Nr 35 Kugelhelm from Prussia. FAR Nr 26 was founded in 1872 and garrisoned at Verden. It was assigned to the X. Armeekorps. FAR 36 was created in 1890 and garrisoned at Deutsch-Eylau in West Prussia. It was assigned to the XX. Armeekorps.

    This is an extremely rare helmet from the early 1900s. I have only seen three in all of my years of collecting (two officers’ helmets and one enlisted man’s (EM) helmet – this one). [The wappen is identified as Figure 1.7 in Jim Turinetti’s Guide to Collecting the Headgear of the 1914 German Army, as well as his Buyer’s Guide. Figure l.7 is a variation of Figure 1.0]. The wappen features Prussia’s basic line-eagle with the initials FR for Friedrich Rex (König Friedrich der Große) with an outstanding bandeau on the eagle’s thigh/hip area inscribed with “COLBERG 1807,” in recognition of the defiant stance Feld-Artillerie-Regiment Nrs 26’s and 35’s ancestral units took against French forces in 1807. [Colberg/Kolberg: former German seaport in Pommern (Western Pomerania), Prussia, Germany, now, Kolobrzeg, Poland]. The honor banner was authorized for wear in 1899. As you can see, since the bandeau was only in existence for nineteen years, not many EM or NCO’s helmets were created. This plate and helmet configuration was worn by only 0.1 % of the Imperial German Army in 1914. The Eagle is found in only one size and was worn with a Reich’s kokarde on the helmet’s right side and a Prussian State kokarde on the left.

    The overall condition of the helmet body is good. NO extra holes are evident, although some slight denting appears on the helmet’s right rear. The surface has not been broken, and its black finish displays a deep luster. The helmet is in the Dienst (Duty) configuration with the leather chin strap that was worn in the field. These two regiments did NOT take a hair bush for parade, so the kugel (ball top) is not removable. The interior of the helmet is typical for this era’s EM helmets, featuring an attractive, supple, leather liner and the fingers (petals) for adjusting the fit.

    The kugelhelm was worn by FAR 26’s Batterie Nr 2. It might also have been worn by FAR35 Batteries Nr 1, 2, and 5. Three letters and the number 10 appear on the rear visor. Since FAR 26 was in Armeekorps (AK) X and FAR 35 was in AK XVII in 1905, and then AK XX in 1914, it is very possible that this helmet is from FAR 26, Batterie 2. The three letters might indicate some clothing-related organization for the AK X. Thus, it probably comes from the LESS-represented regiment. Being for a single FAR 26 Batterie makes it a rare bird indeed!

    This is a truly rare helmet that would be the crown of any serious helmet collection. 

    This is a consignment item.

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  • Sale! KUGELHELM - PRUSSIA - OFFICER - PRE-1897 - FELDARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 2/FELDARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 3 PARADE

    PRUSSIA – KUGELHELM – SENIOR NCO – PRE-1897 – FELDARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 2/FELDARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 3 PARADE

    SKU: 33-374 XKGJT

    $5,995.00 $4,495.00

    KUGELHELM – PRUSSIA – SNEIOR NCO – PRE-1897 – FELDARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 2/FELDARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 3 PARADE

    Today we are offering you a very rare kugelhelm from one of the Kingdom of Prussia’s two old-line Artillerie Regiments. It comes from either the 1. Pommerisches Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr 2 (FA Nr 2) or Feldartillerie-Regiment General Feldzeugmeister (1. Brandenburgisches) Nr 3 (FA Nr 3). [To give you a sense of the helmet’s rarity, it was used by a SINGLE Batterie in each regiment! FA Nr 2 (created in 1808), employed it in Batterie Nr 2, while FA Nr 3 (founded in 1816) used it in Batterie Nr 6]. This kugelhelm is for an officer from one of the two regiments, which only makes it MORE exceptional.

    The kugelhelm boasts a delightful leather body. Its condition is excellent, particularly when one considers that it was produced prior to 1897 (more about the date later on). Its furniture is all brass, including the early-style chin scales, its base, pearl ring, wappen, trichter, kugel, and trim. [The wappen is what indicates which regiments and batteries the kugelhelm represents]. This wappen features the “folded-wing” style. A three-part bandeau (banner) flows across the eagle’s wings and chest. Those banners or proclaim “Mit Gott Für Koenig und Vaterland.” An oval shield with the royal cypher “FRW” appears below the word “Koenig” in the center of the eagle’s chest, with another bandeau proclaiming “Colberg. 1807” beneath it. The Battle/Siege of Colberg took place from March to July 1807, when Napoleon’s French forces laid siege to the city. The siege proved unsuccessful and was considered a Prussian victory during the Napoleonic Wars.

    Since this is a pre 1897 helmet, the Prussian and Reich’s kokarden do NOT appear on either side. Instead, a Prussian officer’s kokarde is displayed on the wearer’s right side. This marvelous helmet’s final important detail is its handsome black parade bush, which is attached to a fine brass trichter. This helmet also comes with a non-dress kugel, so the new owner will be able to display the kugelhelm in either the parade or non-parade configuration. Having a parade bush and trichter in top condition is a real plus, but the addition of a kugel completes the presentation. [A small, but significant, detail is that the brass’s patina is very similar, meaning they have been in place for a long time].

    The kugelhelm’s interior displays a dark-brown, leather sweatband in fine condition, with an amazing brown silk (smooth, NOT ribbed) liner attached to it. [In my experience, ribbed silk liners tend to be more common, so smooth ones clearly were an option that officers could specify for their privately-purchased helmets. While this was a matter of taste, smooth silk liners tended to be the popular choice among Imperial German royalty and nobility]. What is particularly important: NO double holes appear under the silk liner where the wappen is attached. Also, all of the hardware is 100% original to the helmet.

    This desirable helmet would be most difficult to upgrade. Its parade bush and trichter set off the “Colberg. 1807″ quite attractively!

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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MEDAL - LANDER-KRIEGER-BUND (KYFFHÄUSER) - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MEDAL – LANDER-KRIEGER-BUND (KYFFHÄUSER)

    SKU: 01-863 XDG

    $75.00 $60.00

    This is a consignment item. The silver-toned post WW I veterans’ medal features the Kyffhäuserdenkmal on its obverse. The medal measures 1 ¾” x 2.” It is attached to an original black and white ribbon that has been folded and secured into a two-inch length. Its reverse reads “Für Verdienst im Kriegervereins Wesen” (For Distinguished Service in War Veterans’ Organization).


