Previous Page

IRON CROSS – 1914 – 1st CLASS –  IDENTIFIED – WITH ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE AND CARDBOARD SHIPPING CARTON

SKU: 09-987

$995.00

IRON CROSS – 1914 – 1st CLASS –  IDENTIFIED – WITH ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE AND CARDBOARD SHIPPING CARTON

We are very pleased to offer this 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class, complete with its original presentation case AND the cardboard carton in which it was shipped. While a certain number of decorations that appear in today’s market still have their presentation cases, finding one that also has its original cardboard shipping carton is far rarer. Naturally, the shipping carton helped protect the presentation case from scratches, but also was intended to thwart its theft. The simple brown carton measures 1″ x 2 ½” x 3.” A small 2 ½” x 2 ½” white label pasted to its exterior has the message listed below. It identifies the Iron Cross and warns that it may only be opened by its recipient.

“Eisernes Kreuz
1. Klasse
Nur von dem Beliehenen
zu öffnen”

A red and black paper seal that once securely fastened the package on its way to the recipient is also included. The latter specified that it had originated from the “Preuss. General. Ordenskom.” Essentially, the box was not to be opened until it reached its correct recipient. The shipping carton is complete. The flap is complete. The black leatherette presentation case displays a gold Iron Cross on its outer lid. The case’s interior sports a white silk upper lid. A fitted black velvet base allows the pin to drop down and keep the Iron Cross flush. The case closes flush and is well secured. The Iron Cross is of the flat design that is consistent with issued Iron Crosses.
While the Iron Cross and presentation case are lovely, the real value here lies in the simple brown cardboard carton that protects it. How many people would save the box once they received their award? Although more recipients saved their presentation cases, a good number of them were also discarded with the cardboard container. These two simple boxes bring a great deal of interest and value to the 1914 Iron Cross itself.
The one other key issue here is that the Iron Cross is actually identified and dated. The original recipient was a Hauptmann Denhard. Following his name is “5/2.” This tells us that he was in the 5th Kompagnie of the 2nd Battalion of an unknown regiment. Further research may reveal the regiment’s identity, as well as additional information about Hauptmann Denhard. His EK 1 award date was 17 November 1914. An early war award like this is significant. It would be fascinating to find how long Denhard lived during the war, and what further rank and responsibility he might have received. This would make a major addition to any collection.


Description

IRON CROSS – 1914 – 1st CLASS –  IDENTIFIED – WITH ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE AND CARDBOARD SHIPPING CARTON

We are very pleased to offer this 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class, complete with its original presentation case AND the cardboard carton in which it was shipped. While a certain number of decorations that appear in today’s market still have their presentation cases, finding one that also has its original cardboard shipping carton is far rarer. Naturally, the shipping carton helped protect the presentation case from scratches, but also was intended to thwart its theft. The simple brown carton measures 1″ x 2 ½” x 3.” A small 2 ½” x 2 ½” white label pasted to its exterior has the message listed below. It identifies the Iron Cross and warns that it may only be opened by its recipient.

“Eisernes Kreuz
1. Klasse
Nur von dem Beliehenen
zu öffnen”

A red and black paper seal that once securely fastened the package on its way to the recipient is also included. The latter specified that it had originated from the “Preuss. General. Ordenskom.” Essentially, the box was not to be opened until it reached its correct recipient. The shipping carton is complete. The flap is complete. The black leatherette presentation case displays a gold Iron Cross on its outer lid. The case’s interior sports a white silk upper lid. A fitted black velvet base allows the pin to drop down and keep the Iron Cross flush. The case closes flush and is well secured. The Iron Cross is of the flat design that is consistent with issued Iron Crosses.
While the Iron Cross and presentation case are lovely, the real value here lies in the simple brown cardboard carton that protects it. How many people would save the box once they received their award? Although more recipients saved their presentation cases, a good number of them were also discarded with the cardboard container. These two simple boxes bring a great deal of interest and value to the 1914 Iron Cross itself.
The one other key issue here is that the Iron Cross is actually identified and dated. The original recipient was a Hauptmann Denhard. Following his name is “5/2.” This tells us that he was in the 5th Kompagnie of the 2nd Battalion of an unknown regiment. Further research may reveal the regiment’s identity, as well as additional information about Hauptmann Denhard. His EK 1 award date was 17 November 1914. An early war award like this is significant. It would be fascinating to find how long Denhard lived during the war, and what further rank and responsibility he might have received. This would make a major addition to any collection.

%d bloggers like this: