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BAVARIA – ENLISTED MAN – WAFFENROCK – CHEVAULEGERS-REGIMENT Nr 1

SKU: 15-647

$1,495.00

This is a first-time offering of a Bavarian enlisted man’s 1. Chevaulegers-Regiment Kaiser Nikolaus II von Rußland tunic (waffenrock). Bavaria was the only German Kingdom to field Chevaulegers-Regiments, with a total of eight (in contrast with its two Ulanen-Regiments and two Schweren-Reiter-Regiments). 1. Chevaulegers-Regiment Kaiser Nikolaus II von Rußland was raised in 1682. It was garrisoned at Nürnberg, and attached to the Bavarian III. Armeekorps. It was the senior of the eight Chevaulegers-Regiments. At first glance, Chevaulegers-Regiments’ tunics are quite similar to the Ulanen Regiments’ ulankas. The primary difference is that the Bavarian tunics are dark-green, while the other German states’ prewar ulankas are dark-blue.

Our tunic’s collar and trim are crimson. Like an ulanka, the tunic sports a V-shaped double row of buttons that begins on the chest, then narrows to the “V’s” point toward the tunic’s bottom. A total of fourteen gilt-toned buttons (seven per side) makes up the “V.” The sleeves cuffs also are crimson, with two additional gilt buttons per sleeve. The tunic’s shoulder straps, which are a matching crimson, correctly do NOT display a regimental designation. [None of the Chevaulegers-Regiments possessed regimental numbers]. Identification is determined by the strap/epaulette’s color, as well as the epaulette’s metal moon’s color (gold or silver). The straps are sewn-in. Their small shoulder strap buttons display a “3” squadron number. (The cavalry regiments DID employ squadron/kompagnie numbers). The reverse reveals that five of its six, required, gilt buttons are in place. The tunic’s exterior is in very pleasing condition, overall. No major moth problems are present, only a very limited amount of moth tracking.

The interior sports no depot marks, showing that it was a privately-purchased tunic. Interestingly, its off-white lining appears to be made of linen, rather than the more frequently-seen silk found on other privately-purchased pieces. Two areas on the lining bear stamps that are either for the manufacturer, or perhaps a museum that may have housed it, postwar. We are so pleased to present this first-time tunic for your consideration.

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Description

This is a first-time offering of a Bavarian enlisted man’s 1. Chevaulegers-Regiment Kaiser Nikolaus II von Rußland tunic (waffenrock). Bavaria was the only German Kingdom to field Chevaulegers-Regiments, with a total of eight (in contrast with its two Ulanen-Regiments and two Schweren-Reiter-Regiments). 1. Chevaulegers-Regiment Kaiser Nikolaus II von Rußland was raised in 1682. It was garrisoned at Nürnberg, and attached to the Bavarian III. Armeekorps. It was the senior of the eight Chevaulegers-Regiments. At first glance, Chevaulegers-Regiments’ tunics are quite similar to the Ulanen Regiments’ ulankas. The primary difference is that the Bavarian tunics are dark-green, while the other German states’ prewar ulankas are dark-blue.

Our tunic’s collar and trim are crimson. Like an ulanka, the tunic sports a V-shaped double row of buttons that begins on the chest, then narrows to the “V’s” point toward the tunic’s bottom. A total of fourteen gilt-toned buttons (seven per side) makes up the “V.” The sleeves cuffs also are crimson, with two additional gilt buttons per sleeve. The tunic’s shoulder straps, which are a matching crimson, correctly do NOT display a regimental designation. [None of the Chevaulegers-Regiments possessed regimental numbers]. Identification is determined by the strap/epaulette’s color, as well as the epaulette’s metal moon’s color (gold or silver). The straps are sewn-in. Their small shoulder strap buttons display a “3” squadron number. (The cavalry regiments DID employ squadron/kompagnie numbers). The reverse reveals that five of its six, required, gilt buttons are in place. The tunic’s exterior is in very pleasing condition, overall. No major moth problems are present, only a very limited amount of moth tracking.

The interior sports no depot marks, showing that it was a privately-purchased tunic. Interestingly, its off-white lining appears to be made of linen, rather than the more frequently-seen silk found on other privately-purchased pieces. Two areas on the lining bear stamps that are either for the manufacturer, or perhaps a museum that may have housed it, postwar. We are so pleased to present this first-time tunic for your consideration.