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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MITRE - 1900 CENTENNIAL FUND-RAISING  WITH GREEN, RED, AND WHITE PUSCHEL - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MITRE – 1900 CENTENNIAL FUND-RAISING WITH GREEN, RED, AND WHITE PUSCHEL

    SKU: 33-369 XJT

    $1,295.00 $500.00

    MITRE – 1900 CENTENNIAL FUND-RAISING WITH GREEN, RED, AND WHITE PUSCHEL

    Around the turn of the 20th Century, charitable fund-raising in Imperial Germany touched on its citizens’ patriotic fervor by employing a military theme. A popular offering was inexpensive copies of Mitres that had been worn by famous regiments. This is a copy of a Mitre worn in the mid-1700s. Based on its Puschel, I believe it was for by IR 18. It sports a black metal front plate with a Prussian Black Eagle holding a sword and a scepter, and the cypher “FR.” Its body is red with white piping and flames around the base. The rear flame displays a circular disk below it. Its interior features a strip of black leather and a fine cloth liner with a drawstring to adjust its size. The letters “XXVIk134″ are stamped on the cloth liner. The plush white Puschel is beautiful. It sports a red band and a green center. It is very unusual to find a Puschel with these Centennial pieces. It is a beautiful and rare copy of an early Mitre. This is a consignment item.

    The Grenadiermütze (Grenadier Cap) or Mitre style of headdress dates back to the 1600s and Frederick the Great. It was worn by numerous German Infanterie units throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th Centuries. The Mitre’s body was a tall cloth bag with white strips around its base and a large metal front plate. Leather pickelhauben replaced Mitres during the mid-1800s. By 1894, only three out of the hundreds of German Imperial Army Infanterie units still wore the Grenadier Mitre, and then it was only for parades or palace duty. These units were: the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß), the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment NR. 1 (KAGGR1), and the Schloß Garde Kompagnie (Palace Guard Company). It was quite an honor to have these distinctive headdresses.
    The Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) was established on 11 August 1688 and garrisoned in Potsdam, just outside of Berlin. In 1824, its Bataillon II’s enlisted men were authorized by Allerhöchste Kabinettsorder (Supreme Cabinet Order – A.K.O.) dated 30 March 1824 to wear the very distinctive and colorful headdress known as the Grenadiermütze or Mitre for parades and special occasions. On 10 August 1824, Bataillon I’s enlisted men also were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze. Only the enlisted members of these Bataillone wore this item for parade, while the remainder of the regiment still wore their normal day-to-day headgear with a white plume or bush for parade. The Mitre initially was reserved for enlisted men, but at parade on 26 March 1826 Bataillone I & II’s unmounted officers finally were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze style.
    In May 1843, Bataillon III (Füsilier) finally was authorized to wear a Grenadiermütze for parade. While their Grenadiermützen were similar to the ones worn by Bataillone I & II, their Grenadiermützen bodies were shorter, possessed a slightly different shape, and the grenades around their headbands were replaced by heraldic eagles.
    In January of 1889 the 3rd and 4th Companies were honored by the addition of the “SEMPER TALIS” (Ever-Following/Always Faithful/Always the Same) bandeaux to their Mitres and leather spiked helmets. (A.K.O. dated 27 January 1889). In either the summer of that year or May of 1890 the rest of Bataillon I and the Regimental staff were also authorized to wear them. The enlisted men’s bandeaux were made from brass, while those for the officers were made of German silver and their letters were sometimes colored in with red lacquer.
    On 9 February 1894 the EGRzuFUß troops of the 1st (Leib), 5th, and 9th Kompagnien were gifted by the Kaiser with new Grenadiermützen for parades. [At that time, these mounted companies’ officers, staff and adjutants still wore pickelhauben with white plumes (or black for the Füsiliers)]. By December 1894, all EGRzuFUß Kompagnien had received the new style of Mitre.
    The EGRzuFUß’s new Grenadiermütze was patterned after one worn by Frederick der Große’s Regimental Guard (Königlich Preußisches Regiments Garde Nr. 15, from 1753 to 1786). It was made from pressed or stamped, white, sheet metal and did not have a scaled metal chin strap. Bataillone I & II’s Mitres sported red cloth trim around their front plates, red cloth bodies with three white cloth strips running from peak to base (silver bullion for the officers), and the “Semper Talis” bandeaux. [This was unusual, since only Bataillon I and the Staff were authorized to wear this banner on their helmets]. The Fusilier Bataillon had a gold cloth body with white strips and the “Pro Gloria Et Patria” (For Glory and Country) inscription on the bandeau above the eagle.
    Initially, no chin strap was worn on the new Grenadiermütze; instead, the Mitre was held in place with a leather string that tied under the chin. This method did NOT keep the Grenadiermütze in place and it frequently fell off of the soldier’s head! In 1897, flat, scaled, metal, chin straps were authorized for the Grenadiermütze. Model 1891 chin strap posts were then added to the Grenadiermütze, with the wearer using the metal chin straps from his pickelhaube on his Grenadiermütze. After parade, the chin strap was removed, and the Grenadiermütze was stored in an oil cloth cover in the regimental storeroom. [More about this oil cloth cover will appear later in this special update].
    When the EGRzuFUß received their new Grenadiermützen in 1894, they turned their old ones over to the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regt.1 (KAGGR1). It appears that they made this transition between corresponding companies. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.
    [For more information on these two Mitres and loads of photos, see The Grenadier Mütze of the Imperial German Army by Jim Turinetti].

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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MITRE - 1900 CENTENNIAL FUND-RAISING EARLY 1700'S - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MITRE – 1900 CENTENNIAL FUND-RAISING EARLY 1700’S

    SKU: 33-370 XJT

    $895.00 $500.00

    Around the turn of the 20th Century, charitable fund-raising in Imperial Germany touched on its citizens’ patriotic fervor by employing a military theme. A popular offering was inexpensive copies of Mitres that had been worn by famous regiments. This is a copy of the Mitre worn by the Königliches Regiment in the early 1700s. Its body is all cloth with a metal, eight-pointed star with the Order of the Black Eagle on the front’s center. A metal crown sits above the star. Metal flames appear on either side, with a flaming bomb on the rear. The front and headband are made of red cloth, while the rear is made of blue cloth. The front is backed by blue cloth and three cloth strips run down the body’s back. It does NOT have a Puschel. Dirt smudges and a few moth holes are present, but the overall condition is fair-plus. The interior is all cloth, possibly burlap. The letters “IIA148/649″ and “XXVI161″ also appear. This is a beautiful and rare copy of an early Mitre. It is a consignment item.

