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PRUSSIA – KUGELHELM – ENLISTED MAN – FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT 26 OR FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 35

SKU: 33-356 XKGJT

$3,995.00 $3,450.00

PRUSSIA – KUGELHELM – ENLISTED MAN – FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT 26 OR FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 35.

It is an enlisted man’s (EM) Feld-Artillerie-Regiment (FAR) Nr 26 or Feld-Artillerie-Regiment Nr 35 Kugelhelm from Prussia. FAR Nr 26 was founded in 1872 and garrisoned at Verden. It was assigned to the X. Armeekorps. FAR 36 was created in 1890 and garrisoned at Deutsch-Eylau in West Prussia. It was assigned to the XX. Armeekorps.

This is an extremely rare helmet from the early 1900s. I have only seen three in all of my years of collecting (two officers’ helmets and one enlisted man’s (EM) helmet – this one). [The wappen is identified as Figure 1.7 in Jim Turinetti’s Guide to Collecting the Headgear of the 1914 German Army, as well as his Buyer’s Guide. Figure l.7 is a variation of Figure 1.0]. The wappen features Prussia’s basic line-eagle with the initials FR for Friedrich Rex (König Friedrich der Große) with an outstanding bandeau on the eagle’s thigh/hip area inscribed with “COLBERG 1807,” in recognition of the defiant stance Feld-Artillerie-Regiment Nrs 26’s and 35’s ancestral units took against French forces in 1807. [Colberg/Kolberg: former German seaport in Pommern (Western Pomerania), Prussia, Germany, now, Kolobrzeg, Poland]. The honor banner was authorized for wear in 1899. As you can see, since the bandeau was only in existence for nineteen years, not many EM or NCO’s helmets were created. This plate and helmet configuration was worn by only 0.1 % of the Imperial German Army in 1914. The Eagle is found in only one size and was worn with a Reich’s kokarde on the helmet’s right side and a Prussian State kokarde on the left.

The overall condition of the helmet body is good. NO extra holes are evident, although some slight denting appears on the helmet’s right rear. The surface has not been broken, and its black finish displays a deep luster. The helmet is in the Dienst (Duty) configuration with the leather chin strap that was worn in the field. These two regiments did NOT take a hair bush for parade, so the kugel (ball top) is not removable. The interior of the helmet is typical for this era’s EM helmets, featuring an attractive, supple, leather liner and the fingers (petals) for adjusting the fit.

The kugelhelm was worn by FAR 26’s Batterie Nr 2. It might also have been worn by FAR35 Batteries Nr 1, 2, and 5. Three letters and the number 10 appear on the rear visor. Since FAR 26 was in Armeekorps (AK) X and FAR 35 was in AK XVII in 1905, and then AK XX in 1914, it is very possible that this helmet is from FAR 26, Batterie 2. The three letters might indicate some clothing-related organization for the AK X. Thus, it probably comes from the LESS-represented regiment. Being for a single FAR 26 Batterie makes it a rare bird indeed!

This is a truly rare helmet that would be the crown of any serious helmet collection. 

This is a consignment item.

In stock


Description

PRUSSIA – KUGELHELM – ENLISTED MAN – FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT 26 OR FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT NR 35.

It is an enlisted man’s (EM) Feld-Artillerie-Regiment (FAR) Nr 26 or Feld-Artillerie-Regiment Nr 35 Kugelhelm from Prussia. FAR Nr 26 was founded in 1872 and garrisoned at Verden. It was assigned to the X. Armeekorps. FAR 36 was created in 1890 and garrisoned at Deutsch-Eylau in West Prussia. It was assigned to the XX. Armeekorps.

This is an extremely rare helmet from the early 1900s. I have only seen three in all of my years of collecting (two officers’ helmets and one enlisted man’s (EM) helmet – this one). [The wappen is identified as Figure 1.7 in Jim Turinetti’s Guide to Collecting the Headgear of the 1914 German Army, as well as his Buyer’s Guide. Figure l.7 is a variation of Figure 1.0]. The wappen features Prussia’s basic line-eagle with the initials FR for Friedrich Rex (König Friedrich der Große) with an outstanding bandeau on the eagle’s thigh/hip area inscribed with “COLBERG 1807,” in recognition of the defiant stance Feld-Artillerie-Regiment Nrs 26’s and 35’s ancestral units took against French forces in 1807. [Colberg/Kolberg: former German seaport in Pommern (Western Pomerania), Prussia, Germany, now, Kolobrzeg, Poland]. The honor banner was authorized for wear in 1899. As you can see, since the bandeau was only in existence for nineteen years, not many EM or NCO’s helmets were created. This plate and helmet configuration was worn by only 0.1 % of the Imperial German Army in 1914. The Eagle is found in only one size and was worn with a Reich’s kokarde on the helmet’s right side and a Prussian State kokarde on the left.

The overall condition of the helmet body is good. NO extra holes are evident, although some slight denting appears on the helmet’s right rear. The surface has not been broken, and its black finish displays a deep luster. The helmet is in the Dienst (Duty) configuration with the leather chin strap that was worn in the field. These two regiments did NOT take a hair bush for parade, so the kugel (ball top) is not removable. The interior of the helmet is typical for this era’s EM helmets, featuring an attractive, supple, leather liner and the fingers (petals) for adjusting the fit.

The kugelhelm was worn by FAR 26’s Batterie Nr 2. It might also have been worn by FAR35 Batteries Nr 1, 2, and 5. Three letters and the number 10 appear on the rear visor. Since FAR 26 was in Armeekorps (AK) X and FAR 35 was in AK XVII in 1905, and then AK XX in 1914, it is very possible that this helmet is from FAR 26, Batterie 2. The three letters might indicate some clothing-related organization for the AK X. Thus, it probably comes from the LESS-represented regiment. Being for a single FAR 26 Batterie makes it a rare bird indeed!

This is a truly rare helmet that would be the crown of any serious helmet collection. 

This is a consignment item.