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PRUSSIA – RED EAGLE ORDER- 4th CLASS

PRUSSIA – RED EAGLE ORDER- 4th CLASS

This is the Order of the Red Eagle 4th Class. It is the final version which was used until 1918 and has pebbled arms. The enamel is not damaged and is fine condition. It comes with an ORIGINAL ribbon….

 

PRUSSIA – RED EAGLE ORDER – 4TH CLASS – FINAL PATTERN

PRUSSIA – RED EAGLE ORDER – 4TH CLASS – FINAL PATTERN

The Red Eagle Order 4th Class in its final pattern awarded from 1888 until the end of the Empire in 1918. The Red Eagle has pebbled arms and a multi colored enamel center. The reverse has the crowned royal cypher of Friedrich Wilhelm.

There is no manufacturer hallmarking and there is a short piece of replacement ribbon.

PRUSSIA – RED EAGLE ORDER – 4TH CLASS – FINAL PATTERN – WITH SIXTY YEAR BUTTON

PRUSSIA – RED EAGLE ORDER – 4TH CLASS – FINAL PATTERN – WITH SIXTY YEAR BUTTON

This Red Eagle Order 4th Class. comes with a sixty year button which indicates how long the holder of this decoration has been a member of the order. This red eagle is the “final pattern” which was awarded from 1888 until the end of the Empire in 1918. It has pebbled arms and a multi colored enamel center. The reverse has the crowned royal cypher of Friedrich Wilhelm……

PRUSSIA – MEDAL BAR – TWO PLACE – ORDER OF RED EAGLE 4th CLASS AND CROWN ORDER 4th CLASS WITH FIFTY-YEARS LONG-SERVICE BUTTON

PRUSSIA – MEDAL BAR – TWO PLACE – ORDER OF RED EAGLE 4th CLASS AND CROWN ORDER 4th CLASS WITH FIFTY-YEARS LONG-SERVICE BUTTON

This is a most unusual medal bar combination of the two medals listed below.

*Order of the Red Eagle 4th Class – Prussia. The Red Eagle’s hand-painted center is in flawless condition. The decoration is not hallmarked for a maker.

*Crown Order 4th Class with the Fifty Years Long-Service Button-Prussia. The decoration is in first-class condition. Its blue/gold enameled center is flawless. The fifty-year button is mounted on the decoration’s jump ring. The six o’clock arm’s edge reveals a “W” hallmark for one of the House of Hohenzollern’s premiere house jewelers.

It is a superb medal bar. Both the medals and their ribbons are crisp and clean. The bar was probably awarded to a civilian, who was most-likely in his seventies when he wore it.

RED EAGLE ORDER 4th CLASS WITH CROWN

RED EAGLE ORDER 4th CLASS WITH CROWN

This is a very fine example of the Red Eagle Order 4th Class with Crown. The Red Eagle Order was one of three Prussian decoration families. These families include the Red Eagle Order (Roter Adler Orden/RAO), the Crown Order, and the Hohenzollern Order. The decorations within each Order consisted of a Collar, Breast Stars, a Großkreuz, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Classes, as well as the Medal of the Order. The RAO was instituted in 1792. It was the oldest of the three Prussian Order families. Many models were issued during the RAO’s lifetime. Our offering today is a Red Eagle Order 4th Class, which was the order’s final model, instituted in 1892. By itself, the medal measures 1 1/2” x 1 1/2.” The articulated crown measures 3/4” x 3/4.” The medal has pebbled arms. The silver crown boasts a red enameled interior. The decoration’s center features a hand painted Red Eagle. The decoration’s reverse displays König Friedrich Wilhelm III’s crowned royal cypher “FW.” The decoration is not hallmarked. A beautiful, watermarked silk ribbon, measuring 2,” accompanies it. The decoration is in excellent condition.

PRUSSIA – AWARD DOCUMENT FOR THE RED EAGLE 4th CLASS

PRUSSIA – AWARD DOCUMENT FOR THE RED EAGLE 4th CLASS

This is an award document for the Order of the Red Eagle 4th Class (Rothen Adler Orden Vierter Klasse). This award was made to a Heinrich Johannes Halke. The award came in 1886, during the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm I. The document is signed by an official of the Royal Prussian Orders Commission, more commonly known as the Ordenskanzler. The document measures 13″ x 8 1/4,” and is quite ornate. It has been folded in quarters. A two inch tear shows at the top of the document where one of the folds was made.

PRUSSIA – AWARD DOCUMENT – ORDER – RED EAGLE 4th CLASS

PRUSSIA – AWARD DOCUMENT – ORDER – RED EAGLE 4th CLASS

This is the Award Document (Urkunde) for the Red Eagle Order 4th Class. The document measures 13″ x 8 1/4,” folded and 13″ x 16 1/2″ unfolded. It is a preprinted award document, as this class of the Red Eagle Order was most commonly issued. The man to whom it was awarded was Carl Friedrich Rohte. He was not a military man, as it is not mentioned. The document and award were issued on 17 June 1910. The document shows the Prussian Coat-of-Arms, as the Red Eagle and the Orden Pour le Mérite were Prussia’s two oldest decorations. It also has a signature of an official from the Prussian Orders Commission.