    The Grenadiermütze (Grenadier Cap) or Mitre style of headdress dates back to the 1600s and Frederick the Great. It was worn by numerous German Infanterie units throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th Centuries. The Mitre’s body was a tall cloth bag with white strips around its base and a large metal front plate. Leather pickelhauben replaced Mitres during the mid-1800s. By 1894, only three out of the hundreds of German Imperial Army Infanterie units still wore the Grenadier Mitre, and then it was only for parades or palace duty. These units were: the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß), the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment NR. 1 (KAGGR1), and the Schloß Garde Kompagnie (Palace Guard Company). It was quite an honor to have these distinctive headdresses.
    The Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) was established on 11 August 1688 and garrisoned in Potsdam, just outside of Berlin. In 1824, its Bataillon II’s enlisted men were authorized by Allerhöchste Kabinettsorder (Supreme Cabinet Order – A.K.O.) dated 30 March 1824 to wear the very distinctive and colorful headdress known as the Grenadiermütze or Mitre for parades and special occasions. On 10 August 1824, Bataillon I’s enlisted men also were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze. Only the enlisted members of these Bataillone wore this item for parade, while the remainder of the regiment still wore their normal day-to-day headgear with a white plume or bush for parade. The Mitre initially was reserved for enlisted men, but at parade on 26 March 1826 Bataillone I & II’s unmounted officers finally were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze style.
    In May 1843, Bataillon III (Füsilier) finally was authorized to wear a Grenadiermütze for parade. While their Grenadiermützen were similar to the ones worn by Bataillone I & II, their Grenadiermützen bodies were shorter, possessed a slightly different shape, and the grenades around their headbands were replaced by heraldic eagles.
    In January of 1889 the 3rd and 4th Companies were honored by the addition of the “SEMPER TALIS” (Ever-Following/Always Faithful/Always the Same) bandeaux to their Mitres and leather spiked helmets. (A.K.O. dated 27 January 1889). In either the summer of that year or May of 1890 the rest of Bataillon I and the Regimental staff were also authorized to wear them. The enlisted men’s bandeaux were made from brass, while those for the officers were made of German silver and their letters were sometimes colored in with red lacquer.
    On 9 February 1894 the EGRzuFUß troops of the 1st (Leib), 5th, and 9th Kompagnien were gifted by the Kaiser with new Grenadiermützen for parades. [At that time, these mounted companies’ officers, staff and adjutants still wore pickelhauben with white plumes (or black for the Füsiliers)]. By December 1894, all EGRzuFUß Kompagnien had received the new style of Mitre.
    The EGRzuFUß’s new Grenadiermütze was patterned after one worn by Frederick der Große’s Regimental Guard (Königlich Preußisches Regiments Garde Nr. 15, from 1753 to 1786). It was made from pressed or stamped, white, sheet metal and did not have a scaled metal chin strap. Bataillone I & II’s Mitres sported red cloth trim around their front plates, red cloth bodies with three white cloth strips running from peak to base (silver bullion for the officers), and the “Semper Talis” bandeaux. [This was unusual, since only Bataillon I and the Staff were authorized to wear this banner on their helmets]. The Fusilier Bataillon had a gold cloth body with white strips and the “Pro Gloria Et Patria” (For Glory and Country) inscription on the bandeau above the eagle.
    Initially, no chin strap was worn on the new Grenadiermütze; instead, the Mitre was held in place with a leather string that tied under the chin. This method did NOT keep the Grenadiermütze in place and it frequently fell off of the soldier’s head! In 1897, flat, scaled, metal, chin straps were authorized for the Grenadiermütze. Model 1891 chin strap posts were then added to the Grenadiermütze, with the wearer using the metal chin straps from his pickelhaube on his Grenadiermütze. After parade, the chin strap was removed, and the Grenadiermütze was stored in an oil cloth cover in the regimental storeroom. [More about this oil cloth cover will appear later in this special update].
    When the EGRzuFUß received their new Grenadiermützen in 1894, they turned their old ones over to the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regt.1 (KAGGR1). It appears that they made this transition between corresponding companies. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.
    [For more information on these two Mitres and loads of photos, see The Grenadier Mütze of the Imperial German Army by Jim Turinetti].

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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MITRE - ENLISTED MAN - ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR III - FRIEDRICH der GROßE-STYLE - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MITRE – ENLISTED MAN – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR III – FRIEDRICH der GROßE-STYLE

    SKU: 33-364 XJT

    $4,695.00 $3,800.00

    MITRE – ENLISTED MAN – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR III – FRIEDRICH der GROßE-STYLE

    This is an Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß Bataillon Nr III Enlisted Men’s Mitre. It features the “Pro Gloria et Patria” bandeau on its ornate silver front plate. The cloth back is yellow with plain white strips for trim. Its interior reveals a narrow leather sweatband with a two-piece, red, cloth liner. The white cotton yarn Puschel displays a yellow center. No holes or stains mar its yellow wool body. This is a beautiful Mitre that was worn by only one Bataillon of one Regiment, or 0.1% of the army.
    A lovely addition to any helmet collection’s display is a military miniature displaying that helmet. Uniforms also complement a helmet, but they require much more space and staging.

    A well-painted military miniature can add that extra piece of information about the uniform when displaying cloth is NOT the answer. To that end, we are including four miniatures depicting Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß’s Füsiliers in their overcoats and yellow cloth-backed Mitres with this Mitre. The set includes two guards carrying rifles, a Fahnenträger (flag bearer) with a flag sporting a single battle streamer, and an officer with a sword. They are wearing the Füsilier Bataillon’s gold-cloth Mitres.

    This is a consignment item.

    The Grenadiermütze (Grenadier Cap) or Mitre style of headdress dates back to the 1600s and Frederick the Great. It was worn by numerous German Infanterie units throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th Centuries. The Mitre’s body was a tall cloth bag with white strips around its base and a large metal front plate. Leather pickelhauben replaced Mitres during the mid-1800s. By 1894, only three out of the hundreds of German Imperial Army Infanterie units still wore the Grenadier Mitre, and then it was only for parades or palace duty. These units were: the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß), the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment NR. 1 (KAGGR1), and the Schloß Garde Kompagnie (Palace Guard Company). It was quite an honor to have these distinctive headdresses.
    The Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) was established on 11 August 1688 and garrisoned in Potsdam, just outside of Berlin. In 1824, its Bataillon II’s enlisted men were authorized by Allerhöchste Kabinettsorder (Supreme Cabinet Order – A.K.O.) dated 30 March 1824 to wear the very distinctive and colorful headdress known as the Grenadiermütze or Mitre for parades and special occasions. On 10 August 1824, Bataillon I’s enlisted men also were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze. Only the enlisted members of these Bataillone wore this item for parade, while the remainder of the regiment still wore their normal day-to-day headgear with a white plume or bush for parade. The Mitre initially was reserved for enlisted men, but at parade on 26 March 1826 Bataillone I & II’s unmounted officers finally were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze style.

    In May 1843, Bataillon III (Füsilier) finally was authorized to wear a Grenadiermütze for parade. While their Grenadiermützen were similar to the ones worn by Bataillone I & II, their Grenadiermützen bodies were shorter, possessed a slightly different shape, and the grenades around their headbands were replaced by heraldic eagles.

    In January of 1889 the 3rd and 4th Companies were honored by the addition of the “SEMPER TALIS” (Ever-Following/Always Faithful/Always the Same) bandeaux to their Mitres and leather spiked helmets. (A.K.O. dated 27 January 1889). In either the summer of that year or May of 1890 the rest of Bataillon I and the Regimental staff were also authorized to wear them. The enlisted men’s bandeaux were made from brass, while those for the officers were made of German silver and their letters were sometimes colored in with red lacquer.
    On 9 February 1894 the EGRzuFUß troops of the 1st (Leib), 5th, and 9th Kompagnien were gifted by the Kaiser with new Grenadiermützen for parades. [At that time, these mounted companies’ officers, staff and adjutants still wore pickelhauben with white plumes (or black for the Füsiliers)]. By December 1894, all EGRzuFUß Kompagnien had received the new style of Mitre.

