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ENLISTED MAN’S PRIVATELY-PURCHASED KÜRAßIER-REGIMENT Nr 2 KOLLER – PRUSSIA

SKU: 50-05

$3,195.00 $1,995.00

It is an enlisted man’s Küraßier-Regiment Königin (Pommersches) Nr 2 “koller” (the regimental tunic for Prussian Küraßier or Jäger zu Pferde units). Küraßier-Regiment Königin (Pommersches) Nr 2 was among Prussia’s most-elite Küraßier-Regiments. It was founded in 1717, garrisoned at Pasewalk, and attached to the II. Armeekorps. Its Regimental Chef was the Kaiserin, Augusta Viktoria (1858-1921), who was also Königin of Prussia. [The Kaiserin’s eldest son, Kronprinz Wilhelm, was associated with the regiment as an à la Suite officer, as he was with 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1 and 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß]. The regiment displayed special emblems on its gilt-toned küraßes pertaining to battle honors granted it from a key battle in the 1745 War of Austrian Succession, 4 June’s Battle of Hohenfriedberg. [Frederick the Great led his Prussians against a large force of Austrians and Saxons at Hohenfriedberg. It was a total rout]. In addition to displaying the special devices on their küraßes, the regiment boasted bandeaux on their spiked helmets with the battle’s name and date. [The device featured a Hohenzollern Crown surrounded by regimental flags representing the sixty-seven Austrian and Saxon flags/standards captured at Hohenfriedberg.
As indicated above, the “koller” tunic style was worn ONLY by Küraßier and Jäger zu Pferde Regiments. The term referenced their tunics’ uniquely-shaped collars. [Another connection between the two regiment types was their extended-rear-visored metal helmets, which were designed to protect their wearers’ necks]. While the Gardes du Corps (GdC) was considered to be the Imperial German Army’s top-of-the-line unit, the Garde-Küraßier Regiment, along with the Leib-Küraßier-Regiment Großer Kurfürst (Schlesisches) Nr 1, and Küraßier-Regiment Königin Nr 2, were all close behind. The tunic is made of fine white wool and features the special “küraßier collar.” A double row of red trim bands extends down the tunic’s center from its collar to its hem. A fascinating feature of küraßier tunics is that they do NOT employ buttons to close their tunic fronts. Instead, a series of hooks and eyes are concealed beneath the central trim bands, joining the tunic’s two halves underneath a smooth exterior.
The koller’s cuffs display red trim bands accented with white litzen, each of which boasts a silver-toned button. The white shoulder straps are trimmed in red, and feature a crowned royal cypher (“L”) on each strap. The tunic’s right sleeve sports an inverted red “V,” indicating that the wearer had qualified for Lance Proficiency 3rd Class. Outlines of two former “V’s” are still present, probably from earning other, lower proficiency awards.
The tunic’s reverse displays red trim bands extending down to the vent flap. The vent flap itself is decorated by six silver-toned buttons. No depot markings are evident inside the tunic, meaning it was privately-purchased (even enlisted members of elite regiments frequently did this). The liner is made of white silk that is in excellent condition. A name is very faintly penciled into its collar, but I cannot decipher it.
Overall, the tunic is in very good condition. Some scattered moth tracks and moth nips show on its front and back. Due to its white color, some soiling is present. It remains a VERY difficult-to-find tunic in more than acceptable condition.

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Description

It is an enlisted man’s Küraßier-Regiment Königin (Pommersches) Nr 2 “koller” (the regimental tunic for Prussian Küraßier or Jäger zu Pferde units). Küraßier-Regiment Königin (Pommersches) Nr 2 was among Prussia’s most-elite Küraßier-Regiments. It was founded in 1717, garrisoned at Pasewalk, and attached to the II. Armeekorps. Its Regimental Chef was the Kaiserin, Augusta Viktoria (1858-1921), who was also Königin of Prussia. [The Kaiserin’s eldest son, Kronprinz Wilhelm, was associated with the regiment as an à la Suite officer, as he was with 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1 and 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß]. The regiment displayed special emblems on its gilt-toned küraßes pertaining to battle honors granted it from a key battle in the 1745 War of Austrian Succession, 4 June’s Battle of Hohenfriedberg. [Frederick the Great led his Prussians against a large force of Austrians and Saxons at Hohenfriedberg. It was a total rout]. In addition to displaying the special devices on their küraßes, the regiment boasted bandeaux on their spiked helmets with the battle’s name and date. [The device featured a Hohenzollern Crown surrounded by regimental flags representing the sixty-seven Austrian and Saxon flags/standards captured at Hohenfriedberg.
As indicated above, the “koller” tunic style was worn ONLY by Küraßier and Jäger zu Pferde Regiments. The term referenced their tunics’ uniquely-shaped collars. [Another connection between the two regiment types was their extended-rear-visored metal helmets, which were designed to protect their wearers’ necks]. While the Gardes du Corps (GdC) was considered to be the Imperial German Army’s top-of-the-line unit, the Garde-Küraßier Regiment, along with the Leib-Küraßier-Regiment Großer Kurfürst (Schlesisches) Nr 1, and Küraßier-Regiment Königin Nr 2, were all close behind. The tunic is made of fine white wool and features the special “küraßier collar.” A double row of red trim bands extends down the tunic’s center from its collar to its hem. A fascinating feature of küraßier tunics is that they do NOT employ buttons to close their tunic fronts. Instead, a series of hooks and eyes are concealed beneath the central trim bands, joining the tunic’s two halves underneath a smooth exterior.
The koller’s cuffs display red trim bands accented with white litzen, each of which boasts a silver-toned button. The white shoulder straps are trimmed in red, and feature a crowned royal cypher (“L”) on each strap. The tunic’s right sleeve sports an inverted red “V,” indicating that the wearer had qualified for Lance Proficiency 3rd Class. Outlines of two former “V’s” are still present, probably from earning other, lower proficiency awards.
The tunic’s reverse displays red trim bands extending down to the vent flap. The vent flap itself is decorated by six silver-toned buttons. No depot markings are evident inside the tunic, meaning it was privately-purchased (even enlisted members of elite regiments frequently did this). The liner is made of white silk that is in excellent condition. A name is very faintly penciled into its collar, but I cannot decipher it.
Overall, the tunic is in very good condition. Some scattered moth tracks and moth nips show on its front and back. Due to its white color, some soiling is present. It remains a VERY difficult-to-find tunic in more than acceptable condition.

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