RED EAGLE ORDER 2nd CLASS AWARD DOCUMENT SIGNED – KING WILHELM I (LATER KAISER WILHELM I) OF PRUSSIA

RED EAGLE ORDER 2nd CLASS AWARD DOCUMENT SIGNED – KING WILHELM I (LATER KAISER WILHELM I) OF PRUSSIA

This is a very interesting award document (urkunde) for the Red Eagle Order 2nd Class. It is the earliest award document we have ever offered [with the exception of award documents for the 1813 Iron Cross 2nd Class signed by King Friedrich Wilhelm III, the grandfather of King (later Kaiser) Wilhelm I]. This document was signed by King Wilhelm I on 18 January 1863. The recipient was Dr. Albert Sigismund Jaspis, the Generalsuperintendant of Pommern in Stettin (1809-1885). The award was actually for the Red Eagle Order 2nd Class with Bow. The use of the bow was a unique addition to the Red Eagle Order, which marked the recipient for the award of a higher class at a later date. The format of the document is identical to that which was used until the end of the Empire in 1918.

PRUSSIA – RED EAGLE ORDER 4th CLASS AND AWARD DOCUMENTS

PRUSSIA – RED EAGLE ORDER 4th CLASS AND AWARD DOCUMENTS

This is a very fine example of the Order of the Red Eagle 4th Class and its award document (Urkunde) from Prussia. The Red Eagle Order is a complete family of decorations, containing breast stars, neck orders, and ribboned medals. Our example includes an ornate document dated 22 August 1907 and made out to a Carl Friedrich Rohte. It is signed by the Ordens Kanzler. This is a civil, and not a military, award. Three additional documents relating to the decoration’s award and other decorations that he received are included, such as the transmittal letters, etc. The decoration itself comes on a very short ribbon. The decoration’s only flaw is a chip to its hand-painted center.

IRON CROSS – 1870 – 2nd CLASS AND 25-YEAR OAK LEAVES WITH RED-EAGLE-STYLE PRESENTATION CASE

IRON CROSS – 1870 – 2nd CLASS AND 25-YEAR OAK LEAVES WITH RED-EAGLE-STYLE PRESENTATION CASE

This is a consignment item. It is a very handsome presentation of a high-quality 1870 Iron Cross in top condition. Its paint is nearly-perfect. It comes from a manufacturer who cared about his work and wanted to present a top-shelf product. He was completely successful in this effort! As handsome as the Iron Cross is, the 25-Year Jubilee Oak Leaves are the real stars. Their silver sports a high, frosted finish that just glows where it is attached to the ribbon. Speaking of the ribbon, it is extra-long, measuring approximately 9″ in length (it is folded in half and sewn together).
The Iron Cross is housed in an INcorrect red leatherette case. The case measures 3/4″ x 2 1/8″ x 2 5/8.” It is similar to, or IS, a Red Eagle Order 3rd or 4th Class’s case. The case has black silk and velvet lining its inner top and bottom halves. It also sports a most-handsome gold trim around its lower half.

PRUSSIA – PICKELHAUBE  – NCO – HOHENZOLLERN PARADE EAGLE – LEIB-GENDARMERIE

PRUSSIA – PICKELHAUBE  – NCO – HOHENZOLLERN PARADE EAGLE – LEIB-GENDARMERIE

While it is often thought that the Regiment des Garde du Corps was the Kaiser’s unit of protection, it was in fact the Leib-Gendarmerie that was the King of Prussia’s personal guard and later to Germany’s three Kaisers.

The Leib-Gendarmerie was formed in 1820 during the reign of König Friedrich Wilhelm III who guided Prussia through the Napoleonic wars. The unit consisted of one hundred men (All experienced senior NCO’s) and had only one officer. They were organized into two zugs and were stationed in both Berlin and Potsdam. The 1st zug protected the King/Kaiser and the 2nd zug protected the Queen/Kaiserin….

 

PRUSSIA – PICKELHAUBE  – OFFICER – HOHENZOLLERN PARADE EAGLE – LEIB-GENDARMERIE 

PRUSSIA – PICKELHAUBE  – OFFICER – HOHENZOLLERN PARADE EAGLE – LEIB-GENDARMERIE 

While it is often thought that the Regiment des Garde du Corps was the Kaiser’s unit of protection, it was in fact the Leib-Gendarmerie that was the King of Prussia’s personal guard and later to Germany’s three Kaisers.

The Leib-Gendarmerie was formed in 1820 during the reign of König Friedrich Wilhelm III who guided Prussia through the Napoleonic wars. The unit consisted of one hundred men (All experienced senior NCO’s) and had only one officer. They were organized into two zugs and were stationed in both Berlin and Potsdam. The 1st zug protected the King/Kaiser and the 2nd zug protected the Queen/Kaiserin….

 

PRUSSIA – MITRE – 1900 CENTENNIAL FUND-RAISING  WITH GREEN, RED, AND WHITE PUSCHEL

PRUSSIA – MITRE – 1900 CENTENNIAL FUND-RAISING WITH GREEN, RED, AND WHITE PUSCHEL

Around the turn of the 20th Century, charitable fund-raising in Imperial Germany touched on its citizens’ patriotic fervor by employing a military theme. A popular offering was inexpensive copies of Mitres that had been worn by famous regiments. This is a copy of a Mitre worn in the mid-1700s. Based on its Puschel, I believe it was for by IR 18. It sports a black metal front plate with a Prussian Black Eagle holding a sword and a scepter, and the cypher “FR.” Its body is red with white piping and flames around the base. The rear flame displays a circular disk below it. Its interior features a strip of black leather and a fine cloth liner with a drawstring to adjust its size. The letters “XXVIk134″ are stamped on the cloth liner. The plush white Puschel is beautiful. It sports a red band and a green center. It is very unusual to find a Puschel with these Centennial pieces. It is a beautiful and rare copy of an early Mitre……..

