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SAXONY – TUNIC – ENLISTED MAN – FELDARTILLERIE Nr 32 SOLDIER’S 1915 FELDGRAU (FRIEDENSUNIFORM)

SKU: 15-612

$3,295.00

We receive many requests for feldgrau tunics. More often than not we can find officers’ tunics in the condition we require, while many enlisted men’s tunics do not come up to our standards. Today, however, we have an enlisted man’s feldgrau tunic from the Kingdom of Saxony’s Königl. Sächs 3. Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr 32. The Regiment was raised in 1889 and garrisoned at Riesa. [It was a relatively short-lived regiment that existed only from 1889 into 1918, so material related to it is not easy-to-come-by]. It was assigned to the XIX. Armeekorps, which consisted of all-Saxon units. [The XII. Armeekorps was also a Saxon corps].

The high-quality wool uniform is well made. It is an M-1915 Friedensuniform, the final feldgrau tunic pattern produced by WW I Germany. The Friedensuniform’s literal translation is “Future Peace Uniform.” Thus, it was intended to be the uniform pattern used by the German Army once a peace was established. In addition to the feldgrau material, it has a black-velvet collar. A thin red trim line extends to the tunic’s bottom, flanking eight gilt-toned buttons. Each tunic cuff is made of the same black velvet, with two gilt buttons on it. The shoulder straps are green. Embroidered in red on each strap we see a crown, “AR” (König Albert of Saxony’s (1828-1902) cypher), and crossed cannons. The straps are sewn to the tunic on one end and fastened by one gilt-toned button on the other. The tunic’s front sports only two moth nips as far as I can see (one on the tunic’s left skirt and one on its right arm).
The tunic’s reverse sports a total of four gilt buttons on the tunic’s flap. As I examine the reverse, I can see a total of three more small moth nips. None of the nips on the obverse or reverse are detractive to its overall presentation. The interior displays a gray silk lining. This was clearly a privately-purchased tunic, not depot-issued, which explains the tunic material’s superior quality. One large pocket appears on the lining’s left side.
It is a tunic that displays amazingly superior quality. If you are looking for a legitimate wartime tunic, this would make a wonderful addition to your collection.

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Description

We receive many requests for feldgrau tunics. More often than not we can find officers’ tunics in the condition we require, while many enlisted men’s tunics do not come up to our standards. Today, however, we have an enlisted man’s feldgrau tunic from the Kingdom of Saxony’s Königl. Sächs 3. Feldartillerie-Regiment Nr 32. The Regiment was raised in 1889 and garrisoned at Riesa. [It was a relatively short-lived regiment that existed only from 1889 into 1918, so material related to it is not easy-to-come-by]. It was assigned to the XIX. Armeekorps, which consisted of all-Saxon units. [The XII. Armeekorps was also a Saxon corps].

The high-quality wool uniform is well made. It is an M-1915 Friedensuniform, the final feldgrau tunic pattern produced by WW I Germany. The Friedensuniform’s literal translation is “Future Peace Uniform.” Thus, it was intended to be the uniform pattern used by the German Army once a peace was established. In addition to the feldgrau material, it has a black-velvet collar. A thin red trim line extends to the tunic’s bottom, flanking eight gilt-toned buttons. Each tunic cuff is made of the same black velvet, with two gilt buttons on it. The shoulder straps are green. Embroidered in red on each strap we see a crown, “AR” (König Albert of Saxony’s (1828-1902) cypher), and crossed cannons. The straps are sewn to the tunic on one end and fastened by one gilt-toned button on the other. The tunic’s front sports only two moth nips as far as I can see (one on the tunic’s left skirt and one on its right arm).
The tunic’s reverse sports a total of four gilt buttons on the tunic’s flap. As I examine the reverse, I can see a total of three more small moth nips. None of the nips on the obverse or reverse are detractive to its overall presentation. The interior displays a gray silk lining. This was clearly a privately-purchased tunic, not depot-issued, which explains the tunic material’s superior quality. One large pocket appears on the lining’s left side.
It is a tunic that displays amazingly superior quality. If you are looking for a legitimate wartime tunic, this would make a wonderful addition to your collection.

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