Der Rittmeister Militaria, LLC, Imperial German Merchandise Swords, Daggers, Miniature Swords, Degens, Bayonets, Portopees.
Updated on 11 October 2014.
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Navy Daggers - Swords

 

13-625 IDENTIFIED NAVY OFFICER SWORD. This is a typical naval officer’s sword in good condition. It measures 36" in length from its lionshead’s top to the bottom of the drag. The triple-wire wrapped grip looks like it might be made of walrus tusk rather than ivory. It sports some dark striations that make me suspect this, but I am no ivory/walrus tusk expert! The lionshead does not have glass chips for eyes, just a plain brass finish. The sword hilt’s folding lock mechanism is engraved with the owner’s last name, Röder. A quick look in one of my German naval research works revealed his full name was Alfred Röder. He entered the Kaiserliche Marine in 1912. He later saw service as a Kriegsoffizier with Lehrkommando 350, in July 1944. His rank was as an Oberleutnant zur See. I did not find information on his WW I service in my brief search. The blade, which measures 30 ½" is engraved with naval designs. The engraving is somewhat faded from age. The blade has several small black spots on it where it is slightly corroded. They do not detract from the blade’s overall appearance. The manufacturer’s name is listed on the blade’s non cutting edge, but has been somewhat obscured by one of the black marks. It reads "obrecht Hoflieferant Berlin." Hoflieferant means "purveyor to the king’s court." The leather scabbard is in pleasing condition. It has the traditional two leather sections with three brass trim and adornment areas. Two scabbard rings are present.

Overall, it is a well made, engaging naval officer’s sword. $2,095.00

 

 

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13-696 NAVY DAGGER PIN. In the past we have offered miniatures of the German naval dagger. We have never offered one quite like this! This miniature was intended either as a tie tack or as a lady’s pin. It has a safety on the reverse. The attaching pin is mounted to the scabbard’s reverse. The dagger actually can be withdrawn from its scabbard, to which it is attached by a very fine gold-toned chain. When withdrawn, we see that the blade is plain, with a high-silver finish. The overall dagger length (in the scabbard) is 2 1/4." When withdrawn from the scabbard, the dagger measures 1 1/2" in length. The scabbard by itself measures 1 1/2." It is a very handsome decorative piece which can be worn by that special person (or you) on dress-up occasions! $695.00

 

 

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13-811 ORIGINAL CATALOG - AUGUST LÜNEBURG. This is a catalog from the August Lüneberg firm, which had offices in Kiel and Flensburg during the Imperial German Period. They sold naval officers’ daggers, portepees, etc. The catalog measures 9 1/4" x 12 1/4" and has a total of ten pages. The firm’s specialty was officers’ daggers. Several pages showcase their various models. The blades exhibit various levels of engraving. Even Damascus blades are listed. I see full daggers ranging from 30 to 70 Marks for a dagger with a Damascus blade. Farther along are such things as officers’ belts, belts with hangers, and portepees. [My mouth really watered when I saw a Konteradmiral’s epaulettes for 70.50 marks! His daily-use uniform’s shoulder boards cost 13.75 marks]. Lüneberg’s also sold miniatures of decorations that could be attached to tie chains. The back page’s reverse features pistols from such firms as Browning, Mauser, etc.
Although complete, the catalog is NOT in perfect condition. Some foxing affects its pages. It also has a cut where a portion of the paper is missing on several pages.
$195.00
 

 

 

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Swords - Misc.

 

