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  • Sale! EMBROIDERED GRAND CROSS OF MILITARY MAX JOSEPH BREAST STAR (REPRODUCTION) - BAVARIA - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    EMBROIDERED GRAND CROSS OF MILITARY MAX JOSEPH BREAST STAR (REPRODUCTION) – BAVARIA

    SKU: 05-1609 XDG

    $250.00 $195.00

    This is a consignment item. It is a REPRODUCTION of the Grand Cross of the Military Max Joseph. It is embroidered rather than made of metal. Such embroidered breast stars were referred to as “Tinsel Stars” in Germany. Commonly used during the 18th and 19th Centuries, they were most popular prior to the 1840’s.
    Our example measures 4 ½” x 4 ½” and is quite handsome. The later metal versions of the breast star are very rare. One would have to pay $8,000.00+ for one. This MODERN REPRODUCTION serves well as a collection space filler. It should NOT be confused with an original piece.


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  • Sale! ERINNERUNGSZEICHEN für VERDIENSTLICHE LEISTUNGEN IM KRIEGSJAHRE 1866 für ZIVILÄRZTE - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    ERINNERUNGSZEICHEN für VERDIENSTLICHE LEISTUNGEN IM KRIEGSJAHRE 1866 für ZIVILÄRZTE

    SKU: 05-1589 XDG

    $2,495.00 $1,995.00

    This is a consignment item. It is the Erinnerungszeichen für Verdienstliche Leistungen im Kriegsjahre 1866 für Zivilärzte (Honor Badge for Meritorious Service in War-Year 1866 by Civilian Doctors), which was awarded during the 1866 Austro-Prussian War. It is a pinback award that measures 2″ x 1 3/4,” and is shaped like an oversized cross. Each arm boasts a caduceus, the ancient sign of a physician. In the cross’s center is the war’s year, 1866. König Ludwig (Mad) II was Bavaria’s monarch during the conflict. It is written that he was greatly affected when he witnessed Bavarian soldiers suffering alongside their Austrian, Württembergian, and Saxon compatriots after their defeat by Prussia and her allies. In addition to the creation of this decoration, Ludwig also instituted the Military Merit Order, Military Service Cross, and the 1866 Bavarian War Honor Medal for the same war. This very rare decoration was for doctors who served Bavaria during the conflict. Only forty were created.


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  • Sale! GERMAN SOUTHWEST AFRICA - AWARD DOCUMENT GROUP FOR SCHUTZTRUPPEN MEMBER - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    GERMAN SOUTHWEST AFRICA – AWARD DOCUMENT GROUP FOR SCHUTZTRUPPEN MEMBER

    SKU: 31-128 XBS

    $995.00 $845.75

    AWARD DOCUMENT GROUP FOR GERMAN SOUTHWEST AFRICA SCHUTZTRUPPEN MEMBER.

    This is a consignment item. The document group covers a German Southwest Africa (DSW) Schutztruppen member named Hugo Kleemann. His documents are chronologically listed below.

    1). Document for the Award of the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class. The document measures 6 ¾” x 10.” At this point Kleemann was an Unteroffizier. It is dated 15 May 1919, after he had been returned to Germany. The document’s left section depicts a standing enlisted man/NCO holding the German national flag (NOT the kriegsflagge) beneath a 1914 Iron Cross. The man is wearing the Schutztruppen’s well-known hut (hat) with its half-turned-up brim. The document is stamped in blue ink with the Schutztruppen unit’s identification “Kommando der Schutztruppen im Reichskolonialministerium” (Imperial Colonial Office Protection Forces Command) accompanying a scrawled official’s signature. The document clearly states that on this date Kleemann had received his Iron Cross 2nd Class.

    2). Ausweiß (Identity Transcript). The document’s obverse is dated 16 May 1919. It was issued in Friedrichshafen on the same date, and measures 8″ x 10 ¼.” It bears the unit stamp for the “Reichs-Kolonial amt Kommando der Schutztruppen” (an abbreviated form of Imperial Colonial Office Protection Forces Command). It also features a hastily scrawled Major’s signature. The document’s reverse states that Kleemann was honorably separated from the Schutztruppen effective 30 January 1919.

