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100mm ARTILLERY SHELL CASING TRENCH ART PITCHER

SKU: 10-836

$225.00

This is a German 100mm artillery piece shell casing that has been converted to a trench art vase. This cannon German was officially known as “10 cm Canaan 14 (10 cm K 14).” It is heavily modified and has been concerted for use as a pitcher. Trench art was created by soldiers from all WW I’s armies, when they had extra time on their hands in the trenches between battles. They took bits and pieces of gear and fashioned them into artistic objects. Some common examples were belt buckles converted into match safes, as well as jewelry and letter openers fashioned from shrapnel shards. These often-bored soldiers showed amazing creativity. A great deal of trench art also was created in hospitals as therapy for soldiers recovering from mild to severe wounds.
Considered a medium caliber field piece, the 100 mm cannon was another primary German mobile artillery weapon throughout WW I. While slightly larger than the 77mm field piece, it was transported by a six-horse team, but a caisson was NOT used due to its larger size than “77.” The pitcher stands 7 ½” tall. It measures 4″ (100mm) in diameter at the base. The typical munitions work’s markings are present. The shell was originally manufactured in 1915. The shell’s exterior is completely covered with stippling. This was a very labor intensive process that took its creator many hours to complete. A sturdy handle made from another stippled, brass piece is attached its side. I estimate that the pitcher holds between 24 and 32 liquid ounces. I have not seen another trench art pitcher like it. It is quite unusual and very well made. It exhibits beautifully on any flat surface, or it could highlight a display. You are only limited by your imagination.

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Description

This is a German 100mm artillery piece shell casing that has been converted to a trench art vase. This cannon German was officially known as “10 cm Canaan 14 (10 cm K 14).” It is heavily modified and has been concerted for use as a pitcher. Trench art was created by soldiers from all WW I’s armies, when they had extra time on their hands in the trenches between battles. They took bits and pieces of gear and fashioned them into artistic objects. Some common examples were belt buckles converted into match safes, as well as jewelry and letter openers fashioned from shrapnel shards. These often-bored soldiers showed amazing creativity. A great deal of trench art also was created in hospitals as therapy for soldiers recovering from mild to severe wounds.
Considered a medium caliber field piece, the 100 mm cannon was another primary German mobile artillery weapon throughout WW I. While slightly larger than the 77mm field piece, it was transported by a six-horse team, but a caisson was NOT used due to its larger size than “77.” The pitcher stands 7 ½” tall. It measures 4″ (100mm) in diameter at the base. The typical munitions work’s markings are present. The shell was originally manufactured in 1915. The shell’s exterior is completely covered with stippling. This was a very labor intensive process that took its creator many hours to complete. A sturdy handle made from another stippled, brass piece is attached its side. I estimate that the pitcher holds between 24 and 32 liquid ounces. I have not seen another trench art pitcher like it. It is quite unusual and very well made. It exhibits beautifully on any flat surface, or it could highlight a display. You are only limited by your imagination.

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