 

 

REGIMENT der GARDES du CORPS PARADE EAGLE FOR ENLISTED MAN’S PICKELHAUBE

REGIMENT der GARDES du CORPS PARADE EAGLE FOR ENLISTED MAN’S PICKELHAUBE

This is a consignment item. The Regiment der Gardes du Corps clearly was the most elite unit within the Imperial German Army. They were considered the personal Garde of Prussia’s König (later the German Empire’s Kaiser). The regiment’s officers and enlisted men sported distinctive spiked helmets. For daily wear (Dienst), the pickelhaube was worn with a fluted spike. For dress occasions, the spike was replaced with an elaborate, silver-toned Hohenzollern Eagle, which is what we are offering here.
The Eagle’s wings are outspread and a gold-toned Hohenzollern Crown is perched on its head. The detailing to the Eagle’s wings and body is quite striking. One can clearly see individual feathers on its body. An old, professional repair is visible on one of its toes. Another professional repair was made to the Eagle’s underside. Some very old blue tape is visible in this area. The owner never removed it since it cannot be seen when the Eagle is mounted on the pickelhaube. Speaking of mounting, a large wingnut spins down on a screw that extends into the helmet. The nut is what secures the Eagle to the helmet’s top.
This is a very hard-to-find accouterment that would complete a Gardes du Corps enlisted man’s helmet. The Eagle’s condition is quite pleasing, overall. It will make a fine addition to any collection.

GERMANY – CROCHETED/EMBROIDERED HOT PAD – COMMEMORATING 500 YEARS OF GERMANY (1415-1915)

GERMANY – CROCHETED/EMBROIDERED HOT PAD – COMMEMORATING 500 YEARS OF GERMANY (1415-1915)

This is an interesting crocheted piece celebrating the 500th anniversary of some event in Germany (1415-1915). I am not sure exactly what event it commemorates. It is designed to protect one’s hand when removing a hot dish from the oven, then serve as a hot pad to protect the table surface from the hot dish while it is being served. The piece measures 15 3/4″ x 9″ when opened up completely. A Hohenzollern Eagle is beautifully embroidered in the center of the outside flap, with the dates 1415 in the upper left corner and 1915 in the lower right. Lace decorates three sides of the flap. Underneath is the pocket into which one’s hand is placed to grasp the hot dish. It is both a practical and beautiful item, in excellent shape for its age. The embroidery is exquisite.

GERMANY – FLAG – 2008 MOVIE THE RED BARON

GERMANY – FLAG – 2008 MOVIE THE RED BARON

The movie The Red Baron (Der Rote Baron when originally released) is the story of Manfred von Richthofen. Today we are offering a flag used in that film. The Red Baron was filmed in Germany and released in 2008. Those of you who know me are aware that the hit movie The Blue Max (1966), was based on Jack D. Hunter’s best-selling novel. It is what inspired my lifelong love of Imperial Germany. As influential as the movie and novel have been in my life, I believe the German-made Der Rote Baron is a superior film. I am well aware of its faults, including a fabricated involvement with Roy Brown that utterly surpasses recorded historical truth, as well as a blatantly 21st Century interpretation of Käte Otersdorf’s character and romantic involvement with von Richthofen. Although much rumor and speculation exist about a possible relationship between the two, all we know from the historical record is that Otersdorf was the Baron’s nurse in July 1917, following the first time he was shot down. No credible evidence has surfaced to indicate otherwise. However, it made a compelling “Hollywood” storyline! As I once pointed out to Jack Hunter when he complained about The Blue Max film’s historical inaccuracies, mainstream motion pictures are NOT produced to satisfy historians, Imperial German Period enthusiasts, or antique collectors. They are created to ENTERTAIN as many average moviegoers as possible, thereby generating massive worldwide profits from ticket, concession, and DVD sales. Having a good-looking young woman jump into bed with the movie’s hero can help sell plenty of tickets and popcorn. If you do not demand the historical accuracy of a scholarly documentary, The Red Baron is a great ride. During its two hours, I take off my “professional glasses” and simply enjoy the flying scenes, costumes, soundtrack and so on. Viewing it in such a manner, I find it easy to call it one of the best WW I aviation movies I have seen. I think its creators did a heck of a job with their green screens and computer graphics. Yes, they played fast and loose with the real Käte Otersdorf, Roy Brown, and Werner Voß. So be it, it remains a very enjoyable film.
Now, let us consider a few background facts related to the flag we are offering. Most of you know that Manfred von Richthofen’s first command was Jasta 11. In June 1917, he was given command of Jagdgeschwader Nr 1 (JG 1), which consisted of Jastas 4, 6, 10, and 11. [These four squadrons became known as the “Flying Circus” because each Jasta was known for its collage of plane colors. Anyone familiar with the color combinations could identify the planes]. Jasta 10 (created in 1916) joined JG 1 in June 1917. During WW I, Jasta 10’s pilots destroyed 118 airplanes and 33 observation balloons, while losing 20 pilots in air combat. Some of Jasta 10’s best-known commanders were PLM-winners Albert Dossenbach, Ernst Freiherr von Althaus, and the legendary Werner Voß. In the movie, Manfred von Richthofen lands in the hospital after being shot down by Roy Brown on 6 July 1917 [one of the wildly inaccurate plot points. Roy Brown and Manfred von Richthofen only met once – on 21 April 1918]. Following the scene in which von Richthofen finally checks himself out of the hospital, the elevated-above-the-airfield camera pans across the airplanes. If you watch in slow motion (to get all the details), you will glimpse an interesting flag flapping in the breeze. At first, the flag seems to be a conventional kriegsflagge, i.e., an Iron Cross appears in its upper left corner. An encircled Hohenzollern Eagle appears in the flag’s center with Jasta 11 stenciled over it in red. The latter flag is one of four that were commissioned for the film, one for each of JG 1’s four Jastas. I do not know exactly how these were distributed after filming ended, but I can say THIS flag came from a cast member. Only four were made, so this is the only Jasta 10.
The flag is one-sided with a blank reverse. It measures 56” x 93.” From a distance, the flag looks like it is very old. It has been artificially aged, however, to sport the distressed appearance of several years’ worth of flying in the sun and elements. I was quite excited when the flag was offered to me, and bought it right away. It just arrived from Germany, and I wanted to share it with you immediately.