    3). Fifteen-Years Loyal Service Award Document. It is a first class award that bears the Schutztruppen’s unit stamp. It was signed by the same officer who signed Kleemann’s 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class Award Document. The Service award’s date is 31 October 1919. It measures 6 ¼” x 7.”

    4). Kolonialabzeichen Urkunde (Colonial Badge Award Document). The award’s date was 22 March 1922. The document measures 7 ¼” x 8 ½.” Two of the sides display African motifs such as a native shield, spears and swords. A lion’s head decorates the document’s top. The phrase “Afrika, Kiautschou, and Südsee” is displayed at the document’s bottom enclosed within a wreath. The document was signed with the purple grease pencil often used by officers in the field.

    5). Hindenburg Cross for Combatants Award Document. This was awarded through the Hamburg police department (we later discover that Kleemann was a Hamburg policeman). The basic form date given for the preprinted document is 13 July 1934. It was signed and issued on 19 December 1934 by a police official. It measures 5 ¾” x 8 ¼.”

    6). Police Department Long-Service Award Document. This is a very fancy velum document attesting to twenty-five years of long service to the police department. The document is signed in Berlin with a deeply embossed eagle and swastika. It is dated 26 September 1938, and is signed at the bottom with a reproduction signature for “Der Führer and Reichskanzler Adolf Hitler.” The document measures 8 ¼” x 11 ½,” and is four pages long, only one of which was used. It is a very impressive document that was presented in the name of the German people.

    This most interesting document group celebrates a man’s service during and after WW I. You may wish to purchase both the group and the book on Iron Cross awards in German Southwest Africa, which would make a fine companion for the documents.


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  • Sale! GERMANY - DOCUMENT AND PHOTO GROUP - LUFTSCHIFFER OFFICER - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    GERMANY – DOCUMENT AND PHOTO GROUP – LUFTSCHIFFER OFFICER

    SKU: 21-325 XBS

    $2,495.00 $2,120.75

    If you have an interest in document groups, we have something special for you. If you have an interest in observation balloons and zeppelins, this wonderful group is VERY special for you. The number of documents it contains is absolutely staggering, and will enable you to track and research almost everything the man ever did. His name was Werner Eugen Möschke. He was born in 1881, then first entered the army at the dawn of the 20th Century. The document group indicates he saw early service in Nassau Field Artillery-Regiment Nr 27. After completing his mandatory two years of military service, Möschke began his post high school (called “gymnasium” in Germany) studies, eventually becoming a mechanical engineer. The group contains many documents from this period, including some confirming his graduation and his qualifications as an engineer.

    When WW I broke out, Möschke found himself in a Luftschiffer-Bataillon as a Leutnant der Reserve. Luftschiffer-Bataillons included the observation balloons that were launched from mobile units to spy on enemy positions and call in artillery strikes, which was his assignment. Later he was transferred to the Luftschiffer-Bataillon’s zeppelin section. He finished the war as a Hauptmann der Reserve. Our document group provides definite proof that he did indeed serve with a zeppelin unit, although I am unable to determine if he was onboard as a zeppelin commander or if he was a unit commander. [Please note: in 1917, the Imperial German Army decided it was no longer interested in fielding Luftschiffer-Bataillons. So, the Army turned over all its airships and zeppelin-related equipment to the Kaiserliche Marine, including (perhaps) some transfer of personnel].
    Möschke returned to his peacetime profession when WW I was over. In the 1930’s, however, he returned to the army, where he eventually achieved a major’s rank. The group’s consignor has included several typed papers containing translated information concerning some of the documents, including his war service. These papers indicate that he served as a member of the executive committee for a military reporting office in Freiburg during WW II. Photos from the group show him wearing the very rare Army Commemorative Airship Badge, which further documents his involvement with zeppelins as well as an observation squadron.
    We are listing some of the group’s military-related documents below. Some of them detail his various assignments during the Great War.

    Above all, they show some of the more important and costly battles in which Möschke was involved.

    1) 1907 Artillerie Officer’s Patent.

    The same type of patent was used whether its recipient was a Leutnant or a Generalmajor. The only real difference is that junior officer’s Patents were not signed by Kaiser Wilhelm II. Prior to WW I, the Kaiser had personally signed Patents in the rank of Hauptmann and above. Due to the Imperial German Army’s size, however, as the war progressed, he signed far fewer Patents, perhaps only for Majors and above.

