Previous Page

M-1915 GENERALARZT FELDBLUSE FELDGRAU TUNIC – PRUSSIA

SKU: 15-490

$5,995.00

We are always pleased to bring you feldgrau tunics. It is an especially good day for us when we offer an example that once belonged to a General. This example is a very different sort of tunic. It was once the property of a “Generalarzt,” that is, a doctor who was also a General Officer. I can assure you, the German Army, did NOT have many Generals who were doctors. A man in this rank would have been assigned at a very high level, perhaps at an Armee or Armee Gruppe. He might also have been on staff at the high command. It would not have been for a man out in the field. He would have overseen medical services at a very high level. The tunic is a M-1915 Feldbluse. This tunic is completely different from other tunic types (including the M-1910) in that all of its center buttons are hidden from view behind a flap. This presents a smooth exterior. A total of six gray buttons hides beneath the flap. The cuffs feature no adornment, either. The tunic does not have conventional General officer’s kragenspiegel mounted on a different shade of (darker) gray collar. Instead, the kragenspiegel are silver and bullion, with a dark-blue background trimmed in red. The shoulder boards are quite large. They are of the subdued M-1915 variety for use on feldgrau tunics. They consist of silver bullion interwoven with black cords. Their centers boast gilt caducei. The shoulder boards’ underlays are the same blue that we see on the kragenspiegel. They are of the slip-on variety. A small, subdued button holds them in place. The tunic’s left breast displays two sets of sewn-in loops. The loops could have held a 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class or the EK 1st Class equivalent from another state. [In our photos we show an Iron Cross 1st Class attached. It is an example ONLY, and does NOT come with the tunic]. A five-place ribbon bar sits above the sewn-in loops. Five loops are present and the one on the end is not utilized. It is possible that the ribbon bar is not original to the tunic. This is the way I received it, however, so this is how I am offering it to you. The tunic’s reverse shows two more subdued buttons in the vent area. The tunic’s exterior condition is very pleasing. Some limited areas of moth tracking appear, but no full nips that I can detect. Inside the tunic is a full cotton liner, rather than silk. I surmise it is a late-war tunic based on several details, and its wool. It is not the same buttery feldgrau material that one sees in WW I’s early and mid years. This is a rare opportunity to acquire a General medical officer’s feldgrau tunic.


Description

We are always pleased to bring you feldgrau tunics. It is an especially good day for us when we offer an example that once belonged to a General. This example is a very different sort of tunic. It was once the property of a “Generalarzt,” that is, a doctor who was also a General Officer. I can assure you, the German Army, did NOT have many Generals who were doctors. A man in this rank would have been assigned at a very high level, perhaps at an Armee or Armee Gruppe. He might also have been on staff at the high command. It would not have been for a man out in the field. He would have overseen medical services at a very high level. The tunic is a M-1915 Feldbluse. This tunic is completely different from other tunic types (including the M-1910) in that all of its center buttons are hidden from view behind a flap. This presents a smooth exterior. A total of six gray buttons hides beneath the flap. The cuffs feature no adornment, either. The tunic does not have conventional General officer’s kragenspiegel mounted on a different shade of (darker) gray collar. Instead, the kragenspiegel are silver and bullion, with a dark-blue background trimmed in red. The shoulder boards are quite large. They are of the subdued M-1915 variety for use on feldgrau tunics. They consist of silver bullion interwoven with black cords. Their centers boast gilt caducei. The shoulder boards’ underlays are the same blue that we see on the kragenspiegel. They are of the slip-on variety. A small, subdued button holds them in place. The tunic’s left breast displays two sets of sewn-in loops. The loops could have held a 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class or the EK 1st Class equivalent from another state. [In our photos we show an Iron Cross 1st Class attached. It is an example ONLY, and does NOT come with the tunic]. A five-place ribbon bar sits above the sewn-in loops. Five loops are present and the one on the end is not utilized. It is possible that the ribbon bar is not original to the tunic. This is the way I received it, however, so this is how I am offering it to you. The tunic’s reverse shows two more subdued buttons in the vent area. The tunic’s exterior condition is very pleasing. Some limited areas of moth tracking appear, but no full nips that I can detect. Inside the tunic is a full cotton liner, rather than silk. I surmise it is a late-war tunic based on several details, and its wool. It is not the same buttery feldgrau material that one sees in WW I’s early and mid years. This is a rare opportunity to acquire a General medical officer’s feldgrau tunic.