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SAXE-COBURG-GOTHA – PICKELHAUBE – ENLISTED MAN – 6. THÜRINGISCHES INFANTERIE-REGIMENT Nr 95

SKU: 04-637

$1,895.00

While we generally prefer to offer officers’ helmets, we will make exceptions. One of our exceptions is for an enlisted men’s helmet from a state that fielded a single regiment. This very fine enlisted men’s pickelhaube from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha’s 6. Thüringisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 95 exactly fits the bill. The regiment was raised in 1807. Its three Bataillons were located in different cities: Bataillon Nr 1 was in Gotha, Bataillon Nr 2 was in Hildburghausen, and Bataillon Nr 3 was in Coburg. The regiment was attached to the XI. Armeekorps, along with other Saxon regiments.
Although a couple of small areas on the helmet’s leather reveal some minor scrapes and depressions, the exterior is in astoundingly good condition for a one-hundred-plus years-old enlisted men’s helmet. The helmet appears to have been privately-purchased, as I can detect NO depot markings. This fact also speaks to its condition, as a single owner would have taken much better care of his possession than a series of depot-assignees. All the furniture is gilt, with the exception of the crowned, Saxon Coat-of-Arms appearing in the wappen’s center. The Coat-of-Arms is placed on what I refer to as a sunburst design. Both the sunburst and the Coat-of-Arms are silver. If you peek under the sunburst, you will note the word “Fürst” rather than “König.” Otherwise, the wappen looks like a standard Prussian emblem, except for its telltale, Saxon “Fürst.” The spike is NOT removable on this helmet. The state and Reich’s kokarden are properly in place. We also see an excellent, original, leather chinstrap with prewar brass fittings.
The helmet’s interior is every bit as attractive as its exterior. As previously mentioned, I see no marks on the rear visor that would indicate a regimentally-issued helmet. The enlisted men’s leather sweatband is present and complete, with all its tongues in place. The liner’s sizing thong is NOT in attendance. The wappen is held in place with a simple leather thong that slides through its hoop. One of the thongs is not present. The other leather piece keeps the wappen secure, so it is not a major problem.
This is a fine enlisted men’s spiked helmet. It would make a fine companion piece if you already have an officer helmet for the regiment. Whether as a companion piece or a standalone, it is a fantastic piece of headdress.


Description

While we generally prefer to offer officers’ helmets, we will make exceptions. One of our exceptions is for an enlisted men’s helmet from a state that fielded a single regiment. This very fine enlisted men’s pickelhaube from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha’s 6. Thüringisches Infanterie-Regiment Nr 95 exactly fits the bill. The regiment was raised in 1807. Its three Bataillons were located in different cities: Bataillon Nr 1 was in Gotha, Bataillon Nr 2 was in Hildburghausen, and Bataillon Nr 3 was in Coburg. The regiment was attached to the XI. Armeekorps, along with other Saxon regiments.
Although a couple of small areas on the helmet’s leather reveal some minor scrapes and depressions, the exterior is in astoundingly good condition for a one-hundred-plus years-old enlisted men’s helmet. The helmet appears to have been privately-purchased, as I can detect NO depot markings. This fact also speaks to its condition, as a single owner would have taken much better care of his possession than a series of depot-assignees. All the furniture is gilt, with the exception of the crowned, Saxon Coat-of-Arms appearing in the wappen’s center. The Coat-of-Arms is placed on what I refer to as a sunburst design. Both the sunburst and the Coat-of-Arms are silver. If you peek under the sunburst, you will note the word “Fürst” rather than “König.” Otherwise, the wappen looks like a standard Prussian emblem, except for its telltale, Saxon “Fürst.” The spike is NOT removable on this helmet. The state and Reich’s kokarden are properly in place. We also see an excellent, original, leather chinstrap with prewar brass fittings.
The helmet’s interior is every bit as attractive as its exterior. As previously mentioned, I see no marks on the rear visor that would indicate a regimentally-issued helmet. The enlisted men’s leather sweatband is present and complete, with all its tongues in place. The liner’s sizing thong is NOT in attendance. The wappen is held in place with a simple leather thong that slides through its hoop. One of the thongs is not present. The other leather piece keeps the wappen secure, so it is not a major problem.
This is a fine enlisted men’s spiked helmet. It would make a fine companion piece if you already have an officer helmet for the regiment. Whether as a companion piece or a standalone, it is a fantastic piece of headdress.