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PRUSSIA – TSCHAKO – ENLISTED REGIMENTAL BAND MEMBER – JÄGER-BATAILLON Nr 10 – FULL PARADE CONFIGURATION

SKU: 33-294

$5,995.00

This is a Hannoversches Jäger-Bataillon Nr 10 NCO’s tschako from a Hanoverian unit (originally, it was absorbed by Prussia in 1866). The Bataillon was formed in 1803, garrisoned at Goslar, and assigned to the X. Armeekorps. [In the past, we have shared the Jäger-Bataillon’s role within the German Army. When it came to marksmanship, these Bataillons were (collectively) the German Army’s best. Most of them were formed in the mid 18th and early 19th centuries. Some of the very early Prussian Bataillone fought with Frederick the Great. All of them, and those formed during Friedrich Wilhelm III’s reign, fought throughout the Napoleonic Wars. Their role was to advance in front of their army’s main body. When possible, they engaged the opposing army’s officers and NCO’s, disrupting the opposition’s front-line command and control structure. As these men were the best shots, they were given early versions of rifles that boasted a greater range and accuracy than the front-line infantry regiments’ muskets]. While not a Prussian unit during the Napoleonic Wars, no one had a prouder record than the Kingdom of Hannover’s Jäger-Bataillon Nr 10. In the Napoleonic Wars, Jäger-Bataillon Nr 10 served in both the Peninsula Campaign and in June 1815’s penultimate Battle of Waterloo. At the conclusion of the 1866 Austro-Prussian War, Hannover’s territory and army were incorporated into Prussia’s victorious kingdom. This concluded Germany’s reorganization, leaving Prussia as the dominant power under Wilhelm I’s and von Bismarck’s leadership. After the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War, Wilhelm I was named Germany’s first Kaiser. His grandson, Kaiser Wilhelm II, restored the former Hanoverian regiments’ (including Jäger-Bataillon Nr 10) Napoleonic battle honors in 1897, allowing them to display the Peninsula and Waterloo bandeaux on their headdresses once more.
Our tschako’s leather body is in very fine condition. Its wappen, with its crowned eagle encircled by the Peninsula and Waterloo bandeaux, and its chin scales are gold-toned. As is correct, only the single Reich’s kokarde appears on its right side (from the wearer’s perspective). Inside the helmet, is a typical enlisted man. All of the liner’s leather tongues are in place, as is the original leather sizing thong.
Returning to the tschako’s exterior, we see a correct Prussian in the front (this is where this example gets very interesting). Slipped into the same slit as the Feldzeichen is a parade bush’s trichter. The parade bush is red, which means it is for a musician or other personnel assigned to the Bataillon’s band. The parade bush and the gold trichter are in very fine condition. A little curry combing would help make the bush fuller again. You can now see that this is one of the rarest Jäger Bataillon tschakos that we could ever offer to you and it is in excellent condition overall.

Our photo has mistakenly shown the parade bush and trichter installed backwards. That can easily be taken care of by turning it around.


Description

This is a Hannoversches Jäger-Bataillon Nr 10 NCO’s tschako from a Hanoverian unit (originally, it was absorbed by Prussia in 1866). The Bataillon was formed in 1803, garrisoned at Goslar, and assigned to the X. Armeekorps. [In the past, we have shared the Jäger-Bataillon’s role within the German Army. When it came to marksmanship, these Bataillons were (collectively) the German Army’s best. Most of them were formed in the mid 18th and early 19th centuries. Some of the very early Prussian Bataillone fought with Frederick the Great. All of them, and those formed during Friedrich Wilhelm III’s reign, fought throughout the Napoleonic Wars. Their role was to advance in front of their army’s main body. When possible, they engaged the opposing army’s officers and NCO’s, disrupting the opposition’s front-line command and control structure. As these men were the best shots, they were given early versions of rifles that boasted a greater range and accuracy than the front-line infantry regiments’ muskets]. While not a Prussian unit during the Napoleonic Wars, no one had a prouder record than the Kingdom of Hannover’s Jäger-Bataillon Nr 10. In the Napoleonic Wars, Jäger-Bataillon Nr 10 served in both the Peninsula Campaign and in June 1815’s penultimate Battle of Waterloo. At the conclusion of the 1866 Austro-Prussian War, Hannover’s territory and army were incorporated into Prussia’s victorious kingdom. This concluded Germany’s reorganization, leaving Prussia as the dominant power under Wilhelm I’s and von Bismarck’s leadership. After the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War, Wilhelm I was named Germany’s first Kaiser. His grandson, Kaiser Wilhelm II, restored the former Hanoverian regiments’ (including Jäger-Bataillon Nr 10) Napoleonic battle honors in 1897, allowing them to display the Peninsula and Waterloo bandeaux on their headdresses once more.
Our tschako’s leather body is in very fine condition. Its wappen, with its crowned eagle encircled by the Peninsula and Waterloo bandeaux, and its chin scales are gold-toned. As is correct, only the single Reich’s kokarde appears on its right side (from the wearer’s perspective). Inside the helmet, is a typical enlisted man. All of the liner’s leather tongues are in place, as is the original leather sizing thong.
Returning to the tschako’s exterior, we see a correct Prussian in the front (this is where this example gets very interesting). Slipped into the same slit as the Feldzeichen is a parade bush’s trichter. The parade bush is red, which means it is for a musician or other personnel assigned to the Bataillon’s band. The parade bush and the gold trichter are in very fine condition. A little curry combing would help make the bush fuller again. You can now see that this is one of the rarest Jäger Bataillon tschakos that we could ever offer to you and it is in excellent condition overall.

Our photo has mistakenly shown the parade bush and trichter installed backwards. That can easily be taken care of by turning it around.