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TRENCH ART LAMP

SKU: 24-125

$275.00

This is an artillery shell casing that has been made into a trench art lamp. Trench art was made from everyday items that were readily available to soldiers in the trenches or convalescing from war wounds in field hospitals. Shell casings and other artillery parts frequently were etched or carved with battlefield symbols or floral designs and converted into vases, patriotic jewelry, match safes and the like. This particular brass shell casing, which measures 9″ tall and 3″ inches in diameter, has had its main section etched with a bark-like pattern. The patterned area contains two flowers (roses, perhaps), a sprig of leaves and a double cross symbol. The shell casing has had a wooden post inserted into that, which sticks out at the top approximately 1/4.” Someone attached a lamp socket, rising another 3 1/2,” to the post so that it can hold a light bulb. The shell casing is mounted on a piece of petrified wood for the lamp’s base. The wooden base measures 11″ x 9 1/2″ wide and approximately 2″ high. The dark-brown wood is attractively gnarled and swirled with darker rings and burls. We cannot tell what type of wood it is, although oak is a possibility. It has been treated with some sort of lacquer or preservative that gives it a soft shine. An electrical cord extends out from the base’s underside. I am sure the shell casing was converted into a lamp in modern times. The wiring is definitely LATE-20th Century. The decorated shell casing was probably intended for use as a vase. It makes a fetching lamp, however. It does not come with a lampshade or the harp to which the shade is attached. Low wattage light bulbs should be used, probably not above 60 watts. We tried it out with a 40-watt bulb and it lit up without any problems. Its new owner will have the fun of choosing an appropriate shade and displaying this attractive trench art piece.


Description

This is an artillery shell casing that has been made into a trench art lamp. Trench art was made from everyday items that were readily available to soldiers in the trenches or convalescing from war wounds in field hospitals. Shell casings and other artillery parts frequently were etched or carved with battlefield symbols or floral designs and converted into vases, patriotic jewelry, match safes and the like. This particular brass shell casing, which measures 9″ tall and 3″ inches in diameter, has had its main section etched with a bark-like pattern. The patterned area contains two flowers (roses, perhaps), a sprig of leaves and a double cross symbol. The shell casing has had a wooden post inserted into that, which sticks out at the top approximately 1/4.” Someone attached a lamp socket, rising another 3 1/2,” to the post so that it can hold a light bulb. The shell casing is mounted on a piece of petrified wood for the lamp’s base. The wooden base measures 11″ x 9 1/2″ wide and approximately 2″ high. The dark-brown wood is attractively gnarled and swirled with darker rings and burls. We cannot tell what type of wood it is, although oak is a possibility. It has been treated with some sort of lacquer or preservative that gives it a soft shine. An electrical cord extends out from the base’s underside. I am sure the shell casing was converted into a lamp in modern times. The wiring is definitely LATE-20th Century. The decorated shell casing was probably intended for use as a vase. It makes a fetching lamp, however. It does not come with a lampshade or the harp to which the shade is attached. Low wattage light bulbs should be used, probably not above 60 watts. We tried it out with a 40-watt bulb and it lit up without any problems. Its new owner will have the fun of choosing an appropriate shade and displaying this attractive trench art piece.