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AUTOGRAPHED POSTCARD – WW I PLM-WINNER – WW II LUFTWAFFE GENERAL – BRUNO LOERZER

SKU: 19-219 XBO

$350.00 $250.00

This is a consignment item. Bruno Loerzer (1891-1960) was a WW I air ace. He achieved a total of forty-four confirmed victories, which tied him for sixth on the German air aces list. (Many of those ahead of him, including Manfred von Richthofen and Werner Voß, did not survive the war). He was awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite in February 1918. He was also given the command of Jagdgeschwader (JG) Nr III. Each JG had four squadrons assigned to it. Manfred von Richthofen commanded the first (JG I). After von Richthofen’s death and that of his picked heir, Hermann Göring was JG 1’s final commander. Interestingly, Göring served as Loerzer’s observer until 1915 when both switched to single-seaters. The connection with Göring served Loerzer well after WW I. With the Nazi Party’s (NSDAP) rise to power in the mid-1930’s, a new air force, the Luftwaffe was born. Loerzer rose through the ranks due to his friendship with Göring. Before WW II began, Loerzer found himself a generalmajor. He served on the Eastern Front and in Italy, rising to the rank of Generaloberst, the second-highest rank in the Luftwaffe after generalfeldmarschall. He received the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross in 1940. He was one of the few officers to win Germany’s highest decoration in both WW I and WW II. Loerzer retired due to ill health before the end of WW II.
Our offering is a WW II postcard of Loerzer as a General der Flieger, which was equal to a Lieutenant General (three stars) in the U.S. Army or U.S. Army Air Force. It measures 4 1/8″ x 5 13/16.” It shows him in uniform wearing both the PLM and the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross at his throat. On his chest we see the 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class with the 1939 Spange, as well as his Luftwaffe Pilot Badge. His name is inscribed with a greeting in black ink. On the reverse we see that it was mailed on 29 August 1943 as a Feldpostkarte. Its cancellation, complete with the swastika, is in the upper left corner, which also has a bend in it. Other than that, it is a fine example. I have seldom offered a Bruno Loerzer autograph. While this is a consignment item, it is a fine example.

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Description

This is a consignment item. Bruno Loerzer (1891-1960) was a WW I air ace. He achieved a total of forty-four confirmed victories, which tied him for sixth on the German air aces list. (Many of those ahead of him, including Manfred von Richthofen and Werner Voß, did not survive the war). He was awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite in February 1918. He was also given the command of Jagdgeschwader (JG) Nr III. Each JG had four squadrons assigned to it. Manfred von Richthofen commanded the first (JG I). After von Richthofen’s death and that of his picked heir, Hermann Göring was JG 1’s final commander. Interestingly, Göring served as Loerzer’s observer until 1915 when both switched to single-seaters. The connection with Göring served Loerzer well after WW I. With the Nazi Party’s (NSDAP) rise to power in the mid-1930’s, a new air force, the Luftwaffe was born. Loerzer rose through the ranks due to his friendship with Göring. Before WW II began, Loerzer found himself a generalmajor. He served on the Eastern Front and in Italy, rising to the rank of Generaloberst, the second-highest rank in the Luftwaffe after generalfeldmarschall. He received the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross in 1940. He was one of the few officers to win Germany’s highest decoration in both WW I and WW II. Loerzer retired due to ill health before the end of WW II.
Our offering is a WW II postcard of Loerzer as a General der Flieger, which was equal to a Lieutenant General (three stars) in the U.S. Army or U.S. Army Air Force. It measures 4 1/8″ x 5 13/16.” It shows him in uniform wearing both the PLM and the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross at his throat. On his chest we see the 1914 Iron Cross 1st Class with the 1939 Spange, as well as his Luftwaffe Pilot Badge. His name is inscribed with a greeting in black ink. On the reverse we see that it was mailed on 29 August 1943 as a Feldpostkarte. Its cancellation, complete with the swastika, is in the upper left corner, which also has a bend in it. Other than that, it is a fine example. I have seldom offered a Bruno Loerzer autograph. While this is a consignment item, it is a fine example.