    2) Award Document for the Long-Service Award 2nd Class. Dated March 1914, it was issued through the XVIII Armeekorps.

    3) Award Document for the Iron Cross 2nd Class. It is dated August 1917.

    4) Award Document for the Ernst Ludwig Allgemeines Ehrenzeichen für Tapferkeit.

    He was awarded Hesse’s Iron Cross 2nd Class equivalent in 1915. The very ornate document bears the Grand Duke of Hesse’s signature. Möschke probably was a native son of Hesse to have received its award so much earlier than the Imperial Iron Cross 2nd Class he later was awarded.

    5) Enlisted Man/NCO’s Militärpaß and Soldbuch. This dates from his two-year mandatory service.

    6) Two Kriegsranglisten.

    These documents were used by officers, much as an enlisted man and NCO used a Militärpaß. Each contained all of their owner’s critical information about his rank, promotions, areas of service with dates, awards, and so on. They are excellent sources for research. They indicate that he saw service in the battles of Verdun and Ypres. One of the two was updated in 1935 when he once more re-entered the army.

    7) Hindenburg Cross with Swords for Combatants Award Document. The document is dated 1935.

    A number of military-related documents date from 1935 forward. Following WW II, Möschke went through the de-Nazification process where he was deemed not to be a hard-core Nazi threat. He again returned to engineering, although the papers indicate he had health problems that stemmed from his many high-altitude flights. He died at the age of 73.

    We have barely scratched the surface of what is contained in this fantastic document group. We have never offered anything as extensive as this group! Möschke took great pains to retain the many documents that related to his military and professional life. Stacked up, the group measures some two-to-three inches in height! Frankly, the group is mind-boggling.

    You will have hours of fun pouring though all of these documents and learning more about a man who served his country through two world wars. Please be ready for the large number of photographs attached to our entry. In this case, a picture IS worth a thousand words!

    This is a consignment item.

    CONSIDER ADDING THIS TO THE COLLECTION:

    HINDENBURG CROSS WITH SWORDS – COMBATANT’S


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  • Sale! GOLDEN MILITARY SERVICE MEDAL - BAVARIA - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    GOLDEN MILITARY SERVICE MEDAL – BAVARIA

    SKU: 05-1558 XDG

    $1,295.00 $1,025.00

    This is a consignment item. It is a second generation (non awarded) example of the Golden Military Service Medal from the Kingdom of Bavaria. The decoration was the highest award that could be given to a Bavarian enlisted man or NCO. The medal would have been purchased from a medal supply shop and used for mounting on a medal bar. This could have happened because the owner wanted to keep his issued piece “put away,” so as prevent it from being lost or damaged. Perhaps it was a replacement for a lost or damaged decoration. At any rate, it should NOT be confused with a presentation example.
    The gilt-toned decoration is actually a gold wash over .800 silver. The obverse has a profile of Maximilian (Max) Joseph, the first King of Bavaria. The reverse features the rampant Bavarian Lion with crown, sword, and shield. An older ribbon comes with it. It is in very fine condition.


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  • Sale! H. J. WILM-MADE DELUXE COVERED PRIVATE CHALICE/CEREMONIAL CUP ONCE OWNED BY BADEN’S GROßHERZOG FRIEDRICH II WITH ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    H. J. WILM-MADE DELUXE COVERED PRIVATE CHALICE/CEREMONIAL CUP ONCE OWNED BY BADEN’S GROßHERZOG FRIEDRICH II WITH ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE

