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WÜRTTEMBERG – HAUPTMAN – FELDGRAU FELDBLUSE TUNIC – M-1915 INFANTERIE-REGIMENT Nr 121

SKU: 15-668

$4,995.00

(MEDALS NOT INCLUDED)  This is a superb M-1915 feldgrau officer’s tunic from Infanterie-Regiment Alt-Württemberg (3. Württ.) Nr 121. The regiment was founded in 1716 and garrisoned at Ludwigsburg. It was attached to the Württemberg XIII. Armeekorps.

The feldbluse tunic is easily distinguished from other tunic styles by a frontal flap that covers its buttons, leaving no buttons visible down the tunic’s center. A total of six simple gray buttons is in its center. Once they have been buttoned, an inner flap is laid down, followed by the exterior flap, and “Ausgezeichnet!” the tunic appears to have no center buttons! This creates a very tidy layout that was favored by some officers, however, it was not as popular as the M-1910, M-1915, etc. tunic-styles.

The tunic’s exterior features two pockets that are secured by two small subdued, crowned buttons. The same small buttons secure its shoulder boards. Each shoulder board displays a “121” that identifies the regiment, along with a Hauptmann’s twin pips. The exterior’s final two buttons appear on the reverse in the vent area. They are larger than the other four buttons, the size that normally is visible running down the tunic’s center.
The shoulder boards are the sewn-in variety, which was quite common among Leutnant’s, Oberleutnant’s, and Hauptmann’s ranks. One side is sewn into the tunic and the other is attached by a button. Each shoulder board has a white underlay. The shoulder boards are of the M-1915 feldgrau variety. The chevrons atop the shoulder boards are both black and red, which is indicative of Württemberg. The tunic’s collar is also feldgrau, which is quite interesting.

One other very important area on the tunic’s left chest elevates this tunic to the realm of the VERY, VERY special. The top left breast area sports large set of horizontally sewn-in loops for a massive ribbon bar. Based on these dimensions I believe that a MINIMUM eight-to-ten decorations appeared on the actual ribbon bar. Just below this area, the tunic gets even better!

Typically, most tunics sport two or three sets of loops for its owner’s decorations. This tunic displays SEVEN sets of loops. Some contain two loops, while others have three. The loop sets that I have artificially designated as “one” and “three” are of the size that could sustain a larger decoration, possibly a breast star. Loop sets “two” and “four” are probably designed for an Iron Cross 1st Class and possibly a wound badge. Loops “five,” “six,” and “seven” are also large and could carry larger pinback decorations or breast stars.

It is my opinion that at LEAST two breast stars were worn on five of the loop sets, while the balance would have accommodated a larger decoration. I have some other “guesstimations.” For a man to have this many orders and decorations, we are quite possibly looking at a member of royalty. Considering its relatively low rank versus the high number of awards, I think we could be looking at a young Prinz or Graf. This theory is enhanced by the second tunic, which follows below.

The tunic’s interior is finished in fine gray silk. It has a total of four interior pockets: three on the left and one on the right. The tunic’s condition is excellent both inside and out. I can detect NO moth damage. The tunic has been well preserved for the last nearly one-hundred-years. It is a superb tunic for any collection, especially if coupled with its mate.

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Description

(MEDALS NOT INCLUDED)  This is a superb M-1915 feldgrau officer’s tunic from Infanterie-Regiment Alt-Württemberg (3. Württ.) Nr 121. The regiment was founded in 1716 and garrisoned at Ludwigsburg. It was attached to the Württemberg XIII. Armeekorps.

The feldbluse tunic is easily distinguished from other tunic styles by a frontal flap that covers its buttons, leaving no buttons visible down the tunic’s center. A total of six simple gray buttons is in its center. Once they have been buttoned, an inner flap is laid down, followed by the exterior flap, and “Ausgezeichnet!” the tunic appears to have no center buttons! This creates a very tidy layout that was favored by some officers, however, it was not as popular as the M-1910, M-1915, etc. tunic-styles.

The tunic’s exterior features two pockets that are secured by two small subdued, crowned buttons. The same small buttons secure its shoulder boards. Each shoulder board displays a “121” that identifies the regiment, along with a Hauptmann’s twin pips. The exterior’s final two buttons appear on the reverse in the vent area. They are larger than the other four buttons, the size that normally is visible running down the tunic’s center.
The shoulder boards are the sewn-in variety, which was quite common among Leutnant’s, Oberleutnant’s, and Hauptmann’s ranks. One side is sewn into the tunic and the other is attached by a button. Each shoulder board has a white underlay. The shoulder boards are of the M-1915 feldgrau variety. The chevrons atop the shoulder boards are both black and red, which is indicative of Württemberg. The tunic’s collar is also feldgrau, which is quite interesting.

One other very important area on the tunic’s left chest elevates this tunic to the realm of the VERY, VERY special. The top left breast area sports large set of horizontally sewn-in loops for a massive ribbon bar. Based on these dimensions I believe that a MINIMUM eight-to-ten decorations appeared on the actual ribbon bar. Just below this area, the tunic gets even better!

Typically, most tunics sport two or three sets of loops for its owner’s decorations. This tunic displays SEVEN sets of loops. Some contain two loops, while others have three. The loop sets that I have artificially designated as “one” and “three” are of the size that could sustain a larger decoration, possibly a breast star. Loop sets “two” and “four” are probably designed for an Iron Cross 1st Class and possibly a wound badge. Loops “five,” “six,” and “seven” are also large and could carry larger pinback decorations or breast stars.

It is my opinion that at LEAST two breast stars were worn on five of the loop sets, while the balance would have accommodated a larger decoration. I have some other “guesstimations.” For a man to have this many orders and decorations, we are quite possibly looking at a member of royalty. Considering its relatively low rank versus the high number of awards, I think we could be looking at a young Prinz or Graf. This theory is enhanced by the second tunic, which follows below.

The tunic’s interior is finished in fine gray silk. It has a total of four interior pockets: three on the left and one on the right. The tunic’s condition is excellent both inside and out. I can detect NO moth damage. The tunic has been well preserved for the last nearly one-hundred-years. It is a superb tunic for any collection, especially if coupled with its mate.