DELUXE DESK PIECE COMMEMORATING BATTLING EAGLES (AS SEEN ON EHRENBECHER AVIATION AWARDS)

DELUXE DESK PIECE COMMEMORATING BATTLING EAGLES (AS SEEN ON EHRENBECHER AVIATION AWARDS)

This is one of the most amazing desk pieces that I have ever cast my eyes upon. The magnificent presentation’s central theme is a pair of battling eagles. One eagle is in the superior position with its wings outspread, flapping over the vanquished eagle below it. [They are in flight, by the way]. The design comes directly from Ehrenbechers (honor goblets) first awarded to Oswald Boelcke and Max Immelmann on 24 December 1915. These Ehrenbechers initially were produced by Berlin’s Godet & Söhne, Kaiser Wilhelm II’s noted house jewelers. The firm also produced many of the PLM’s, Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Orders, and other top German awards. In addition, both men became WW I’s first recipients of the Orden Pour le Mérite (nicknamed the “Blue Max” for Max Immelmann) in January 1916, after achieving their eighth victories. Both were dead before 1916 ended. Max Immelmann was killed in June, while Oswald Boelcke was the victim of a midair collision with one of his own pilots in October.
The Ehrenbecher was funded by the German armament industry (which, dear readers, can be spelled “Alfred Krupp”). The actual design, purchase, and distribution of the Ehrenbecher came from the office of the Kommandierender General der Luftstreitkräfte (Commanding General of the Imperial German Air Service) Generalleutnant Ernst von Hoeppner and Oberstleutnant Hermann von der Lieth-Thomsen, von Hoeppner’s Chief-of-Staff. Officially known as “Ehrenbecher für den Sieger” (Honor Goblet for the Winner), featured the two battling eagles in flight and the legend “Dem Sieger im Luftkampf” (To the Victor in Aerial Combat). The Ehrenbecher stood on four balled feet. Its height was approximately 190 mm; its inside diameter was 95.5 mm; its outside diameter was 96-98 mm; the base’s diameter (with writing) was 70 mm; its height was 14 mm; the ball feet had a diameter of 21 mm. The weight was about 318 grams.
Initially, the Ehrenbecher was awarded in three different metal compositions. First, it was awarded in .800 silver. Later, as silver supplies ran low, it was awarded in iron. During the three years that it was awarded, it came with an Urkunde (award document). As time went by, the required number of planes to be shot down in order to receive an Ehrenbecher was increased, just as it was for a PLM. Approximately 2,400 were awarded. At that point the goblet’s award was halted and only the document was awarded through the General’s office.
With that quick history of the Ehrenbecher, we now return to the star of our show: the glorious desk piece. At first glance, the piece’s marble portion looks like it was a cigarette/cigar ashtray. I discount that idea, however, as it has no slots on the edges to keep the cigarette or cigar in place. Research proved it to be a “Salver.” A Salver was a Victorian era item. In fact an item that allowed the dropping of calling cards in it’s interior. They might be found in an entry hall but in this case, it would have been placed on the desk of a well heeled officer to serve as a decorative piece and a recipient of calling cards!

The marble base measures 1 ½” x 8 ¼.” It is extremely high-quality. Its condition is as it was so many years ago when the proud owner took first took possession of it. Attached in the center are the two battling eagles in all their 3D glory. They clearly depict the fierceness of the battle, the triumph of the victory, and the despair of the vanquished. Each bird measures 5 ½” x 10,” and the pair together measure 6 ½” x 10.” The eagles are made of a high-quality bronze. Perhaps most exciting of all, each beak is made of ivory! This massive display weighs a whopping 8 pounds, 9 ounces.
I have a theory about the presentation. The Ehrengabe was the naval version of the Ehrenbecher. It was a statuette, with a similar 3D version of the battling eagles mounted on the wooden base. In the photographs of our offering, we are adding a photograph or two of the Ehrengabe so you can see what leads me to this conclusion. Our desk piece may well have belonged to a naval aviator rather than one from the Army. Whichever theory you prefer, this will add a major aviation piece to your collection. It is more unusual than the original, as well as a fraction of the price of an Ehrenbecher or Ehrengabe. krMay16

AUSTRIA – FRAME – HAND CARVED WOOD – HAPSBURG EAGLE

AUSTRIA – FRAME – HAND CARVED WOOD – HAPSBURG EAGLE

Massive, truly magnificent, artistically hand carved wooden Hapsburg Eagle. It has been years since we have offered a sophisticated example of German Imperial Period woodcarving. Without a doubt, this is one of the finest we have ever offered. During the Imperial Period, most of Europe’s finest hand woodcarving came from Germany and Austria. [The tradition is still practiced today primarily in Southern Germany (the Black Forest and Bavaria) and Northern Austria (the Tyrol)]. I cannot say with certainty whether our example originated in Austria or Germany, although it was done to commemorate Austria’s Hapsburg Empire. I date this fine example from 1875 up through 1918, when the Great War’s end resulted in the demise of Germany and Austria’s empires….