    SKU: 20-318 XKR

    $9,995.00 $8,495.00

    This is a consignment item. It is a covered silver chalice or ceremonial drinking cup housed in a very ornate presentation case, once owned by Großherzog (Grand Duke) Friedrich II (1857-1928), the Grand Duchy of Baden’s final ruler. He ruled from his father Friedrich’s death in 1907 until the German Empire’s 1918 demise. The cup was produced in Berlin by one of Kaiser Wilhelm II’s house jewelers, H. J. Wilm. Its overall height is 7 1/4.” The diameter at the rim is 2 1/4,” while its diameter at the bottom is 2 7/8.” [While we use the term “chalice,” we do not feel its use was necessarily religious].
    The vessel sports a fitted top, whose handle is graphically depicted as rising flames. It lifts off to reveal a polished, gilt-toned inner bowl. The lid’s underside is also gold-toned. The bowl is quite small (from the standpoint of a liquid-holding vessel). It would hold no more than 3-4 ounces of liquid. The bowl’s exterior displays the central emblem from 1. Badisches Leib-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 109 officer’s wappen. [This was the Grand Duchy’s most elite infantry regiment. It was founded in 1803 and garrisoned at the capital city of Karlsruhe. The regiment was assigned to the XIV. Armeekorps. It fought extensively in the Napoleonic Wars. It ranked with other kingdoms’ elite regiments, such as Prussia’s 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß, Saxony’s 1 Sächs. Leib-Grenadier-Regiment Nr 100, Hesse-Darmstadt’s Leibgarde-Infanterie-Regiment (1. Grossherzog. Hessisches) Nr 115, and Württemberg’s Grenadier-Regiment (1. Württembergisches) Königin Olga]. The emblem consists of a sunburst with a red, enamel cross in its center. (In my opinion, this regiment’s wappen is one of Imperial Germany’s most beautiful).
    The chalice’s opposite side features Baden’s crowned Coat-of-Arms. The Coat-of-Arms’ trim and its crown are rose gold. A three-dimensional griffin’s head serves as the chalice’s stem. The mythical creature symbolized Baden, just as a black eagle did Prussia and rampant lions did Bavaria. It was displayed on Infanterie and Dragoner pickelhauben, as well as on Artillerie kugelhelme. The griffin is beautifully executed, with its beak, ears, and feathers richly detailed. Baden’s royal crown sits atop the griffin’s head, cradling the bowl’s base. (I missed this crown the first time that I looked at the chalice). Its details are truly magnificent. The griffin stem rests upon a simple, sculpted metal base. The base’s bottom displays six square pointed metal designs that resemble pointed studs. The hallmark for Berlin’s H. J. Wilm firm appears between two of the “studs,” along with a .800 silver hallmark, as well as the half moon and the Hohenzollern Crown specified by Kaiser Wilhelm I in 1885 when he Germany’s silver and gold standards. This magnificent chalice comes housed in a deluxe presentation/storage case. It measures 8 1/4″ x 4″ x 3 ½.” The finely constructed case is made of leatherette. It sports an unusual swing away catch to lock it. Inside the case we see a royal purple silk upper half. In the silk liner’s center, embossed in gold, is the inscription written below. “H. J. Wilm Königl. Hof Juwelier Berlin” A crown appears above the H. J. Wilm and a small design just below the attribution’s last line. The case’s bottom is lined in matching purple velvet. The base is fitted to accommodate the chalice and its top.

    This is an amazing personality piece for Grand Duke Friedrich of Baden. The quality is superb. It would most certainly become the centerpiece of any collection.

    In stock


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  • Sale! IMPERIAL GERMAN NAVY OFFICER’S CAP BADGE - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    IMPERIAL GERMAN NAVY OFFICER’S CAP BADGE

    SKU: 13-1006

    $695.00 $650.00

    This is a consignment item. It is a cap badge that was displayed in the front center of a naval officer’s schirmütze. It measures 2 ¾ x 3.” The badge is made of fine gold bullion, including the Hohenzollern Crown that was emblematic of the crowns seen on all naval items. The bullion extends to the laurel leaves that encircle the badge’s kokarde. These varied according to officer’s duties. This particular variety is for an officer who served aboard a Kaiserliche Marine ship.
    Its kokarde is gold bullion with a red center, indicating the Reich rather than a particular State. It sports a different type of cloth as its backing on the reverse. The obverse’s bullion displays a wonderful patina that just shouts that it is one-hundred-plus years-old. The patina and its honest wear assure us that this is the real deal.
    It is a marvelous example of these hard-to-find cap badges.


