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BAVARIA – PICKELHAUBE – GENERAL – ADJUTANT OR WAR MINISTRY

SKU: 04-772 XJT

$7,995.00

BAVARIA – PICKELHAUBE – GENERAL – ADJUTANT OR WAR MINISTRY .

In keeping with our offering of Generals’ pickelhauben, we present the pickelhaube of a Bavarian General who served either as an Adjutant or at the Bavarian War Ministry. While its basic shape and leather are good, patches of leather are missing between the cruciform’s four arms. Some settling of the crown has occurred at the point where the cruciform is attached, which is a frequent occurrence on helmets that sport large cruciforms. For some reason, we see this occur more on Bavarian helmets than we do on helmets from other states that display similar cruciforms. Its front visor is squared.

The helmet’s furniture features a superb, frosted-gold wappen that displays the traditional, twin, rampant, Bavarian Lions. A stunning, unblemished, oval, red, gold, black, and blue enamel shield appears between them. This shield was first introduced to Bavarian General Officers’ helmets in May 1914, just a few months before WW I began in August. All of the helmet’s other metal details, including the chin scales, trim, cruciform, and officers’ stars, are gold-toned. Its very tall, elegant spike is fluted. The exterior’s final detail is a fine pair of State and Reich Officer’s kokarden.

The spiked helmet’s interior shows a topnotch leather sweatband. The sweatband is a very dark brown, which is a bit unusual. The back visor displays a gilt button that indicates the helmet is a size “57,” which is on the top limit of average (55-57). [Anything below those dimensions was a Small. Anything above it was a large. That said, the largest pickelhaube that I have encountered was a size “60,” which belonged to a General.

Clearly, Generals had more brains than anybody else and consequently their larger heads needed larger helmets]! A brown, ribbed, silk liner that shows very moderate wear and is in good condition is attached to the liner. ALL of the original hardware for the officers stars and the wappen is in place.

The helmet DOES feature one oddity that we must share with you. If you look directly below the most forward officers’ star’s hardware, you will see an old, period patch. When one presses on the patch, one can feel a depression that contains a hole. Frankly, I found this very puzzling since the hole is in an odd place. It is nowhere near where the wappen holes appear. All I can theorize is that when the manufacturer was building the helmet he made a mistake in where he drilled the hole for the officer’s star. No other logical explanation exists. [Please remember this is a VERY old patch, and NOT a recent event].

I feel very confident about this spiked helmet. Its consignor has allowed me to offer it at a very reasonable price for such a piece. It is a real looker that will display most attractively. This is a consignment item.

In stock


Description

BAVARIA – PICKELHAUBE – GENERAL – ADJUTANT OR WAR MINISTRY .

In keeping with our offering of Generals’ pickelhauben, we present the pickelhaube of a Bavarian General who served either as an Adjutant or at the Bavarian War Ministry. While its basic shape and leather are good, patches of leather are missing between the cruciform’s four arms. Some settling of the crown has occurred at the point where the cruciform is attached, which is a frequent occurrence on helmets that sport large cruciforms. For some reason, we see this occur more on Bavarian helmets than we do on helmets from other states that display similar cruciforms. Its front visor is squared.

The helmet’s furniture features a superb, frosted-gold wappen that displays the traditional, twin, rampant, Bavarian Lions. A stunning, unblemished, oval, red, gold, black, and blue enamel shield appears between them. This shield was first introduced to Bavarian General Officers’ helmets in May 1914, just a few months before WW I began in August. All of the helmet’s other metal details, including the chin scales, trim, cruciform, and officers’ stars, are gold-toned. Its very tall, elegant spike is fluted. The exterior’s final detail is a fine pair of State and Reich Officer’s kokarden.

The spiked helmet’s interior shows a topnotch leather sweatband. The sweatband is a very dark brown, which is a bit unusual. The back visor displays a gilt button that indicates the helmet is a size “57,” which is on the top limit of average (55-57). [Anything below those dimensions was a Small. Anything above it was a large. That said, the largest pickelhaube that I have encountered was a size “60,” which belonged to a General.

Clearly, Generals had more brains than anybody else and consequently their larger heads needed larger helmets]! A brown, ribbed, silk liner that shows very moderate wear and is in good condition is attached to the liner. ALL of the original hardware for the officers stars and the wappen is in place.

The helmet DOES feature one oddity that we must share with you. If you look directly below the most forward officers’ star’s hardware, you will see an old, period patch. When one presses on the patch, one can feel a depression that contains a hole. Frankly, I found this very puzzling since the hole is in an odd place. It is nowhere near where the wappen holes appear. All I can theorize is that when the manufacturer was building the helmet he made a mistake in where he drilled the hole for the officer’s star. No other logical explanation exists. [Please remember this is a VERY old patch, and NOT a recent event].

I feel very confident about this spiked helmet. Its consignor has allowed me to offer it at a very reasonable price for such a piece. It is a real looker that will display most attractively. This is a consignment item.