07-158 HUSAREN-REGIMENT Nr 17 OFFICER’S SWORD WITH PORTOPEE - BRAUNSCHWEIG. In Imperial Germany, a total of four regiments wore the Totenkopf on their headdresses. One infantry regiment, Infanterie-Regiment Nr 92, came from Braunschweig. The three cavalry regiments all were Husaren-Regiments, displaying the Totenkopf on their busbies, schirmützen, and mützen. These regiments included 1. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Nr 1, 2. Leib-Husaren-Regiment Königin Victoria von Preußen Nr 2 from Prussia, and Husaren-Regiment Nr 17 from the Duchy of Braunschweig.
Husaren-Regiment Nr 17 fought extensively with Wellington in the Napoleonic Wars. On their busbies they proudly wore the battle bandeaux from the Napoleonic Wars’ Peninsula, Sicilien, Waterloo, and Mars la Tour from the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War. This proud regiment was founded in 1809, and garrisoned in the capital city of Braunschweig. It was attached to the X. Armeekorps. Its troops followed their famed ruler the "Black Duke," Herzog Friedrich Wilhelm (1771-1815), to the Battle of Waterloo in which he perished.
Today, we are offering you a fine officer’s sword from this regiment. The sword displays silver fittings and a black Bakelite® grip. Attached to the grip is a small black portopee. The guard has a folding clam shell arrangement similar to that seen on naval officer’s swords, which folds down when not in use. An eagle is displayed on the handle’s guard. Another portion further protects the hand’s other side. The blade is beautifully engraved on both sides. Floral motifs appear, and on one side a Totenkopf, as well as a charge by mounted Husaren troopers, is depicted. The other side displays a mounted Husaren officer, along with a deep-blue panel engraved with the title "Braunchw. Husaren-Regt. Nr 17." The engraving on both sides and the blue panel makes the sword a dream to display on one’s wall.
The blade measures 33" in length. It is in superior condition. The black, painted scabbard has some paint missing in places, especially at the drag. The scabbard measures 39" It displays a single ring through which the sword was secured to a sword belt.
It has been years since we have been able to offer you a sword as clean, and in as good a condition, as is this one.
$2,495.00

 

 

 

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07-121 OFFICER SWORD - SCHLOß-GARDE-KOMPAGNIE. The story of the Schloß-Garde-Kompagnie is one of the more interesting to come from the Kingdom of Prussia. I only started learning about the Schloß-Garde-Kompagnie a few years ago. Like many Imperial German Period collectors, I had not heard of the Schloß-Garde-Kompagnie. I misunderstood their role as compared to the Regiment der Garde du Corps. I had also thought of the Garde du Corps as the Kaiser’s personal guard. I thought this function was true for all situations. We have all seen photographs of the Kaiser in the field or on parade with men from the Garde du Corps surrounding him, holding his personal standard.

This was all true, however, the Schloß-Garde-Kompagnie served as the Kaiser’s personal guard at his palaces. They were a highly-decorative unit in performing this function. To that end, highly-experienced soldiers who had proven themselves in previous duties were selected for the Schloß-Garde-Kompagnie. It was, in fact, Kompagnie sized. Generally one officer commanded the Kompagnie while all the other soldiers were feldwebels.

Today we are offering one of the rarest edged weapons from the Imperial German Period. It is a very handsome ceremonial officer’s sword from the Schloß-Garde-Kompagnie. The sword is technically known as a Court Degen. It has brass fittings. Its hilt is silver-wire-wrapped. The degen’s pommel is a magnificent crown. The blade is unadorned and shows no manufacturer’s hallmarking. The scabbard is black leather with brass fittings. Sheathed, the degen measures 39 1/4" from the crown’s top to the scabbard’s bottom. Unsheathed from the scabbard, the degen measures 39" from the crown’s tip to the sword point. The blade itself measures 32 3/4" from the felt buffer to its tip.

I must share with you the fact that this degen has undergone a complete restoration by Germany’s premiere restoration expert specializing in swords and pickelhauben. This man is nothing short of a genius at his craft. Had he not assured me that the sword could be restored to its former glory, I would not have purchased it. The scabbard in particular is amazing, compared to what I saw when I first purchased it. Every detail of the degen has been lovingly-looked after. This man’s work is so good, I believe many experienced blade collectors would not realize it has been restored and presumed that this sword was in its original state. It is a VERY rare sword, one of the most important we have offered.

Take a good look at the extensive photographs accompanying our description, because you may never get to see another sword like this one!   $9,495.00

 

 

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07-111 IDENTIFIED SWORD - BELT & PORTOPEE - FUTURE REGIMENTAL COMMANDER (LATER GENERALMAJOR) - CHEVAULEGERS-REGIMENT Nr 5 - BAVARIA. This is a very high-quality sword that once belonged to the Regimental Commander, Oberstleutnant Franz Ritter Edler von Schultes, of 5. Chevaulegers-Regiment Großherzog Friedrich von Österreich. Schultes commanded the regiment at WW I’s outbreak. He was born in 1866, and became a leutnant in 1887. He was promoted to the rank of oberleutnant in 1895. These dates are important to remember. He worked his way through the officers’ ranks, and was appointed an oberstleutnant in 1913. He apparently was appointed regimental commander shortly after his promotion to oberstleutnant.