    The EGRzuFUß’s new Grenadiermütze was patterned after one worn by Frederick der Große’s Regimental Guard (Königlich Preußisches Regiments Garde Nr. 15, from 1753 to 1786). It was made from pressed or stamped, white, sheet metal and did not have a scaled metal chin strap. Bataillone I & II’s Mitres sported red cloth trim around their front plates, red cloth bodies with three white cloth strips running from peak to base (silver bullion for the officers), and the “Semper Talis” bandeaux. [This was unusual, since only Bataillon I and the Staff were authorized to wear this banner on their helmets]. The Fusilier Bataillon had a gold cloth body with white strips and the “Pro Gloria Et Patria” (For Glory and Country) inscription on the bandeau above the eagle.
    Initially, no chin strap was worn on the new Grenadiermütze; instead, the Mitre was held in place with a leather string that tied under the chin. This method did NOT keep the Grenadiermütze in place and it frequently fell off of the soldier’s head! In 1897, flat, scaled, metal, chin straps were authorized for the Grenadiermütze. Model 1891 chin strap posts were then added to the Grenadiermütze, with the wearer using the metal chin straps from his pickelhaube on his Grenadiermütze. After parade, the chin strap was removed, and the Grenadiermütze was stored in an oil cloth cover in the regimental storeroom. [More about this oil cloth cover will appear later in this special update].

    When the EGRzuFUß received their new Grenadiermützen in 1894, they turned their old ones over to the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regt.1 (KAGGR1). It appears that they made this transition between corresponding companies. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.

    [For more information on these two Mitres and loads of photos, see The Grenadier Mütze of the Imperial German Army by Jim Turinetti].

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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MITRE - NCO - MUSEUM COPY - PALACE GUARD - RUSSIAN-STYLE - SILVER-PLATED - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MITRE – NCO – MUSEUM COPY – PALACE GUARD – RUSSIAN-STYLE – SILVER-PLATED

    SKU: 33-365 XJT

    $3,495.00 $2,500.00

    MITRE – NCO – PRUSSIA – MUSEUM COPY – PALACE GUARD – RUSSIAN STYLE – SILVER-PLATED

    For gala events, the Preußische Garde Unteroffizier Kompagnie’s NCO’s wore Grenadiermützen like those worn by the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß’s (EGRzuFUß) Bataillone Nrs I & II. Just like the EGRzuFUß, this Preußische Garde Unteroffizier Kompagnie’s Mitre displays a front shield made of silver-plated sheet-metal that bears a high-relief Order of the Black Eagle beneath a large crown. The metal shield is backed with black cloth, while the Mitre’s cloth body is red with three white strips running from its top down to its headband. The white cloth border/headband around the Mitre’s base features three flaming silver grenades. One is positioned on either side to fasten the correct, arched, brass, chin scales to the Mitre, while the third one appears at the Mitre’s rear. The top device, or Puschel, is a leather knob covered with white colored wool that sports a black center like that worn on the pre-1894 EGRzuFUß’ Mitres. No kokarden are worn on the Mitre. The Mitre’s interior is similar to a pickelhaube’s interior, featuring a leather headband with leather petals. Each petal contains a hole through which a leather string was threaded and tied in order to adjust the fit for each wearer.

    This Mitre is in excellent condition, with NO moth holes or nips. This Mitre was worn by only 70 men, making it as rare as the Supravests worn by the Regiment der Guard du Corps’ Kürassiers (who also served as guards for the palace)! It is a consignment item.

    The Prussian Palace Guard has an interesting history. On 30 March 1829, a group of experienced NCO’s with a minimum of 14 years of active duty, preferably with combat experience and military decorations, was formed under the name of the “Preußische Garde Unteroffizier Kompagnie” to provide security for Prussia’s König, as well as his royal palace and gardens. In addition the company, in combination with the Leib-Gendarmerie, formed the König’s personal body guard. The company was composed of 70 members, 69 of the NCO’s and one commanding officer. The Prussian Palace Guard was garrisoned in Berlin, Charlottenburg and Potsdam. Cassel was added as another garrison site beginning in 1866. All members were attired in the historic uniforms from König Friedrich der Große’s time.

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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MITRE - ONE-YEAR-VOLUNTEER - ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I - FRIEDRICH der GROßE-STYLE - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MITRE – ONE-YEAR-VOLUNTEER – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I – FRIEDRICH der GROßE-STYLE

    SKU: 33-362 XJT

    $4,995.00 $3,800.00

    MITRE – ONE-YEAR-VOLUNTEER – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I – FRIEDRICH der GROßE-STYLE

    This is a privately-purchased, One-Year-Volunteer (OYV) or NCO’s Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß Bataillon Nr I or II Mitre. It boasts the “Semper Talis” bandeau on its ornate silver front plate. The cloth back is red with ornate white strips for trim. The Mitre’s interior features a wide leather sweatband with a two-piece, red, cloth liner. Its white cotton yarn Puschel displays a black center. No holes or stains mar its red wool body. This is a beautiful Mitre that was worn by two Bataillone of one Regiment, or just 0.2% of the Imperial German Army.

    Period photos of soldiers in their dress uniforms are often better sources of information than many of the reference books on the market, and provide a single snapshot of the information that is not hindered by a language barrier. To that end, we are including a studio photo of an Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß member wearing his Friedrich der Große-style Mitre. You will note that the man’s Puschel features a clear distinction between its white outer and black inner colors. Also, the man is NOT wearing chin scales on his Mitre. Based on his sword knot, he belongs to one of Bataillon II’s companies.

    This is a consignment item.

    The Grenadiermütze (Grenadier Cap) or Mitre style of headdress dates back to the 1600s and Frederick the Great. It was worn by numerous German Infanterie units throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th Centuries. The Mitre’s body was a tall cloth bag with white strips around its base and a large metal front plate. Leather pickelhauben replaced Mitres during the mid-1800s. By 1894, only three out of the hundreds of German Imperial Army Infanterie units still wore the Grenadier Mitre, and then it was only for parades or palace duty. These units were: the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß), the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment NR. 1 (KAGGR1), and the Schloß Garde Kompagnie (Palace Guard Company). It was quite an honor to have these distinctive headdresses.
    The Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) was established on 11 August 1688 and garrisoned in Potsdam, just outside of Berlin. In 1824, its Bataillon II’s enlisted men were authorized by Allerhöchste Kabinettsorder (Supreme Cabinet Order – A.K.O.) dated 30 March 1824 to wear the very distinctive and colorful headdress known as the Grenadiermütze or Mitre for parades and special occasions. On 10 August 1824, Bataillon I’s enlisted men also were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze. Only the enlisted members of these Bataillone wore this item for parade, while the remainder of the regiment still wore their normal day-to-day headgear with a white plume or bush for parade. The Mitre initially was reserved for enlisted men, but at parade on 26 March 1826 Bataillone I & II’s unmounted officers finally were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze style.