 

PRUSSIA – CAP BADGE – K.Y.C. YACHT CLUB – THE ROYAL PRUSSIAN YACHT CLUB

PRUSSIA – CAP BADGE – K.Y.C. YACHT CLUB – THE ROYAL PRUSSIAN YACHT CLUB

Today we share with you a cap badge for a visor cap which was worn by members of the KYC. The badge is oval shaped with a a black velvet background. In the center is an enameled metal badge with a multi colored Eagle. Atop the shield we see a gold bullion crown. There is also the initials “K” “Y” embroidered on either side of the enameled metal badge. At the 6 o’clock position we see a gold bullion anchor with a “C” superimposed over it.
The badge has been removed from a cap and shows modest and not excessive wear on both the obverse and reverse.

PRUSSIA – POSTCARD – ADMIRAL EDUARD VON KNORR – NAVY

PRUSSIA – POSTCARD – ADMIRAL EDUARD VON KNORR – NAVY

PRUSSIA – POSTCARD – ADMIRAL EDUARD VON KNORR – NAVY.

Eduard von Knorr was a 19th Century Kaiserliche Marine Admiral who helped establish Germany’s colonial empire. He went from fighting against pirates off Morocco’s coast when he first went to sea in 1856, to receiving the 1870 Iron Cross 2nd Class for a battle with a French ship near Havana, Cuba, during the Franco-Prussian War. He became a Konteradmiral in 1883, was promoted to Vizeadmiral in 1889, became an Admiral in 1895, then was knighted in 1896. Along the way, he played various roles in Germany’s African and Pacific colonies.

The postcard depicts him seated with a Red Eagle Order 2nd Class at his throat, and an 1870 Iron Cross 2nd Class in his buttonhole. The postcard is in excellent condition and has never been mailed.

POSTCARD – ADMIRAL von POHL

This is a postcard of Admiral Hugo von Pohl (1855-1916). Pohl achieved the rank of full-admiral. He commanded the High Seas Fleet in 1915. He relinquished this command in 1916 to Reinhard Scheer. Pohl was a proponent of unrestricted submarine warfare. He died soon after he stepped down. He is seen here in uniform, wearing a Red Eagle Order 1st Class with Crown and Swords. The postcard was not mailed.

POSTCARD – ADMIRAL EDUARD von KNORR

Eduard von Knorr (1840-1920) was an important (full) admiral in the Kaiserliche Marine. He was involved in the German colonies’ expansion of the 1880’s and 1890’s. He commanded squadrons in Asia and Africa, and helped set up several German colonies. He achieved his final rank of Admiral in 1893, then retired from active service in 1899. He was awarded the 1870 Iron Cross 2nd Class for action against the French. He is wearing it on the postcard, along with the Twenty-Five-Year Oak Leaves and an Order of the Red Eagle. He is seated holding his sword. The postcard was produced during WW I. It was mailed as a Feldpostkarte in 1916.

POSTCARD – PRINZ AUGUST WILHELM – PRUSSIA

This postcard shows Kaiser Wilhelm’s fourth son, Prinz August Wilhelm (1887-1949). He is in the 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß’s uniform. He is wearing a medal bar with a Red Eagle Order 3rd Class and a Breast Star, which appears to be for the Black Eagle Order. All Hohenzollern Princes were invested with the order.

POSTCARD – PRINZ AUGUST WILHELM – WIFE – PRUSSIA

This postcard shows Kaiser Wilhelm’s fourth son, Prinz August Wilhelm (1887-1949) and his wife Prinzessin Alexandra Viktoria of Schleswig-Holstein (1887-1957). He is in the 1. Garde-Regiment zu Fuß’s uniform. Please note his breast star. He is also wearing a medal bar sporting a Red Eagle Order 3rd Class with Crown.

SAXE-COBURG-GOTHA – RIBBON BAR – SEVEN PLACE

SAXE-COBURG-GOTHA – RIBBON BAR – SEVEN PLACE

This is an officer’s-level seven-place ribbon bar. Included in the ribbons are the 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class for Non Combatants, Kriegshilfekreuz, Red Eagle Order, Crown Order, Officer’s Long Service Award, Kaiser Wilhelm I Centennial Medal, and a medal from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. This was most likely a ribbon bar for a doctor. Seldom do we see the Iron Cross 2nd Class with the Non Combatants ribbon.

GERMANY – MEDAL BAR – TWO PLACE

GERMANY – MEDAL BAR – TWO PLACE

This is a very unusual combination for a medal bar. It has two places. From left to right we see the following:

*Red Eagle Order 4th Class. This is the final pattern of the Red Eagle, which was offered from 1879-1918. The pattern is easily identified by its pebbled arms. The 4th Class, while the same size as the 3rd Class, has silver arms. The 3rd Class Red Eagle is the first class to exhibit enameled arms. The enamel center is in excellent condition with no visible cracks. 4th Class Red Eagle’s hallmarks typically appear on the 6 o’clock arm’s edge. The example does not exhibit a manufacturer’s hallmark. The cross is clearly made of silver.

*War Service Cross.

The 4th Class Red Eagle was very often awarded to civilians from the middle or upper classes. This is a fine medal bar.

