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SWORD – MINIATURE – FROM CHINA

SKU: 22-86

$295.00

This is a most-interesting miniature sword produced in China around (approximately) 1900. The sword’s overall length in its scabbard is 11 11/16.” When drawn from the scabbard, the sword measures 10 11/16″ from pommel to tip. The sword’s blade is plain, except for some Chinese characters that appear below the handle. They may very well be its maker’s marks. Its pommel (sword top) is simple and unadorned. Its style is what I would describe as “free form.” As we move down the grip, we see it is wrapped in what appears to be tightly woven chainmail. Both sides of the grip display some enamel shapes that appear to be flowers and leaves. Three of the four designs feature multicolored enamel work. Its rather narrow cross-guard appears to be made of “paktong.” [Interestingly, “German silver” was created in an attempt to duplicate paktong, a Chinese metal alloy used in jewelry-making]. The sword’s locket (the metal fitting that bears a carrying ring or stud for wearing the sword) and chape (a metal tip that protects the blade’s point), as well as three trim pieces, are also made of paktong. More of the tightly woven chainmail appears among the three trim pieces. More of the enamel designs noted on the grip are mounted in these three sections.
These designs are very attractively done and of the highest quality. In fact, all of the workmanship is topnotch. A miniature sword like this was very attractive to Germans visiting China and provided a fine keepsake from their visit to the ancient country. It is a very well made, attractive, and unusual sword, especially if you are interested in the German Colonial Period of 1890-1914.

In stock


Description

This is a most-interesting miniature sword produced in China around (approximately) 1900. The sword’s overall length in its scabbard is 11 11/16.” When drawn from the scabbard, the sword measures 10 11/16″ from pommel to tip. The sword’s blade is plain, except for some Chinese characters that appear below the handle. They may very well be its maker’s marks. Its pommel (sword top) is simple and unadorned. Its style is what I would describe as “free form.” As we move down the grip, we see it is wrapped in what appears to be tightly woven chainmail. Both sides of the grip display some enamel shapes that appear to be flowers and leaves. Three of the four designs feature multicolored enamel work. Its rather narrow cross-guard appears to be made of “paktong.” [Interestingly, “German silver” was created in an attempt to duplicate paktong, a Chinese metal alloy used in jewelry-making]. The sword’s locket (the metal fitting that bears a carrying ring or stud for wearing the sword) and chape (a metal tip that protects the blade’s point), as well as three trim pieces, are also made of paktong. More of the tightly woven chainmail appears among the three trim pieces. More of the enamel designs noted on the grip are mounted in these three sections.
These designs are very attractively done and of the highest quality. In fact, all of the workmanship is topnotch. A miniature sword like this was very attractive to Germans visiting China and provided a fine keepsake from their visit to the ancient country. It is a very well made, attractive, and unusual sword, especially if you are interested in the German Colonial Period of 1890-1914.