    In May 1843, Bataillon III (Füsilier) finally was authorized to wear a Grenadiermütze for parade. While their Grenadiermützen were similar to the ones worn by Bataillone I & II, their Grenadiermützen bodies were shorter, possessed a slightly different shape, and the grenades around their headbands were replaced by heraldic eagles.

    In January of 1889 the 3rd and 4th Companies were honored by the addition of the “SEMPER TALIS” (Ever-Following/Always Faithful/Always the Same) bandeaux to their Mitres and leather spiked helmets. (A.K.O. dated 27 January 1889). In either the summer of that year or May of 1890 the rest of Bataillon I and the Regimental staff were also authorized to wear them. The enlisted men’s bandeaux were made from brass, while those for the officers were made of German silver and their letters were sometimes colored in with red lacquer.

    On 9 February 1894 the EGRzuFUß troops of the 1st (Leib), 5th, and 9th Kompagnien were gifted by the Kaiser with new Grenadiermützen for parades. [At that time, these mounted companies’ officers, staff and adjutants still wore pickelhauben with white plumes (or black for the Füsiliers)]. By December 1894, all EGRzuFUß Kompagnien had received the new style of Mitre.

    The EGRzuFUß’s new Grenadiermütze was patterned after one worn by Frederick der Große’s Regimental Guard (Königlich Preußisches Regiments Garde Nr. 15, from 1753 to 1786). It was made from pressed or stamped, white, sheet metal and did not have a scaled metal chin strap. Bataillone I & II’s Mitres sported red cloth trim around their front plates, red cloth bodies with three white cloth strips running from peak to base (silver bullion for the officers), and the “Semper Talis” bandeaux. [This was unusual, since only Bataillon I and the Staff were authorized to wear this banner on their helmets]. The Fusilier Bataillon had a gold cloth body with white strips and the “Pro Gloria Et Patria” (For Glory and Country) inscription on the bandeau above the eagle.

    Initially, no chin strap was worn on the new Grenadiermütze; instead, the Mitre was held in place with a leather string that tied under the chin. This method did NOT keep the Grenadiermütze in place and it frequently fell off of the soldier’s head! In 1897, flat, scaled, metal, chin straps were authorized for the Grenadiermütze. Model 1891 chin strap posts were then added to the Grenadiermütze, with the wearer using the metal chin straps from his pickelhaube on his Grenadiermütze. After parade, the chin strap was removed, and the Grenadiermütze was stored in an oil cloth cover in the regimental storeroom. [More about this oil cloth cover will appear later in this special update].

    When the EGRzuFUß received their new Grenadiermützen in 1894, they turned their old ones over to the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regt.1 (KAGGR1). It appears that they made this transition between corresponding companies. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.

    [For more information on these two Mitres and loads of photos, see The Grenadier Mütze of the Imperial German Army by Jim Turinetti].

    In stock


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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MITRE - RUSSIAN-STYLE - ENLISTED MAN - ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I

    SKU: 33-358 XJT

    $5,495.00 $4,100.00

    MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I

    Our offering today is an Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) Battalion Nr 1 Russian-style enlisted men’s Mitre. Its metal front shield is made of brass plated sheet metal and bears a relief Order of the Black Eagle beneath a large crown. A bandeau inscribed with the words “SEMPER TALIS” sits above the crown. The metal shield is backed with dark-blue cloth for Bataillone I & II. The Mitre’s cloth body is red with three white strips extending from its top to the headband. The white cloth border/headband around the Mitre’s base features three flaming, brass grenades for Bataillone I & II. One is positioned on either side to fasten the correct arched, brass, chin scales to the Mitre, while the third one appears at the Mitre’s rear. [PLEASE NOTE: the Infanterie’s scaled metal pickelhauben chin straps were flat, NOT arched]. The top device, known as the Puschel, is a leather knob covered with white wool that sports a black center. No kokarden are worn on the Mitre.
    The Mitre’s interior is similar to that of a pickelhaube, featuring a leather headband with leather petals. Each petal contains a hole through which a leather string was threaded and tied in order to adjust the fit for each wearer.

    The Mitre’s condition is very good, overall, with no moth holes or nips. One black spot does appear on the lower part of the red cloth. This Mitre was only worn by one Bataillon of one regiment, or only 0.1% of the entire Imperial German Army. This is a consignment item.
    The Grenadiermütze (Grenadier Cap) or Mitre style of headdress dates back to the 1600s and Frederick the Great. It was worn by numerous German Infanterie units throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th Centuries. The Mitre’s body was a tall cloth bag with white strips around its base and a large metal front plate. Leather pickelhauben replaced Mitres during the mid-1800s. By 1894, only three out of the hundreds of German Imperial Army Infanterie units still wore the Grenadier Mitre, and then it was only for parades or palace duty. These units were: the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß), the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment NR. 1 (KAGGR1), and the Schloß Garde Kompagnie (Palace Guard Company). It was quite an honor to have these distinctive headdresses.
    The Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) was established on 11 August 1688 and garrisoned in Potsdam, just outside of Berlin. In 1824, its Bataillon II’s enlisted men were authorized by Allerhöchste Kabinettsorder (Supreme Cabinet Order – A.K.O.) dated 30 March 1824 to wear the very distinctive and colorful headdress known as the Grenadiermütze or Mitre for parades and special occasions. On 10 August 1824, Bataillon I’s enlisted men also were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze. Only the enlisted members of these Bataillone wore this item for parade, while the remainder of the regiment still wore their normal day-to-day headgear with a white plume or bush for parade. The Mitre initially was reserved for enlisted men, but at a parade on 26 March 1826 Bataillone I & II’s unmounted officers finally were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze style.

    In May 1843, Bataillon III (Füsilier) finally was authorized to wear a Grenadiermütze for parade. While their Grenadiermützen were similar to the ones worn by Bataillone I & II, their Grenadiermützen bodies were shorter, possessed a slightly different shape, and the grenades around their headbands were replaced by heraldic eagles.

    In January of 1889 the 3rd and 4th Companies were honored by the addition of the “SEMPER TALIS” (Ever-Following/Always Faithful/Always the Same) bandeaux to their Mitres and leather spiked helmets. (A.K.O. dated 27 January 1889). In either the summer of that year or May of 1890 the rest of Bataillon I and the Regimental staff were also authorized to wear them. The enlisted men’s bandeaux were made from brass, while those for the officers were made of German silver and their letters were sometimes colored in with red lacquer.
    On 9 February 1894 the EGRzuFUß troops of the 1st (Leib), 5th, and 9th Kompagnien were gifted by the Kaiser with new Grenadiermützen for parades. [At that time, these mounted companies’ officers, staff and adjutants still wore pickelhauben with white plumes (or black for the Füsiliers)]. By December 1894, all EGRzuFUß Kompagnien had received the new style of Mitre.