PRUSSIA – RANGLISTE – 1898 – ARMY RANG-UND-QUARTIER-LISTE

PRUSSIA – RANGLISTE – 1898 – ARMY RANG-UND-QUARTIER-LISTE

Here we have the Prussian Army’s 1898 Rang-Und Quartier-Liste. This is a more complete listing than a pure Rangliste. It is a larger book physically than a Rangliste. Regiments and other units from Württemberg, Baden, Hesse-Darmstadt, Braunschweig, and Anhalt are also listed within the book. [No Saxon or Bavarian units appear in a Prussian Rangliste because each kingdom published its own]. The volume measures 2 ½” x 5 ½” x 8 5/16,” and weighs 3 pounds, 6 ounces. In addition to actual field units (from the Armeekorps down), it contains a listing of officers who served on the General Staff and at the War Ministry. An interesting feature of Ranglisten is their display of officers’ awarded orders and decorations. For example, one can find several senior officers who were awarded the 1870 Iron Cross. Officers who received the Red Eagle Order, the Crown Order, and so on also appear. The book is in excellent condition with a tight, firm binding. The pages’ print quality is excellent, revealing crisp pages that are little changed after more than one-hundred-years of existence. The title page features an unidentified officer’s bold signature. [I do not know if he did this to show it was his personal property, or if the book was a gift to a fellow officer]. [SALES ON ALL RANGLISTEN ARE FINAL. We do NOT send them out on approval, or for someone to do research and then return them. Please keep this in mind when ordering any Rangliste].

1913 PRUSSIAN ARMY RANGLISTE

This is the 1913 Prussian Army Rangliste. Regiments and other units from Württemberg, Baden, Hesse-Darmstadt, Braunschweig, and Anhalt are also listed within the book. [No Saxon or Bavarian units appear in a Prussian Rangliste because each kingdom published its own]. The volume measures 2″ x 5 ½” x 8 ½,” and weighs 2 pounds, 6 ounces. In addition to actual field units (from the Armeekorps down), it contains a listing of officers who served on the General Staff and at the War Ministry. An interesting feature of Ranglisten is their display of officers’ awarded orders and decorations. For example, one can find several senior officers who were awarded the 1870 Iron Cross. Officers who received the Red Eagle Order, the Crown Order, and so on also appear. The book is in excellent condition with a tight, firm binding. The print quality is excellent, revealing crisp pages that are little changed after more than one-hundred-years of existence. [SALES ON ALL RANGLISTEN ARE FINAL. We do NOT send them out on approval, or for someone to do research and then return them. Please keep this in mind when ordering any Rangliste].

PRUSSIA – DOCUMENT GROUP FOR AN OFFICER SERVING IN GARDE-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT

PRUSSIA – DOCUMENT GROUP FOR AN OFFICER SERVING IN GARDE-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT

This is an interesting document group that covers nearly forty years of an officer’s service in the Prussian Army. It is for an officer named Adolf Werner. This man saw action in two wars (1866 and 1870). He even saw service in Germany’s Chinese colony. Included in the group are the following:

Document for the Cross for Combatants at the Battle of Königgratz, where the Prussian shattered the Austrian forces on 3 July 1866. At this time Werner was assigned to a Garde-Artillerie-Regiment.

Document for the Combatants Medal for Service in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871. At this point Werner was still serving in a Garde-Artillerie-Regiment.

Promotion Patent dated 18 December 1895. It appears that he was assigned to a post with the Army High Command or the War Ministry. This document is boldly signed in ink by Kaiser Wilhelm II. Over his signature is a large and impressive embossed stamp showing the Prussian Coat-of-Arms.

A transmittal letter for a decoration that I cannot decipher, dated 1899. It comes from the castle at Charlottenburg in Berlin.

Award document for the Non Combatant (in “Steel”) Medal for Service in the Chinese Expedition. This document is dated 24 February 1901. Documents for the Combatant and Non Combatant Medals for the Chinese Expedition during the Boxer Rebellion are VERY difficult to find.

Transmittal letter and award document for the Red Eagle 4th Class from 1904. The transmittal letter is on the stationary of the General-Ordenskommission and bears the signature of the head of the Ordenskommission. The official address of the offices of the Ordenskommission was at Wilhelmstraße 63.

Two additional transmittal documents from the Ordenskommission later in 1904. I cannot tell the purpose of these two documents, but these were prepared at the palace of Charlottenburg in Berlin.

This is a fine set of documents to a man who served three Kaisers. A very scarce signature from Kaiser Wilhelm II is included on an officer’s patent.

PRUSSIA – AWARD DOCUMENT GROUP TO ARTHUR HAY

PRUSSIA – AWARD DOCUMENT GROUP TO ARTHUR HAY

I have been holding onto this document group for more than three years. I kept it partly because it is extremely interesting. Another reason: it took a long time to familiarize myself adequately with its contents so I could describe it. It concerns a Prussian officer with the unexpected name “Arthur Hay.” Hay went from an Unteroffizier in 1886, to at least the rank of Oberstleutnant in 1917. He started in the cavalry and served in both Ulanen, Husaren and Dragoon regiments prior to the war’s outbreak. He achieved the coveted rank of Rittmeister well before the war began in 1914. As best as I can make out, he went from the cavalry to the infantry [as the war developed, most cavalry fought as dismounted troops. WW I showed once and for all that mounted troops were outmoded]. He served as an infantryman until the end of the war. I do not know his final rank, but he may have gone on to be an oberst, or possibly a general. I will leave this as part of the fun for the eventual buyer researching this man. Hay served at least THIRTY years in uniform. He survived the war and even received the Hindenburg Cross in 1935. No less than SIX Promotion Patents are present, covering him from the ranks of Unteroffizier up to major. Each patent is very ornate and hand printed by a skilled calligrapher, with special seals. Also in this group are many award documents. Of his three wartime decorations, we see the documents for his 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class and his Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order (HHO). The latter document is signed by the Graf Zeppelin, prior to his death in 1917. I have never seen his signature on an award document; having it on an HHO document is a real plus! There are a couple of other documents that I have not described which enhance the group. Below is a listing of this amazing group’s contents:

Promotion Patent: from Unteroffizier to Portopee Fähnrich, dated 13 November 1886.

