Previous Page

PRUSSIA – SANKE CARD – LEUTNANT WILHELM FRANKL – AVIATION – NR 384

SKU: 42-214

$55.00

PRUSSIA – SANKE CARD – LEUTNANT WILHELM FRANKL – AVIATION – NR 384.

Wilhelm Frankl (1893-1917) began as a pilot in an observation plane. His first victory came when he used a carbine to shoot down his opponent. He went on to score twenty confirmed victories before falling in April 1917. He received little attention during the 1930’s because he was Jewish. He was often scornfully referred to as the “Jew with the Blue Max.” Frankl is seated in Sanke Card Nr 384. His PLM appears at his throat, and he also wears his 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class and a Prussian Army Pilot Badge. The postcard was mailed via regular post in 1925 and is in excellent condition.

In stock


Description

PRUSSIA – SANKE CARD – LEUTNANT WILHELM FRANKL – AVIATION – NR 384.

Wilhelm Frankl (1893-1917) began as a pilot in an observation plane. His first victory came when he used a carbine to shoot down his opponent. He went on to score twenty confirmed victories before falling in April 1917. He received little attention during the 1930’s because he was Jewish. He was often scornfully referred to as the “Jew with the Blue Max.” Frankl is seated in Sanke Card Nr 384. His PLM appears at his throat, and he also wears his 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class and a Prussian Army Pilot Badge. The postcard was mailed via regular post in 1925 and is in excellent condition.

You may also like…

  • LARGE SERVING PLATTER FROM KAISER WILHELM II’s S. M. S. KAISER WILHELM II DINNER SERVICE - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    LARGE SERVING PLATTER FROM KAISER WILHELM II’s S. M. S. KAISER WILHELM II DINNER SERVICE

    SKU: 20-320

    $2,495.00

    This is an interesting, very rare, large, table platter for Kaiser Wilhelm II while he sailed with the German fleet aboard the Battleship S. M. S. Kaiser Wilhelm II, which served as his flagship while he was with his fleet. Kaiser Wilhelm II was very intrigued by his Navy and his role within it. Plans for the Imperial German Navy’s expansion were constantly brewing between the Kaiser and his alter-ego, Admiral von Tirpitz, at the Navy Ministry. Naturally, as the German Empire’s Kaiser, Wilhelm was expected to live well, but he went FAR beyond that. Wilhelm lived in virtually the same style on his royal yacht, the S. M. Y. Hohenzollern, as he did at any of his palaces on land, INCLUDING the specially-designed dishware. The S. M. Y Hohenzollern carried special plates, saucers, etc., exclusively for use on that vessel. Another vessel also carried exclusive tableware, the Battleship S. M. S. Kaiser Wilhelm II.
    The S. M. S. Kaiser Wilhelm II was a pre dreadnaught battleship. It was a part of the Kaiser Friedrich III (Wilhelm II’s father) Battleship Class, which included a total of five ships. The S. M. S. Kaiser Wilhelm II was commissioned and entered fleet service in 1900. It served as the Kaiser’s fleet flagship (as well as the High Seas Fleet’s Flagship) from 1900 into 1906. It remained in this role until it was replaced by the S. M. S. Deutschland, which served as the Fleet Flagship from 1906 into 1913. (Naturally, a similar set of dishes was commissioned for the S. M. S. Deutschland!). The S. M. S. Friedrich der Grosse became Fleet Flagship in 1914. (I am not sure if the Kaiser ever sailed with that vessel or if it had any of HIS dishware). The High Seas Fleet’s final flagship was the S. M. S. Baden in 1917.
    When the Kaiser hoisted his flag aboard the S. M. S. Kaiser Wilhelm II, he entertained officers from the fleet, as well as visiting foreign dignitaries. It was at these times that the Kaiser’s personal tableware was brought out to adorn the table. The platter measures a massive 13 1/2″ in diameter. [Please remember that a serving platter like this had far fewer examples within the exclusive tableware than a dinner plate or a salad/dessert plate]. The platter’s edge is trimmed with five smaller gold bands, one larger gold band, and one medium-size gold band. The magnificent platter is in near-mint condition. At its top, we see Kaiser Wilhelm’s flag crossed with his pennant. A blue bandeau imprinted in gold with S. M. S. Kaiser Wilhelm II appears beneath it. The platter’s center features a multicolored Golden Kette of the Order of the Black Eagle. [The latter were a non military family of decorations in which each male member of the House of Hohenzollern was invested. At the King of Prussia’s (later the Kaiser’s) discretion, lower levels of the order could be awarded to worthy recipients]. The centerpiece is VERY striking, to say the least.
    The platter’s reverse displays the KPM logo (the porcelain manufacturing firm that served all Prussian Kings and Kaisers from the time of Frederick the Great through that of Wilhelm II). It also displays that the platter was placed into service in 1902, two years after the S. M. S. Kaiser Wilhelm II first sailed with the fleet.
    This is one of our rarest examples of the Kaiser’s tableware.