    The EGRzuFUß’s new Grenadiermütze was patterned after one worn by Frederick der Große’s Regimental Guard (Königlich Preußisches Regiments Garde Nr. 15, from 1753 to 1786). It was made from pressed or stamped, white, sheet metal and did not have a scaled metal chin strap. Bataillone I & II’s Mitres sported red cloth trim around their front plates, red cloth bodies with three white cloth strips running from peak to base (silver bullion for the officers), and the “Semper Talis” bandeaux. [This was unusual, since only Bataillon I and the Staff were authorized to wear this banner on their helmets]. The Fusilier Bataillon had a gold cloth body with white strips and the “Pro Gloria Et Patria” (For Glory and Country) inscription on the bandeau above the eagle.
    Initially, no chin strap was worn on the new Grenadiermütze; instead, the Mitre was held in place with a leather string that tied under the chin. This method did NOT keep the Grenadiermütze in place and it frequently fell off of the soldier’s head! In 1897, flat, scaled, metal, chin straps were authorized for the Grenadiermütze. Model 1891 chin strap posts were then added to the Grenadiermütze, with the wearer using the metal chin straps from his pickelhaube on his Grenadiermütze. After parade, the chin strap was removed, and the Grenadiermütze was stored in an oil cloth cover in the regimental storeroom. [More about this oil cloth cover will appear later in this special update].

    When the EGRzuFUß received their new Grenadiermützen in 1894, they turned their old ones over to the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regt.1 (KAGGR1). It appears that they made this transition between corresponding companies. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.

    [For more information on these two Mitres and loads of photos, see The Grenadier Mütze of the Imperial German Army by Jim Turinetti].

    In stock


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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MITRE - RUSSIAN-STYLE - ENLISTED MAN - ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I - KAISER ALEXANDER GARDE GRENADIER REGIMENT NR. 1 - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I – KAISER ALEXANDER GARDE GRENADIER REGIMENT NR. 1

    SKU: 33-360 XJT

    $5,695.00 $4,500.00

    MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – ERSTE GARDE REGIMENT ZU FUß BATAILLON NR I – KAISER ALEXANDER GARDE GRENADIER REGIMENT NR. 1

    This Mitre was originally issued to a soldier in the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) Bataillon Nr I, and then was passed along to a soldier in the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment Nr 1 Bataillon Nr I (KAGGR1) when the EGRzuFUß received their new Mitres in 1894. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.

    The front shield is made of brass-plated sheet metal that bears a relief Order of the Black Eagle beneath a large crown. The metal shield is backed with dark blue cloth for Bataillon Nr I. The Mitre’s cloth body is red, with three white strips running from its top down to the headband. The white cloth border/headband around the Mitre’s base features three flaming, brass grenades for Bataillone I & II. One is positioned on either side to fasten the correct arched, brass, chin scales to the Mitre, while the third one appears at the Mitre’s rear. [PLEASE NOTE: the Infanterie’s scaled metal pickelhauben chin straps were flat, NOT arched]. The top device, known as the Puschel, is a leather knob covered with white wool that sports a black center. No kokarden are worn on the Mitre.

    The Mitre’s interior is similar to that of a pickelhaube, featuring a leather headband with leather petals. Each petal contains a hole through which a leather string was threaded and tied in order to adjust the fit for each wearer.

    The Mitre’s condition is excellent, with no moth holes or nips. This Mitre was only worn by one Bataillon of one Regiment, or 0.1% of the Imperial German Army. Period photos of soldiers in their dress uniforms are often better sources of information than many of the reference books on the market, and provide a single snapshot of the information that is not hindered by a language barrier.

    To that end, we are including a photo of six Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadiers. You will note their cuffs display three buttons. They are all wearing the Kaiser Centennial Medal, which dates this photo as 1897 or later. On the photo’s reverse is a handwritten note identifying one of the Grenadiers (an “x” appears below the man on the far left, and an “x” appears at the beginning of the inscription). This particular man was born on 27 July 1876.

    This is a consignment item.

    The Grenadiermütze (Grenadier Cap) or Mitre style of headdress dates back to the 1600s and Frederick the Great. It was worn by numerous German Infanterie units throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th Centuries. The Mitre’s body was a tall cloth bag with white strips around its base and a large metal front plate. Leather pickelhauben replaced Mitres during the mid-1800s. By 1894, only three out of the hundreds of German Imperial Army Infanterie units still wore the Grenadier Mitre, and then it was only for parades or palace duty. These units were: the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß), the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment NR. 1 (KAGGR1), and the Schloß Garde Kompagnie (Palace Guard Company). It was quite an honor to have these distinctive headdresses.
    The Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) was established on 11 August 1688 and garrisoned in Potsdam, just outside of Berlin. In 1824, its Bataillon II’s enlisted men were authorized by Allerhöchste Kabinettsorder (Supreme Cabinet Order – A.K.O.) dated 30 March 1824 to wear the very distinctive and colorful headdress known as the Grenadiermütze or Mitre for parades and special occasions. On 10 August 1824, Bataillon I’s enlisted men also were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze. Only the enlisted members of these Bataillone wore this item for parade, while the remainder of the regiment still wore their normal day-to-day headgear with a white plume or bush for parade. The Mitre initially was reserved for enlisted men, but at parade on 26 March 1826 Bataillone I & II’s unmounted officers finally were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze style.

    In May 1843, Bataillon III (Füsilier) finally was authorized to wear a Grenadiermütze for parade. While their Grenadiermützen were similar to the ones worn by Bataillone I & II, their Grenadiermützen bodies were shorter, possessed a slightly different shape, and the grenades around their headbands were replaced by heraldic eagles.

    In January of 1889 the 3rd and 4th Companies were honored by the addition of the “SEMPER TALIS” (Ever-Following/Always Faithful/Always the Same) bandeaux to their Mitres and leather spiked helmets. (A.K.O. dated 27 January 1889). In either the summer of that year or May of 1890 the rest of Bataillon I and the Regimental staff were also authorized to wear them. The enlisted men’s bandeaux were made from brass, while those for the officers were made of German silver and their letters were sometimes colored in with red lacquer.

    On 9 February 1894 the EGRzuFUß troops of the 1st (Leib), 5th, and 9th Kompagnien were gifted by the Kaiser with new Grenadiermützen for parades. [At that time, these mounted companies’ officers, staff and adjutants still wore pickelhauben with white plumes (or black for the Füsiliers)]. By December 1894, all EGRzuFUß Kompagnien had received the new style of Mitre.

    The EGRzuFUß’s new Grenadiermütze was patterned after one worn by Frederick der Große’s Regimental Guard (Königlich Preußisches Regiments Garde Nr. 15, from 1753 to 1786). It was made from pressed or stamped, white, sheet metal and did not have a scaled metal chin strap. Bataillone I & II’s Mitres sported red cloth trim around their front plates, red cloth bodies with three white cloth strips running from peak to base (silver bullion for the officers), and the “Semper Talis” bandeaux. [This was unusual, since only Bataillon I and the Staff were authorized to wear this banner on their helmets]. The Fusilier Bataillon had a gold cloth body with white strips and the “Pro Gloria Et Patria” (For Glory and Country) inscription on the bandeau above the eagle.
    Initially, no chin strap was worn on the new Grenadiermütze; instead, the Mitre was held in place with a leather string that tied under the chin. This method did NOT keep the Grenadiermütze in place and it frequently fell off of the soldier’s head! In 1897, flat, scaled, metal, chin straps were authorized for the Grenadiermütze. Model 1891 chin strap posts were then added to the Grenadiermütze, with the wearer using the metal chin straps from his pickelhaube on his Grenadiermütze. After parade, the chin strap was removed, and the Grenadiermütze was stored in an oil cloth cover in the regimental storeroom. [More about this oil cloth cover will appear later in this special update].