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  • Sale! IRON CROSS - 1813 - 2nd CLASS  - WITH DOCUMENTATION, INCLUDING AWARD DOCUMENT - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    IRON CROSS – 1813 – 2nd CLASS – WITH DOCUMENTATION, INCLUDING AWARD DOCUMENT

    SKU: 09-995 XTC

    $4,995.00 $4,195.00

    It is a very interesting and exciting mini group that includes an 1813 Iron Cross 2nd Class, its actual award document, and another document from some twenty years after the initial award. The 1813 Iron Cross introduced a completely new concept in medals awarded to soldiers for their battle service, i.e., that a man could be awarded a medal no matter what rank he possessed, whether he was a private or a general. The Napoleonic Wars had been raging for several years, but the tide was turning by the time the 1813 Iron Crosswas first awarded. As a matter of fact, the wars ended that same year. Napoleon, however, was never one to give up easily. He escaped from exile in March 1815 and returned to wage war at theBattle of Waterloo in June. Bonaparte was finally defeated on 18 June 1815 and sentenced to permanent exile on St. Helena, where he died six years later.

    The Iron Cross was instituted under König Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia’s rule. Since it was a new decoration that suffered production problems, its award process did not complete until the late 1830’s. Similar situations occurred in 1870 and 1914, in that those particular Iron Crosses continued to be awarded AFTER their respective wars had ended. [TRIVIA ALERT! The award of the 1813 Iron Cross included a pension from the Crown].
    Our mini group includes its award document. The award document (urkunde) was made out to a man named Jacob Nagel. The document measures 8″ x 8.” It is housed in a sturdy plastic holder due to its age. It is a pre printed form to which the appropriate information has been added in black ink. Its bottom left corner features the House of Hohenzollern’s Coat-of-Arms. The document was signed by the Ordens Kanzler, and is dated 16 March 1818. This makes it one of the earlier awards, even though it was made five years after the decoration was introduced.

    The second document measures 6 ¾” x 8.” It is a simple handwritten paper that is also penned in black. It refers again to Jacob Nagel, and was signed by a Major who commanded a Landwehr-Regiment. It refers to another decoration that I believe was being forwarded to Nagel as it refers to an award numbered 3218. I am presuming that the Major sent that decoration and its urkunde to Nagel. The document is dated 1840. I am sorry I cannot be more specific about the document’s contents. It is handwritten in German Fraktur Script, which is difficult to decipher (in spite of the fact that the lettering strongly stands out against the yellowed paper).
    The group’s final piece is Jacob Nagel’s awarded 1813 Iron Cross 2nd Class. The medal’s plain black obverse is devoid of any information. The paint shows honest age, which includes some paint bubbling (entirely normal for a two-hundred-year-old Iron Cross). Its reverse features Friedrich Wilhelm III’s crown and cypher with an oak leaf branch below it. The Cross’s bottom arm, where we normally expect to see the year 1813, has been damaged and obscures the date. The damage actually begins at the oak leaves’ bottom. One can see up under its iron center. The damage is regrettable, but it lends a certain character to the decoration. The EK 2 sports a combatant’s ribbon.

    This is a high-quality mini group that simply screams “HISTORY!” It affirms the emergence of Imperial-era Prussia.

    This is a consignment item.


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  • Sale! IRON CROSS - 1870 - 1st CLASS - GODET WITH PIN AND TWO SIDE HOOKS

    IRON CROSS – 1870 – 1st CLASS – GODET WITH PIN AND TWO SIDE HOOKS

    SKU: 09-958 XTC

    $3,895.00 $3,295.00

    IRON CROSS – 1870 – 1st CLASS – GODET WITH PIN AND TWO SIDE HOOKS

    In my opinion, the most elegant Iron Cross variant displayed a traditional pinback arrangement AND two side hooks. An Iron Cross such as this required that the wearer have three sets of loops sewn onto his tunic’s left breast to accommodate it. While its single pin is sturdy enough to pierce a wool tunic, the two side hooks are quite delicate. They would snap if one attempted to insert them through the tunic in the same manner. Very few jewelry firms offered this Iron Cross style, and no one did it better than Godet, the maker of this Iron Cross. One of Kaiser Wilhelm II’s house jewelers, the firm J. Godet und Söhne was known as a premiere provider of Orders and Decorations.

    This Iron Cross is non vaulted (flat), which is how all issued 1870 Iron Crosses (approximately 1,300) appeared. The obverse’s paint is nearly mint. The frame that surrounds its black core is handsomely produced. The beading is even and problem-free. The frame displays a lovely patina that beautifully sets off the iron core. Its reverse displays the pinback arrangement with two side hooks that I described above. The two very delicate side hooks are present, and look just as they did when this EK was first acquired by the original owner. Sometimes the side hooks have been re-soldered, but not in this case. The clasp securing the pin is large and sturdy. [It is merely a small detail, but part of what one expects from Godet]. Finally, we turn to the pin itself. It is a well mounted, swollen design with the classic “coke bottle” shape. Expertly engraved on that pin is “Godet Berlin.”