Promotion Patent: from Portopee Fähnrich to Second-Lieutenant, dated 17 September 1887. [I find this interesting, note the old-fashioned use of the French rank: “second-lieutenant”].

Promotion Patent: from Second-Lieutenant to Premier-Lieutenant, dated 14 November 1895. I again find it interesting, the old-fashioned use of the French ranks second-lieutenant and premier-lieutenant.

Promotion Patent: from Oberleutnant to Rittmeister, dated 10 September 1908, personally signed by Kaiser Wilhelm II. Why he has a second document for this same rank, I do not fully understand.

Promotion Patent: from Rittmeister to Major, dated 17 September 1909, again with the personal signature of Kaiser Wilhelm II.

Award document for the Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order, dated 20 May 1917 while Hay was an oberstleutnant. It is signed by Graf Zeppelin!

Award document for the Prussian Crown Order 4th Class, dated 12 May 1901.

Award document for the Red Eagle Order 4th Class, dated 11 May 1908.

Award document for the Kaiser Wilhelm I Centennial Medal.

1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class. The document is double-dated. The date 3 November 1914 appears, which is the document’s original award date. The document was prepared on 5 June 1916. This either is the document’s reissue date, or they were correcting an oversight.

Award document to the Hamburg Hanseatic Cross, dated 12 March 1917.

Award document for the Hindenburg Cross for Combatants, dated 1935.

[A helpful reader has done some additional research on Arthur Hay. As you can see from the list below, published research shows that our man eventually achieved the rank of Generalmajor at his retirement in 1919. He was born in 1866 and died in 1940. (I only wish that the additional three patents were available). It remains an amazing group with even more opportunities for research. Also, in the book Hussars and Mounted Rifles. . . by D. H. Hagger, page 30 displays a photograph of Oberleutnant Hay when he was a member of Husaren Regiment Nr 9! It is wonderful to put a face with the name. MANY thanks to Chris F. for his research and diligence!

[Sekondelieutenant: 17 Sep 1887
Premierlieutenant: 14 Nov 1895
Rittmeister: 21 Sep 1898
Major: 17 Sep 1909
Oberstleutnant: 24 Dec 1914
Oberst: 6 Nov 1917
Generalmajor aD: 1919]

This wonderful group follows the very successful military career of a young man who came up from the ranks. It includes two signatures from Kaiser Wilhelm II, and a signature from the legendary Graf Zeppelin.

AWARD DOCUMENT – GENERAL HONOR DECORATION – PRUSSIA

AWARD DOCUMENT – GENERAL HONOR DECORATION – PRUSSIA

This is an award document for the General Honor Decoration from Prussia. The modestly-priced document appears in the same general format used by Prussia to award many of its decorations. This included the Orden Pour le Mérite, the Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order, the Red Eagle, the Crown Order, etc. The document measures 13″ x 8 1/4.” It was awarded in November 1903. The document is signed by the Prussian Ordenskanzler, Prinz Salm-Hortsmar. The document has previously been folded in quarters.

PRUSSIA – ALLGEMEINES EHRENZEICHEN 2nd CLASS AND AWARD DOCUMENT IN THE ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE

PRUSSIA – ALLGEMEINES EHRENZEICHEN 2nd CLASS AND AWARD DOCUMENT IN THE ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE

This is a mini group of the Allgemeines Ehrenzeichen 2nd Class in silver. The civil decoration was first awarded in two classes during the 1810 Napoleonic War, while König Friedrich Wilhelm III ruled Prussia. Our offering today is the final version, which was awarded from 1895 through 1917. The decoration is in nearly-mint condition. It measures 1 1/2″ in diameter. The 2nd Class was only awarded in silver. The obverse displays König Friedrich Wilhelm III’s royal cypher. The reverse states “Verdienst Um Den Staat” (Service for the State). The decoration is housed in a black leatherette case that measures 2″ x 2 3/4″ x 3/4.” Inside the case gold trim runs around the frame’s edges. The case opens from the side rather than from the bottom. The silk liner on the left is black, while the case’s fitted bottom is lined in black velvet. An 13″ length of original red and white ribbon is laid over the decoration’s top. The original urkunde (award document), measuring 13″ x 8,” is included. The document is in the same format used by virtually all Prussian decorations, including the Red Eagle Orders, Crown Orders, Hohenzollern House Orders, and even the Orden Pour le Mérite. The man receiving the award was named Wilhelm Geuting. The award was made in September 1902! Below the basic information, the document is signed by Kaiser Wilhelm II’s Ordens Kanzler. It is a beautiful set, in superb condition.

