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HINDENBURG CROSS FOR NEXT-OF-KIN

SKU: 05-1667

$40.00

The Hindenburg Cross was initiated in three classes after President and former Generalfeldmarschall Paul von Hindenburg died in 1934. The medal was issued to honor participants who served in the Great War and their families. The first class was intended for actual front-line soldiers, and was awarded WITH swords. The second medal was awarded WITHOUT swords for Non Combatants. Both medals are bronze-toned and feature the dates 1914 and 1918 encircled with a wreath. They were presented with an award document that typically was issued through the local police department.
The third example was the Hindenburg Cross for Next-of-Kin, popularly known as the Widow’s Cross. It was painted black to represent mourning a loved one. Its ribbon also was different from the Combatant’s and Non Combatant’s awards. It also had the 1914 and 1918 dates within a wreath. In all cases, the decorations’ reverses were blank except for manufacturers’ hallmarks.
Our example today of the Hindenburg Cross for next of kin is in very fine condition, with a correct and original ribbon in place.


Description

The Hindenburg Cross was initiated in three classes after President and former Generalfeldmarschall Paul von Hindenburg died in 1934. The medal was issued to honor participants who served in the Great War and their families. The first class was intended for actual front-line soldiers, and was awarded WITH swords. The second medal was awarded WITHOUT swords for Non Combatants. Both medals are bronze-toned and feature the dates 1914 and 1918 encircled with a wreath. They were presented with an award document that typically was issued through the local police department.
The third example was the Hindenburg Cross for Next-of-Kin, popularly known as the Widow’s Cross. It was painted black to represent mourning a loved one. Its ribbon also was different from the Combatant’s and Non Combatant’s awards. It also had the 1914 and 1918 dates within a wreath. In all cases, the decorations’ reverses were blank except for manufacturers’ hallmarks.
Our example today of the Hindenburg Cross for next of kin is in very fine condition, with a correct and original ribbon in place.