    When the EGRzuFUß received their new Grenadiermützen in 1894, they turned their old ones over to the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regt.1 (KAGGR1). It appears that they made this transition between corresponding companies. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.

    [For more information on these two Mitres and loads of photos, see The Grenadier Mütze of the Imperial German Army by Jim Turinetti].

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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MITRE - RUSSIAN-STYLE - ENLISTED MAN - KAISER ALEXANDER GUARD GRENADIER REGIMENT 1  BATAILLON NR III (FÜSILIER) - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – KAISER ALEXANDER GUARD GRENADIER REGIMENT 1 BATAILLON NR III (FÜSILIER)

    SKU: 33-359 XJT

    $5,695.00 $4,950.00

    MITRE – RUSSIAN – STYLE  – ENLISTED MAN – KAISER ALEXANDER GUARD GRENADIER REGIMENT 1 BATAILLON NR III (FÜSILIER)

    This is a beautiful and very rare Mitre from Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regiment 1 Bataillon Nr III (Füsilier). The 1.Guard Grenadier Regiment, also known as the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regiment 1 (KAGGR1), was founded in 1814 and garrisoned in Berlin. [It must have been one of Kaiser Wilhelm II’s favorite regiments for it to be awarded the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß’s (EGRzuFUß) old Mitres when they received their new ones in 1894]! Its front shield is made of brass-plated sheet metal, and bears a relief Order of the Black Eagle underneath a large crown. The metal shield is backed with red cloth for Bataillon Nr III.

    The Mitre’s body is formed by an aluminum cone, then covered with red wool that sports three white strips running from its top down to the headband. The white cloth border/headband around the Mitre’s base boasts three brass heraldic eagles, one on either side, with the third attached at its rear. The correct, arched, brass, chin scales are attached to the Mitre by knurled knobs. [PLEASE NOTE: the Infanterie’s scaled metal pickelhauben chin straps were flat, NOT arched. Also note that the style, shape, and height of this Mitre are different from that of the EGRzuFUß’s Mitre].

    Its condition is excellent, with no moth holes or nips. Remember, this very rare Mitre was worn by only one Bataillon of one Regiment, or 0.1% of the Imperial German Army. It is a consignment item.

    The Grenadiermütze (Grenadier Cap) or Mitre style of headdress dates back to the 1600s and Frederick the Great. It was worn by numerous German Infanterie units throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th Centuries. The Mitre’s body was a tall cloth bag with white strips around its base and a large metal front plate. Leather pickelhauben replaced Mitres during the mid-1800s. By 1894, only three out of the hundreds of German Imperial Army Infanterie units still wore the Grenadier Mitre, and then it was only for parades or palace duty. These units were: the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß), the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment NR. 1 (KAGGR1), and the Schloß Garde Kompagnie (Palace Guard Company). It was quite an honor to have these distinctive headdresses.
    The Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) was established on 11 August 1688 and garrisoned in Potsdam, just outside of Berlin. In 1824, its Bataillon II’s enlisted men were authorized by Allerhöchste Kabinettsorder (Supreme Cabinet Order – A.K.O.) dated 30 March 1824 to wear the very distinctive and colorful headdress known as the Grenadiermütze or Mitre for parades and special occasions. On 10 August 1824, Bataillon I’s enlisted men also were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze. Only the enlisted members of these Bataillone wore this item for parade, while the remainder of the regiment still wore their normal day-to-day headgear with a white plume or bush for parade. The Mitre initially was reserved for enlisted men, but at parade on 26 March 1826 Bataillone I & II’s unmounted officers finally were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze style.

    In May 1843, Bataillon III (Füsilier) finally was authorized to wear a Grenadiermütze for parade. While their Grenadiermützen were similar to the ones worn by Bataillone I & II, their Grenadiermützen bodies were shorter, possessed a slightly different shape, and the grenades around their headbands were replaced by heraldic eagles.
    In January of 1889 the 3rd and 4th Companies were honored by the addition of the “SEMPER TALIS” (Ever-Following/Always Faithful/Always the Same) bandeaux to their Mitres and leather spiked helmets. (A.K.O. dated 27 January 1889). In either the summer of that year or May of 1890 the rest of Bataillon I and the Regimental staff were also authorized to wear them. The enlisted men’s bandeaux were made from brass, while those for the officers were made of German silver and their letters were sometimes colored in with red lacquer.

    On 9 February 1894 the EGRzuFUß troops of the 1st (Leib), 5th, and 9th Kompagnien were gifted by the Kaiser with new Grenadiermützen for parades. [At that time, these mounted companies’ officers, staff and adjutants still wore pickelhauben with white plumes (or black for the Füsiliers)]. By December 1894, all EGRzuFUß Kompagnien had received the new style of Mitre.

    The EGRzuFUß’s new Grenadiermütze was patterned after one worn by Frederick der Große’s Regimental Guard (Königlich Preußisches Regiments Garde Nr. 15, from 1753 to 1786). It was made from pressed or stamped, white, sheet metal and did not have a scaled metal chin strap. Bataillone I & II’s Mitres sported red cloth trim around their front plates, red cloth bodies with three white cloth strips running from peak to base (silver bullion for the officers), and the “Semper Talis” bandeaux. [This was unusual, since only Bataillon I and the Staff were authorized to wear this banner on their helmets]. The Fusilier Bataillon had a gold cloth body with white strips and the “Pro Gloria Et Patria” (For Glory and Country) inscription on the bandeau above the eagle.
    Initially, no chin strap was worn on the new Grenadiermütze; instead, the Mitre was held in place with a leather string that tied under the chin. This method did NOT keep the Grenadiermütze in place and it frequently fell off of the soldier’s head! In 1897, flat, scaled, metal, chin straps were authorized for the Grenadiermütze. Model 1891 chin strap posts were then added to the Grenadiermütze, with the wearer using the metal chin straps from his pickelhaube on his Grenadiermütze. After parade, the chin strap was removed, and the Grenadiermütze was stored in an oil cloth cover in the regimental storeroom. [More about this oil cloth cover will appear later in this special update].

    When the EGRzuFUß received their new Grenadiermützen in 1894, they turned their old ones over to the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regt.1 (KAGGR1). It appears that they made this transition between corresponding companies. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.

    [For more information on these two Mitres and loads of photos, see The Grenadier Mütze of the Imperial German Army by Jim Turinetti].

