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PRUSSIA – DRESS KOLLAR AND SASH – OFFICER’S – KÜRAßIER-REGIMENT Nr 4

SKU: 15-675 XAS

$2,495.00 $1,695.00

This is a consignment item. It is an officer’s Küraßier-Regiment von Driesen (Westfälisches) Nr 4 dress tunic (koller), which was worn at formal affairs and parades. The regiment was founded in 1717 and garrisoned at Münster, where it was attached to the VII. Armeekorps.
Küraßier and Jäger zu Pferde’s dress tunics were unlike those of all the other troops, even those from other Kavallerie Regiments (the Ulanen’s ulankas and the Husaren’s attilas). The difference lies in the Küraßier and Jäger zu Pferde’s collar design and the way its decorative trim is arranged. The trim (in regimental colors) is used on the koller’s front, collar and cuffs, and is referred to as borte (border). When you look at the photos that accompany this selection, you will note that the collar and its trim are rounded from the collar’s upper section to the midpoint where it flows down into the borte decorating the koller’s front. You will also notice that the koller has NO visible buttons on its front. Instead, the borte conceals a hook and eye system beneath it so that the tunic front presents a smooth appearance once everything is secured. It is an extremely elegant design.
The koller is made of fine white wool. The each tunic half’s front sports the previously-mentioned, regimentally-correct, red and silver bullion borte running from collar-to-bottom down its center edge. Furthermore, the same borte adorns each cuff, along with two silver-toned buttons on each sleeve.
The koller comes with two correct, very fine epaulettes. Each epaulette sports a silver and black bullion passant across its tongue where it attaches to the half-moon. [A passant is the small shoulder strap that runs parallel to the tunic’s shoulder seam to attach an epaulette to the uniform]. The latter may indicate that the wearer retired from the regiment as a Leutnant der Reserve. The metal fittings (moons) are silver-toned, while the epaulettes’ centers display the same unadorned white wool as the tunic. The epaulettes’ backing is red. The epaulettes are in excellent condition. Thin red piping traces a design on the koller’s reverse that descends from the shoulder seams down the back to the waistline, then onto the vent area to accent the six plain silver buttons on display. The same red piping accents each sleeve back from the shoulder seam to the cuff’s borte.
The tunic’s interior displays a rather unusual padded design covered with silk. This silk has suffered some shredding, especially in the top center. A bit more shredding is visible in the vent area. Some black numbers and letters are visible on the interior tunic sleeve and just below the shredding in the top center. [I believe these are postwar costume house marks. Many Great War tunics made their way into costume houses for the theater and burgeoning film industries in Europe and the USA. I once had a tunic that was marked for a Los Angeles, California costume house, including a six-digit telephone number! (U.S. telephone numbers did not convert to the current seven digits until after WW II)].
A silver-toned brocade dress sash (in very fine condition) is included with the koller. The tunic’s overall condition is quite pleasing. Even though white material often does not age well, this tunic has NOT suffered extensive soiling. It is an excellent representation of its kind.


Description

This is a consignment item. It is an officer’s Küraßier-Regiment von Driesen (Westfälisches) Nr 4 dress tunic (koller), which was worn at formal affairs and parades. The regiment was founded in 1717 and garrisoned at Münster, where it was attached to the VII. Armeekorps.
Küraßier and Jäger zu Pferde’s dress tunics were unlike those of all the other troops, even those from other Kavallerie Regiments (the Ulanen’s ulankas and the Husaren’s attilas). The difference lies in the Küraßier and Jäger zu Pferde’s collar design and the way its decorative trim is arranged. The trim (in regimental colors) is used on the koller’s front, collar and cuffs, and is referred to as borte (border). When you look at the photos that accompany this selection, you will note that the collar and its trim are rounded from the collar’s upper section to the midpoint where it flows down into the borte decorating the koller’s front. You will also notice that the koller has NO visible buttons on its front. Instead, the borte conceals a hook and eye system beneath it so that the tunic front presents a smooth appearance once everything is secured. It is an extremely elegant design.
The koller is made of fine white wool. The each tunic half’s front sports the previously-mentioned, regimentally-correct, red and silver bullion borte running from collar-to-bottom down its center edge. Furthermore, the same borte adorns each cuff, along with two silver-toned buttons on each sleeve.
The koller comes with two correct, very fine epaulettes. Each epaulette sports a silver and black bullion passant across its tongue where it attaches to the half-moon. [A passant is the small shoulder strap that runs parallel to the tunic’s shoulder seam to attach an epaulette to the uniform]. The latter may indicate that the wearer retired from the regiment as a Leutnant der Reserve. The metal fittings (moons) are silver-toned, while the epaulettes’ centers display the same unadorned white wool as the tunic. The epaulettes’ backing is red. The epaulettes are in excellent condition. Thin red piping traces a design on the koller’s reverse that descends from the shoulder seams down the back to the waistline, then onto the vent area to accent the six plain silver buttons on display. The same red piping accents each sleeve back from the shoulder seam to the cuff’s borte.
The tunic’s interior displays a rather unusual padded design covered with silk. This silk has suffered some shredding, especially in the top center. A bit more shredding is visible in the vent area. Some black numbers and letters are visible on the interior tunic sleeve and just below the shredding in the top center. [I believe these are postwar costume house marks. Many Great War tunics made their way into costume houses for the theater and burgeoning film industries in Europe and the USA. I once had a tunic that was marked for a Los Angeles, California costume house, including a six-digit telephone number! (U.S. telephone numbers did not convert to the current seven digits until after WW II)].
A silver-toned brocade dress sash (in very fine condition) is included with the koller. The tunic’s overall condition is quite pleasing. Even though white material often does not age well, this tunic has NOT suffered extensive soiling. It is an excellent representation of its kind.