    In stock


    Learn More
  • Sale! POCKET FLASK ATTRIBUTED TO KRONPRINZ WILHELM - Imperial German Military Antiques Sale

    POCKET FLASK ATTRIBUTED TO KRONPRINZ WILHELM

    SKU: 20-342 XKR

    $1,795.00 $1,525.00

    POCKET FLASK ATTRIBUTED TO KRONPRINZ WILHELM.

    This is a consignment item. This is a superb example of a pocket flask and is attributed to Kronprinz Wilhelm of Germany. Kronprinz Wilhelm (1882-1951) was Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859-1941) and Kaiserin Auguste Viktoria’s (1858-1921) eldest son, and the heir to the German Empire’s throne. He became, instead, the “Kaiser who never was.” Kronprinz Wilhelm married Mecklenburg-Schwerin’s Duchess Cecilie (1886-1954) in 1905. As she was a beautiful woman, and the Kronprinz was an attractive man, the young pair was rivaled only by the younger Wilhelm’s parents as Imperial Germany’s most popular couple. Dozens of postcards were issued that featured them individually and together, many with their ever-growing family. [On a sad note, their eldest son, also a Wilhelm (1906-1940), was killed in France during WW II. His death caused the German military to pull all royals from front-line service. He had renounced his title when his Grandfather Wilhelm II tried to influence whom he could marry]. As were so many royals, young Kronprinz Wilhelm was trained for the military. In spite of the (presumed) circumspection such training might have encouraged, Kronprinz Wilhelm was a notorious womanizer. He and his wife eventually lived separate lives.
    In August 1914 Kronprinz Wilhelm assumed command of the V. Armee, the principal army that eventually became involved in the Battle of Verdun. Both Germany and France committed about 1,250,000 troops to the battle, which officially ran from 21 February through 18 December 1916. French casualties ranged from 315,000 to 542,000 wounded, along with about 160,000 dead. German casualties ran from 281,000 to 434,000 wounded, with 143,000 battle deaths. [The carnage from this incredible ten-month bloodbath boggles the mind, particularly when multiplied by the hundreds of similar battles during WW I’s four grinding years]. Crown Prince Wilhelm eventually became commander of Army Group German Crown Prince in August 1916, but his service at the front took its toll. As the war progressed, Wilhelm became more vocal about the war’s senselessness. He served with the army through the war’s end in a reduced capacity. At the war’s end, Kronprinz Wilhelm signed letters of abdication along with his father. Both men then went into exile in the Netherlands. While the Kronprinz returned to Germany in 1923, his Father remained in the Netherlands until his 1941 death. Although the Kronprinz was hopeful that the monarchy might resume, he eventually realized that his dream would not come to pass. He withdrew to private life in the late 1930’s, living out his days to die quietly in 1951.
    Today we are offering a rather unique pocket/hip flask attributed to the Kronprinz. Although Kaiser Wilhelm II was known for his generosity in giving out personal gifts, those from the Kronprinz were not as common. My personal theory is that this flask was NOT a gift, but one used personally by the Kronprinz. His gifts to others tended to be more modest than those given out by Wilhelm II. [Although we do offer one of the young Kronprinz’s more lavish gifts: a marvelous silver frame (see immediately below this entry)].

    I would like to emphasize that Kronprinz Wilhelm’s personal ownership of the flask is JUST a theory. If it was not his personal possession, it was a magnificent gift to a very favored man. It definitely was a man’s gift as it is quite large and impressive. The flask certainly was NOT dainty enough to have been used by a lady. It measures 6 ¼” in length and 4 ½” in width. Its back is slightly curved, so it could snuggle up against the owner’s hip. A further indication of its size shows that it holds 12 ounces of liquid. It would have been perfect for storing either brandy or schnapps, both of which were equally prized by Imperial German males.
    Its obverse features the Kronprinz’s large (a substantial 1 ¼” x 2 ¼”) royal cypher in its center beneath a Hohenzollern Crown. The cypher itself is made of high-quality cobalt-blue enamel overlaying an intricate silver scrollwork design accented by several stylized leaves. The flask’s reverse sports an unadorned, mirrored surface.
    A unique flip-off stopper at the flask’s top swings away to allow one access to its contents. A series of hallmarks appears under the swing away stopper. The crown and half moon (mandated in 1885 by Kaiser Wilhelm I for silver content) appears on one panel, along with a boxed .800. Another box to the .800’s right features a castle, followed by “R 9795” and “22” on that same panel. Another panel features an additional “22.”
    This is a surprisingly well made, high-quality flask that might have belonged to Kronprinz Wilhelm.

    In stock


    Learn More