    This pristine 1870 Iron Cross 1st Class would make a superb addition to any collection.

    This is a consignment item.

    In stock


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  • Sale! IRON CROSS - 1870 - 2nd CLASS - NON COMBATANTS WITH TWENTY-FIVE-YEAR OAK LEAVES MOUNTED ON TRI-FOLD RIBBON - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    IRON CROSS – 1870 – 2nd CLASS – NON COMBATANTS WITH TWENTY-FIVE-YEAR OAK LEAVES MOUNTED ON TRI-FOLD RIBBON

    SKU: 09-960 XTZ

    $1,395.00 $1,195.00

    This is a consignment item. In 1895 Kaiser Wilhelm II authorized the award of Twenty-Five-Year Oak Leaves for the 1870 Iron Cross. This was for veterans who were awarded the 1870 EK during the Franco-Prussian War and the subsequent years, as awards caught up with all those deemed worthy. Furthermore, they remained in the reich’s service. This 1870 Iron Cross is in very fine condition, both on its obverse and reverse. I believe it was not an issued piece, but instead was sold as a full rig with the Twenty-Five-Year Oak Leaves attached. Its paint is even and just beginning to “crinkle,” as we so often see on 19th Century Iron Crosses. The “25” year device sports a fine, frosted-silver finish.
    What makes this Iron Cross special is all about the ribbon. The ribbon boasts a wide, white, central panel flanked by two thinner black bands, which means it is for Non Combatants. The ribbon’s other distinctive feature is that it is a tri-fold. Although Austrians folded their ribbons in this manner, they did NOT participate in the Franco-Prussian War. Thus, the ribbon most probably was for a soldier from Saxony. The ribbon makes the Iron Cross quite distinctive, as well as quite scarce. Both ribbon and cross are in top condition.


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  • Sale! IRON CROSS - 1914 - 1st CLASS - SEWN ON - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    IRON CROSS – 1914 – 1st CLASS – SEWN ON

    SKU: 09-942 XWB

    $550.00 $500.00

    It is an interesting variation of a 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class. It is a flat (non vaulted) example. Its condition is exceptional, with clear and clean paint on the obverse. It gets even better when we turn the cross over. The very first thing we notice is that it has no pin. It is not that the pin is missing; a pin never was attached. Instead, each of its four arms sports two very neat holes drilled into it, for a grand total of eight. This arrangement allowed the Iron Cross to be sewn directly onto a tunic, probably an officer’s. It is a very unusual mounting method.

    This is a consignment item.

    In stock


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  • Sale! IRON CROSS - 1914 - 2nd CLASS - PRIVATELY-PURCHASED - ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    IRON CROSS – 1914 – 2nd CLASS – PRIVATELY-PURCHASED – ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE

    SKU: 09-1020 XMB

    $450.00 $350.00

    IRON CROSS – 1914 – 2nd CLASS – PRIVATELY-PURCHASED – ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE

    This is a consignment item. It is a striking 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class in the original presentation case. The red leatherette case measures 1″ x 2 ½” x 3 ¾.” Some scuffing on its surface indicates honest age. The interior’s upper half is covered with white silk. Stretched across that white silk is a white and blue ribbon that is embossed with an Iron Cross’s outline. The dates 1914 and 1918 flank the Iron Cross on either side. This band’s white and blue colors lead me to believe it was manufactured in Bavaria. The silk band permits the EK’s ribbon to be stored behind it. The case’s bottom half is lined in with burgundy velvet that was NOT fitted to hold the EK’s pin.
    The Iron Cross itself is a very high-quality example. The paint on its obverse is quite pleasing and rates at 98%. The cross’s frame features an excellent patina. A hallmark appears on the jump ring, but I cannot decipher it. The ribbon attached to the cross is well used, with significant shredding/running in its silk. This handsome 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class and presentation case’s quality indicates that it is a privately-purchased, post WW I example.


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