    In stock


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  • Sale! PRUSSIA - MITRE - RUSSIAN-STYLE - ENLISTED MAN - MUSEUM COPY - EGRzuFUß BATAILLON NR I - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    PRUSSIA – MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – MUSEUM COPY – EGRzuFUß BATAILLON NR I

    SKU: 33-361 XJT

    $3,495.00 $2,500.00

    MITRE – RUSSIAN-STYLE – ENLISTED MAN – MUSEUM COPY – EGRzuFUß BATAILLON NR I

    This beautiful museum copy of an important and VERY rare Mitre, an Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) Battalion Nr 1 Russian-style enlisted men’s Mitre, was made some time after the WW I. The craftsmanship in creating it is comparable to that of the original Mitres, and is very difficult to identify as a copy, even to an expert (such is the mark of EXCELLENT workmanship)! An original of this Mitre would cost THOUSANDS of dollars more.

    The front shield is made of brass-plated sheet metal that bears a relief Order of the Black Eagle beneath a large crown. A bandeau inscribed with the words “SEMPER TALIS” sits above the crown. The latter is the second configuration of the bandeaux found on the First Bataillon’s Mitres. The metal shield is backed with dark-blue cloth for Bataillone I & II. The Mitre’s cloth body is red, with three white strips running from its top down to the headband. The white cloth border/headband around the Mitre’s base features three flaming, brass grenades for Bataillone I & II. One is positioned on either side to fasten the correct arched, brass, chin scales to the Mitre, while the third one appears at the Mitre’s rear. [PLEASE NOTE: the Infanterie’s scaled metal pickelhauben chin straps were flat, NOT arched]. The top device, known as the Puschel, is a leather knob covered with red wool to identify it as a musician’s Mitre. No kokarden are worn on the Mitre.

    The Mitre’s interior is similar to that of a pickelhaube, featuring a leather headband with leather petals. Each petal contains a hole through which a leather string was threaded and tied in order to adjust the fit for each wearer.

    The Mitre’s condition is excellent, with no moth holes or nips. One black spot does appear on the red cloth’s lower section. This Mitre was only worn by one Bataillon of one Regiment, or 0.1% of the Imperial German Army.

    A lovely addition to any helmet collection’s display is a military miniature displaying that helmet. Uniforms also complement a helmet, but they require much more space and staging. A well-painted military miniature can add that extra piece of information about the uniform when displaying cloth is NOT the answer. To that end, we are including an outstanding single flat miniature of a Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment Fahnenträger wearing his Russian-style Mitre and carrying a flag with battle streamers for “Colberg 1807″ and “Pro Gloria et Patria.” Please pay special attention to the details on his shoulder strap, which sports Kaiser Alexander’s cypher. It is a beautiful piece of art. In addition, it provides a wealth of information about the Mitre and the uniform.

    This is a consignment item.

    The Grenadiermütze (Grenadier Cap) or Mitre style of headdress dates back to the 1600s and Frederick the Great. It was worn by numerous German Infanterie units throughout the 17th, 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th Centuries. The Mitre’s body was a tall cloth bag with white strips around its base and a large metal front plate. Leather pickelhauben replaced Mitres during the mid-1800s. By 1894, only three out of the hundreds of German Imperial Army Infanterie units still wore the Grenadier Mitre, and then it was only for parades or palace duty. These units were: the Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß), the Kaiser Alexander Garde Grenadier Regiment NR. 1 (KAGGR1), and the Schloß Garde Kompagnie (Palace Guard Company). It was quite an honor to have these distinctive headdresses.
    The Erste Garde Regiment zu Fuß (EGRzuFUß) was established on 11 August 1688 and garrisoned in Potsdam, just outside of Berlin. In 1824, its Bataillon II’s enlisted men were authorized by Allerhöchste Kabinettsorder (Supreme Cabinet Order – A.K.O.) dated 30 March 1824 to wear the very distinctive and colorful headdress known as the Grenadiermütze or Mitre for parades and special occasions. On 10 August 1824, Bataillon I’s enlisted men also were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze. Only the enlisted members of these Bataillone wore this item for parade, while the remainder of the regiment still wore their normal day-to-day headgear with a white plume or bush for parade. The Mitre initially was reserved for enlisted men, but at parade on 26 March 1826 Bataillone I & II’s unmounted officers finally were authorized to wear the Grenadiermütze style.

    In May 1843, Bataillon III (Füsilier) finally was authorized to wear a Grenadiermütze for parade. While their Grenadiermützen were similar to the ones worn by Bataillone I & II, their Grenadiermützen bodies were shorter, possessed a slightly different shape, and the grenades around their headbands were replaced by heraldic eagles.

    In January of 1889 the 3rd and 4th Companies were honored by the addition of the “SEMPER TALIS” (Ever-Following/Always Faithful/Always the Same) bandeaux to their Mitres and leather spiked helmets. (A.K.O. dated 27 January 1889). In either the summer of that year or May of 1890 the rest of Bataillon I and the Regimental staff were also authorized to wear them. The enlisted men’s bandeaux were made from brass, while those for the officers were made of German silver and their letters were sometimes colored in with red lacquer.

    On 9 February 1894 the EGRzuFUß troops of the 1st (Leib), 5th, and 9th Kompagnien were gifted by the Kaiser with new Grenadiermützen for parades. [At that time, these mounted companies’ officers, staff and adjutants still wore pickelhauben with white plumes (or black for the Füsiliers)]. By December 1894, all EGRzuFUß Kompagnien had received the new style of Mitre.

    The EGRzuFUß’s new Grenadiermütze was patterned after one worn by Frederick der Große’s Regimental Guard (Königlich Preußisches Regiments Garde Nr. 15, from 1753 to 1786). It was made from pressed or stamped, white, sheet metal and did not have a scaled metal chin strap. Bataillone I & II’s Mitres sported red cloth trim around their front plates, red cloth bodies with three white cloth strips running from peak to base (silver bullion for the officers), and the “Semper Talis” bandeaux. [This was unusual, since only Bataillon I and the Staff were authorized to wear this banner on their helmets]. The Fusilier Bataillon had a gold cloth body with white strips and the “Pro Gloria Et Patria” (For Glory and Country) inscription on the bandeau above the eagle.

    Initially, no chin strap was worn on the new Grenadiermütze; instead, the Mitre was held in place with a leather string that tied under the chin. This method did NOT keep the Grenadiermütze in place and it frequently fell off of the soldier’s head! In 1897, flat, scaled, metal, chin straps were authorized for the Grenadiermütze. Model 1891 chin strap posts were then added to the Grenadiermütze, with the wearer using the metal chin straps from his pickelhaube on his Grenadiermütze. After parade, the chin strap was removed, and the Grenadiermütze was stored in an oil cloth cover in the regimental storeroom. [More about this oil cloth cover will appear later in this special update].

    When the EGRzuFUß received their new Grenadiermützen in 1894, they turned their old ones over to the Kaiser Alexander Guard Grenadier Regt.1 (KAGGR1). It appears that they made this transition between corresponding companies. The SEMPER TALIS bandeaux were removed, and the KAGGR1 wore their Grenadiermützen with two holes in their front plates until they were replaced due normal wear and tear.

    [For more information on these two Mitres and loads of photos, see The Grenadier Mütze of the Imperial German Army by Jim Turinetti].

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