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ÜBERROCK – GENERAL der INFANTERIE À LA SUITE – GRENADIER-REGIMENT KÖNIG KARL (5. WÜRTTEMBERGISCHES) Nr 123 – WÜRTTEMBERG

SKU: 15-551

$2,995.00

The überrock was a frock coat (longer in length than a conventional tunic) that was used until 1910 (approximately) when it was phased-out by tunics. At first glance it looks like a pre WW I dark-blue tunic. Instead of ending at or near the midriff however, it continues to the knee area. In any event, it is a much longer tunic. Today we are offering an überrock from Grenadier-Regiment König Karl (5. Württembergisches) Nr 123. The Regiment was founded in 1799. It was garrisoned at Ulm and attached to Württemberg’s XIII Armeekorps. This überrock is quite simple. Its body is dark-blue. A double row of five (ten-total) gilt buttons run down its center. (Its reverse boasts four more large gilt buttons at the vent flap). Its collar is red and red material trims its cuffs. Its second buttonhole sports a prinzengroße-sized Iron Cross ribbon. As the tunic is clearly pre 1910 (indeed, it is from much earlier), the ribbon is for an 1870 Iron Cross 2nd Class. I have saved the best detail for last. Its shoulder boards are for a General der Infanterie! The shoulder boards show that the silver bullion areas’ chevrons are red and black, confirming that they belonged to a Württemberg General. Next, we see the two rank pips that indicate a General der Infanterie. You will note they are silver, although the silver wash has disappeared from several small places, revealing the underlying brass. In their centers is König Karl’s crowned, royal cypher. He was Grenadier-Regiment König Karl (5. Württembergisches) Nr 123’s patron. Inside the coat is a fine, black, silk liner. No ownership tag is present, but it does show (unsurprisingly) that the coat was produced in Stuttgart by Gustav Rörer. The firm was a noted purveyor to Württemberg’s royal household. [From some quick research, we found that Herzog Wilhelm Nikolaus was a General der Infanterie à la Suite officer to the Regiment. The information came from several Ranglistes from before and after König Wilhelm II’s time]. The überrock’s exterior is generally pleasing. Some scattered moth nips appear, which are not detractive. The largest is near the Iron Cross ribbon. Also, a repair was made to a seam on the überrock’s back. [We will highlight these areas in the accompanying photographs]. The seam let go and was re-sewn from the outside, instead of removing the lining. Nevertheless, the erstwhile tailor did a tidy job.


Description

The überrock was a frock coat (longer in length than a conventional tunic) that was used until 1910 (approximately) when it was phased-out by tunics. At first glance it looks like a pre WW I dark-blue tunic. Instead of ending at or near the midriff however, it continues to the knee area. In any event, it is a much longer tunic. Today we are offering an überrock from Grenadier-Regiment König Karl (5. Württembergisches) Nr 123. The Regiment was founded in 1799. It was garrisoned at Ulm and attached to Württemberg’s XIII Armeekorps. This überrock is quite simple. Its body is dark-blue. A double row of five (ten-total) gilt buttons run down its center. (Its reverse boasts four more large gilt buttons at the vent flap). Its collar is red and red material trims its cuffs. Its second buttonhole sports a prinzengroße-sized Iron Cross ribbon. As the tunic is clearly pre 1910 (indeed, it is from much earlier), the ribbon is for an 1870 Iron Cross 2nd Class. I have saved the best detail for last. Its shoulder boards are for a General der Infanterie! The shoulder boards show that the silver bullion areas’ chevrons are red and black, confirming that they belonged to a Württemberg General. Next, we see the two rank pips that indicate a General der Infanterie. You will note they are silver, although the silver wash has disappeared from several small places, revealing the underlying brass. In their centers is König Karl’s crowned, royal cypher. He was Grenadier-Regiment König Karl (5. Württembergisches) Nr 123’s patron. Inside the coat is a fine, black, silk liner. No ownership tag is present, but it does show (unsurprisingly) that the coat was produced in Stuttgart by Gustav Rörer. The firm was a noted purveyor to Württemberg’s royal household. [From some quick research, we found that Herzog Wilhelm Nikolaus was a General der Infanterie à la Suite officer to the Regiment. The information came from several Ranglistes from before and after König Wilhelm II’s time]. The überrock’s exterior is generally pleasing. Some scattered moth nips appear, which are not detractive. The largest is near the Iron Cross ribbon. Also, a repair was made to a seam on the überrock’s back. [We will highlight these areas in the accompanying photographs]. The seam let go and was re-sewn from the outside, instead of removing the lining. Nevertheless, the erstwhile tailor did a tidy job.