PRUSSIA – STATUE – HUSSAR – DELUXE LEATHER PRESENTATION CASE

PRUSSIA – STATUE – HUSSAR – DELUXE LEATHER PRESENTATION CASE

I have had the pleasure of offering a number of interesting statues over the years. This one is a more unusual example than most. The statue is that of a Hussar. I believe he is Austro-Hungarian. He is wearing a shako complete with its parade plume. The man stands tall, wearing both his sword and rifle slung over his shoulder. His cartridge box is prominent at his waist. The figure’s actual height is 5 3/16.” He is mounted on a circular base, which is in turn mounted on a marble square. The marble base has green felt on its bottom to prevent the statue from sliding on a smooth surface. The presentation’s overall height is 6 3/8.” It is also important to note that the statue has a wonderful patina. I believe it was manufactured of “German Silver” (nickel). I can detect no signs of a hallmark. Although the statue and its superior quality are extremely interesting, it is the presentation case that adds that extra measure of captivating luxury. The case’s exterior is red leatherette. It measures 8 1/4″ x 3 1/8″ x 3 5/8.” Two snaps at the front keep the case closed when not on display or during transport. When the clasps are released, the two halves swing open to display the statue within. (It makes a stunning presentation with the doors swung back and the Hussar shining inside). The case must have been produced by a true craftsman as its construction is quite intricate. I would venture to say that the manufacturer was kept busy with the design and construction of other cases, especially presentation cases for Austrian and/or Prussian high-end orders. The red leatherette material is very similar to that seen on the cases for the Order of the Red Eagle.

Germany – Photograph – Hans Von Gronau – Signed

Germany – Photograph – Hans Von Gronau – Signed

We recently acquired a large collection of signed postcards, private photos, letters, etc. of German Admirals, Generals, etc. Many of these items were acquired by a single collector who would write to the subject and receive in return a signed photograph, postcard, letter. Etc. The name of this collector was Paul Baer and his name appears on many of the items offered….

 

GERMANY – SANKE CARD – GENERALLEUTNANT ERNST VON HOEPPNER – NR 505

GERMANY – SANKE CARD – GENERALLEUTNANT ERNST VON HOEPPNER – NR 505

This is Sanke card Nr 505 of Generalleutnant Ernst von Hoeppner (1860-1922). Von Hoeppner served in many roles with the army from staff positions to command positions. In 1916 he was appointed as the head of the Imperial German Air Service (Kommandierender General der Luftstreitkräfte) reporting directly to Generalfeldmarschall Paul von Hindenburg….

 

 

GERMANY – SANKE CARD – GENERALLEUTNANT ERNST VON HOEPPNER – NR 427

GERMANY – SANKE CARD – GENERALLEUTNANT ERNST VON HOEPPNER – NR 427

Sanke card Nr 427 of Generalleutnant Ernst von Hoeppner (1860-1922). Von Hoeppner served in many roles within the army from staff positions to command positions. In 1916 he was appointed as the head of the Imperial German Air Service (Kommandierender General der Luftstreitkräfte) reporting directly to Generalfeldmarschall Paul von Hindenburg….

 

KNIGHT’S CROSS WITH SWORDS OF THE HOHENZOLLERN HOUSE ORDER – PRUSSIA.

KNIGHT’S CROSS WITH SWORDS OF THE HOHENZOLLERN HOUSE ORDER – PRUSSIA.

The Knight’s Cross with Swords of the Hohenzollern House Order (KCHHO) was one of the most important of the Imperial German decorations. It was founded during Prussian König Friedrich Wilhelm IV’s reign. He was König Friedrich Wilhelm III’s eldest son. The latter led Prussia during the Napoleonic Wars. The decoration was founded in 1851. During WW I, it was awarded to officers (only) who previously had been awarded the Iron Crosses 1st and 2nd Class (in most cases). Generally, the KCHHO was to have been awarded BEFORE the Orden Pour le Mérite (PLM). This was not a firm and fast rule, however. Sometimes it was skipped or quickly awarded before the nomination for the PLM was put forward.

Prussia – Spiked Helmet – Officer – Cuirassier KR 2

Prussia – Spiked Helmet – Officer – Cuirassier KR 2

Lovely Cuirassier officer’s helmet from KR 2 that dates to around the turn of the 20th century. The unit was formed in April 1717 in Pasewalk and participated in the War of Austrian Succession under the leadership of Frederick against the Saxons and Austrians. They triumphed in the battle at Hohenfreidberg in southwestern Poland on 4 June 1745. (The area is now called Strzegyom.) And in 1845 the regiment was honored with the addition of the “Hohenfreidberg 1745” honor banner to their helmet plates. It was because of this brilliant victory on the battlefield that Frederick became known as Frederick the Great….

 

Germany – Postcard – August Von Mackensen – Autographed

Germany – Postcard – August Von Mackensen – Autographed

We recently acquired a large collection of signed postcards, private photos, letters, etc. of German Admirals, Generals, etc. Many of these items were acquired by a single collector who would write to the subject and receive in return a signed photograph, postcard, letter. Etc. The name of this collector was Paul Baer and his name appears on many of the items offered….

 

Prussia – Pickelhaube / Spiked Helmet – General A La Suite

Prussia – Pickelhaube / Spiked Helmet – General A La Suite

This is a wonderfully conditioned spike helmet for a Prussian General a la Suité. In terms of numbers of generals of this type as opposed to line generals, there are fewer in numbers than those of line generals. Typically an officer who wore this helmet was an aide or an officer who did not have command responsibilities. Likely he was a royal or at the very least a high ranking noble who was a “part time” soldier….

 

 

Prussia – Pickelhaube / Spiked Helmet – Reserve Officer – Dragoner Regiment – With Transportation Case

Prussia – Pickelhaube / Spiked Helmet – Reserve Officer – Dragoner Regiment – With Transportation Case

This is a fine example of a Prussian Reserve officer in a Dragoner-Regiment. A Reserve Officer spike helmet like this is indeed uncommon. The leather body of the spike helmet is in exceptional condition with no problems. The front visor is squared as is correct for a Dragoner-Regiment. The wappen is silver toned and has a reserve officer cross below the chest of the Eagle, The chin scales, cruciform, pearl ring, and extra tall spike are also silver toned. The officer stars are gold toned. The correct officer kokarden for State and Reich are in place….