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KNIGHTHOOD PRESENTATION DOCUMENT SET FROM KAISER WILHELM I’S ERA – PRUSSIA

SKU: 20-110

$6,495.00

This is the formal presentation set awarded to men who were elevated to Prussian knighthood. This very elaborate set consists of a hand carved wooden box for the Adelsbrief. This was the formal document recognizing the newly-elevated knight. The ornately hand carved storage box depicts the Hohenzollern Eagle on its outer lid. The box is secured by a lock and key. This is the first such relic I have owned that still has its key. The box measures 17 ½” x 14″ x 5.” Even on its own, this box is most impressive! In addition to the intricately carved Hohenzollern Eagle on the lid, elaborate carving decorates all the box’s surfaces. Inside, a floral silk insert graces the upper lid. A sumptuous red, leather, bound folio, measuring 14 ½ ” x 11,” encases the formal knighthood document. Again, the Hohenzollern Eagle is seen embossed in gilt on the folio’s cover. Each of the document’s eight pages is made of the finest heavy velum that could be obtained at the time, (or today, for that matter). The text is rendered by a master calligrapher. The basic information is listed for Franz Albert Philipp Wittcke. His name is mentioned in that manner on several occasions until we finally see Franz Albert Philipp von Wittcke. Von Wittcke was a retired hauptmann in the Landwehr Bataillon. The full-color coat-of-arms, which was created exclusively for the von Wittcke family, is the central theme within the folio. The hand painting on the velum remains vibrant even after 130+ years. It is truly a work of art. This document hails from around 1873, when many officers retiring from the army were awarded for their faithful service to the crown, especially in light of the recently completed Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. The bold signature of Kaiser Wilhelm I appears on the final page of the document. Also appearing is the signature of Graf Schulenburg, an official of the court. The final piece of this presentation set is a silver canister, measuring 6″ in diameter. This canister displays Wilhelm I’s crowned cypher, along with the Latin motto “Suum Cuique”. Further, we see “Gott Mit Uns.” Inside should be a red wax seal displaying the House of Hohenzollern’s Coat-of-Arms. Although the red wax device is present, it shows no evidence of the Hohenzollern Coat-of-Arms! This is just a minor quirk. These sets are amazingly difficult-to-find. This is one of the most display-worthy examples that I have ever offered.

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Description

This is the formal presentation set awarded to men who were elevated to Prussian knighthood. This very elaborate set consists of a hand carved wooden box for the Adelsbrief. This was the formal document recognizing the newly-elevated knight. The ornately hand carved storage box depicts the Hohenzollern Eagle on its outer lid. The box is secured by a lock and key. This is the first such relic I have owned that still has its key. The box measures 17 ½” x 14″ x 5.” Even on its own, this box is most impressive! In addition to the intricately carved Hohenzollern Eagle on the lid, elaborate carving decorates all the box’s surfaces. Inside, a floral silk insert graces the upper lid. A sumptuous red, leather, bound folio, measuring 14 ½ ” x 11,” encases the formal knighthood document. Again, the Hohenzollern Eagle is seen embossed in gilt on the folio’s cover. Each of the document’s eight pages is made of the finest heavy velum that could be obtained at the time, (or today, for that matter). The text is rendered by a master calligrapher. The basic information is listed for Franz Albert Philipp Wittcke. His name is mentioned in that manner on several occasions until we finally see Franz Albert Philipp von Wittcke. Von Wittcke was a retired hauptmann in the Landwehr Bataillon. The full-color coat-of-arms, which was created exclusively for the von Wittcke family, is the central theme within the folio. The hand painting on the velum remains vibrant even after 130+ years. It is truly a work of art. This document hails from around 1873, when many officers retiring from the army were awarded for their faithful service to the crown, especially in light of the recently completed Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. The bold signature of Kaiser Wilhelm I appears on the final page of the document. Also appearing is the signature of Graf Schulenburg, an official of the court. The final piece of this presentation set is a silver canister, measuring 6″ in diameter. This canister displays Wilhelm I’s crowned cypher, along with the Latin motto “Suum Cuique”. Further, we see “Gott Mit Uns.” Inside should be a red wax seal displaying the House of Hohenzollern’s Coat-of-Arms. Although the red wax device is present, it shows no evidence of the Hohenzollern Coat-of-Arms! This is just a minor quirk. These sets are amazingly difficult-to-find. This is one of the most display-worthy examples that I have ever offered.