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IDENTIFIED NAVY OFFICER SWORD

SKU: 13-625

$2,095.00

This is a typical naval officer’s sword in good condition. It measures 36″ in length from its lionshead’s top to the bottom of the drag. The triple-wire wrapped grip looks like it might be made of walrus tusk rather than ivory. It sports some dark striations that make me suspect this, but I am no ivory/walrus tusk expert! The lionshead does not have glass chips for eyes, just a plain brass finish. The sword hilt’s folding lock mechanism is engraved with the owner’s last name, Röder. A quick look in one of my German naval research works revealed his full name was Alfred Röder. He entered the Kaiserliche Marine in 1912. He later saw service as a Kriegsoffizier with Lehrkommando 350, in July 1944. His rank was as an Oberleutnant zur See. I did not find information on his WW I service in my brief search.
The blade, which measures 30 ½” is engraved with naval designs. The engraving is somewhat faded from age. The blade has several small black spots on it where it is slightly corroded. They do not detract from the blade’s overall appearance. The manufacturer’s name is listed on the blade’s non cutting edge, but has been somewhat obscured by one of the black marks. It reads “obrecht Hoflieferant Berlin.” Hoflieferant means “purveyor to the king’s court.” The leather scabbard is in pleasing condition. It has the traditional two leather sections with three brass trim and adornment areas. Two scabbard rings are present.
Overall, it is a well made, engaging naval officer’s sword.


Description

This is a typical naval officer’s sword in good condition. It measures 36″ in length from its lionshead’s top to the bottom of the drag. The triple-wire wrapped grip looks like it might be made of walrus tusk rather than ivory. It sports some dark striations that make me suspect this, but I am no ivory/walrus tusk expert! The lionshead does not have glass chips for eyes, just a plain brass finish. The sword hilt’s folding lock mechanism is engraved with the owner’s last name, Röder. A quick look in one of my German naval research works revealed his full name was Alfred Röder. He entered the Kaiserliche Marine in 1912. He later saw service as a Kriegsoffizier with Lehrkommando 350, in July 1944. His rank was as an Oberleutnant zur See. I did not find information on his WW I service in my brief search.
The blade, which measures 30 ½” is engraved with naval designs. The engraving is somewhat faded from age. The blade has several small black spots on it where it is slightly corroded. They do not detract from the blade’s overall appearance. The manufacturer’s name is listed on the blade’s non cutting edge, but has been somewhat obscured by one of the black marks. It reads “obrecht Hoflieferant Berlin.” Hoflieferant means “purveyor to the king’s court.” The leather scabbard is in pleasing condition. It has the traditional two leather sections with three brass trim and adornment areas. Two scabbard rings are present.
Overall, it is a well made, engaging naval officer’s sword.

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