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S.M.S. ILTIS COLORIZED POSTCARD

SKU: 44-319

$50.00

The S.M.S. Iltis was one of the Kaiserliche Marine’s most famous ships. She was also one of the smallest – but she and her crew had big hearts, especially on 17 June 1900, as you will see. The Iltis was a kanonenboot that was designed to patrol Germany’s and her Colonial empire’s waters and inland possessions. She was commissioned in 1898 and sent to China. She arrived during the Boxer Rebellion (1899-1901). [It was a revolt against the foreign powers who by then were China’s de facto rulers. Most of the European powers were present, as well as Japan. The Boxers revolted against the unjust rule, accompanied by forces backed (on an informal basis) by the Chinese Empress. On 17 June 1900, a battle took place at the Taku Forts between Allied naval units and Chinese forces. The S.M.S. Iltis suffered substantial damage during the battle, although the Allies were victorious. Several of her crew were killed, while others were wounded, including her commander Korvettenkapitän Wilhelm Lans.
Kaiser Wilhelm was ecstatic, not only with his colonial forces (which he had pushed for over von Bismarck’s objections), but with his beloved Navy. Therefore, on 24 June 1900 he awarded the PLM to Lans. Even more unprecedented, he awarded a PLM to the S.M.S. Iltis! From that point forward, the ship proudly wore an oversized PLM on the jack stand at the ship’s bow. The Iltis then continued to patrol the waters of China until 1914, when WW I led Germany’s East Asian Squadron (Ostasien Geschwader) to return home.
Our colorized postcard shows the S.M.S. Iltis at the height of the Battle of the Taku Forts. The Iltis is in the foreground, her twin battle ensigns flying proudly in the breeze. Smoke from her cannons partially covers the ship. The forts can be seen behind her, as well as another Allied ship. Several splashes are visible in the water around her. Below the ship is the legend “S.M.S. Iltis vor Taku am 17 Juni 1900.” The scene comes from a painting by a noted German naval artist (I believe it is Claus Bergen). The postcard was not mailed, but does bear a rubber stamp from a Berlin postcard shop.

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The S.M.S. Iltis was one of the Kaiserliche Marine’s most famous ships. She was also one of the smallest – but she and her crew had big hearts, especially on 17 June 1900, as you will see. The Iltis was a kanonenboot that was designed to patrol Germany’s and her Colonial empire’s waters and inland possessions. She was commissioned in 1898 and sent to China. She arrived during the Boxer Rebellion (1899-1901). [It was a revolt against the foreign powers who by then were China’s de facto rulers. Most of the European powers were present, as well as Japan. The Boxers revolted against the unjust rule, accompanied by forces backed (on an informal basis) by the Chinese Empress. On 17 June 1900, a battle took place at the Taku Forts between Allied naval units and Chinese forces. The S.M.S. Iltis suffered substantial damage during the battle, although the Allies were victorious. Several of her crew were killed, while others were wounded, including her commander Korvettenkapitän Wilhelm Lans.
Kaiser Wilhelm was ecstatic, not only with his colonial forces (which he had pushed for over von Bismarck’s objections), but with his beloved Navy. Therefore, on 24 June 1900 he awarded the PLM to Lans. Even more unprecedented, he awarded a PLM to the S.M.S. Iltis! From that point forward, the ship proudly wore an oversized PLM on the jack stand at the ship’s bow. The Iltis then continued to patrol the waters of China until 1914, when WW I led Germany’s East Asian Squadron (Ostasien Geschwader) to return home.
Our colorized postcard shows the S.M.S. Iltis at the height of the Battle of the Taku Forts. The Iltis is in the foreground, her twin battle ensigns flying proudly in the breeze. Smoke from her cannons partially covers the ship. The forts can be seen behind her, as well as another Allied ship. Several splashes are visible in the water around her. Below the ship is the legend “S.M.S. Iltis vor Taku am 17 Juni 1900.” The scene comes from a painting by a noted German naval artist (I believe it is Claus Bergen). The postcard was not mailed, but does bear a rubber stamp from a Berlin postcard shop.