[Although I was not able to personally research what became of him after WW I’s beginning, one of our faithful readers read our description when we first offered this sword, and advised me that von Schultes was promoted to Oberst on 11 October 1914. Furthermore, he was promoted to Generalmajor and Kommandeur of the 1. Bayerische Kavallerie-Brigade on 6 July 1918. He held that post until the end of the war. We gratefully thank James W. from California for this most helpful information]. [Please note that the "Ritter" designation meant he (or perhaps his father or grandfather) was knighted by the Bavarian Government]. The sword is a Lionshead. Its grip is wrapped in leather and triple-wired. The leather shows some wear. A few small patches are missing, which we will show in the accompanying photographs. The hand guard features the rampant Bavarian Lion grasping Bavaria’s shield in his claws.

Engraved on the guard’s side is von Schultes’ name and rank (Leutnant), and the year, 1891. Attached to the sword is an officer’s portopee, and the elaborate belt that attached onto his tunic via hangers. The scabbard is a nickel-plated example, and in very fine condition. It features double-rings, which were correct for this part of the late-19th Century. As we remove the sword from the scabbard, we see that it was manufactured by WK&C. The blade is engraved on both sides with the Bavarian motto "In Treue Fest." The blade is in sparkling condition, with a beautiful finish. The felt buffer at the blade’s top, where it connects with the scabbard, is also in place. It is one of the confirmations of an edged weapon in fine condition.

It is a simply stunning sword for a man who went on to become a regimental commander, and a Brigade commander holding the rank of Generalmajor during WW I. $2,795.00

 

 

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07-103 KÜRAßIER LINE-OFFICER STICHDEGEN - PRUSSIA. This is the Stichdegen for a küraßier line-officer. Not only that, it is a World War I period example, as opposed to a pre World War I piece. This is actually harder to find than a prewar Stichdegen. When you think about it, most of the küraßier officers already had swords since they had been in küraßier regiments before the outbreak of the war. This sword would have been for an officer who might have been newly transferred to a küraßier line-regiment, or perhaps needed to replace his prewar sword. This sword is similar in general appearance to the Stichdegen above. It measures 37" from the pommel to the tip of the scabbard. It measures 35" from the tip of the pommel to the tip of the blade. With just a glance, one can see the difference in quality between the two swords.

Like the other sword, this is silver wire-wrapped on the grip. I cannot tell if it is wrapped over sharkskin or not, as was the custom with top-quality swords before the beginning of WW I. It is physically a smaller sword than the other. The handguard is also considerably smaller. At first look the scabbard appears quite similar to the other Stichdegen; however, it is leather-wrapped over steel as opposed to wood. It has two brass fittings at the top and the bottom of the scabbard. The buffer is in place between the top of the blade and the scabbard. This provides for a good tight fit. The blade is plain and not engraved. It is, however, marked for the manufacturer.

This is a fine wartime production sword in very fine condition. $1,250.00  

 

 

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07-94 PRESENTATION ARTILLERY LIONSHEAD SWORD. This is a very high quality presentation sword. It was a gift from one officer who served in 1. Posensches Feld-Artilleree-Regiment Nr 20 to another. {This was a Prussian regiment that was raised in 1872 right after the end of the 1870/1871 Franco-Prussian War. The regiment was established at a time when the German Army was building up.

Approximately twelve artillery regiments were formed in 1872}. This is a beautiful lionshead sword that has excellent gilding on the pommel and the lionshead. The sword has a superbly conditioned grip covered in sharkskin and is triple wire-wrapped. I’ll return to the lionshead at the end of the description, as it has an interesting feature I would like to share with you. As we pull the blade from the scabbard we can see it is slightly curved. The overall length of the sword is 40." The length of the blade is 34."

The blade is beautifully engraved. It has a black paneled design with gilt trim. The one side shows the presentation of the sword to a "Günther," who served in this regiment during the late 19th Century. He returned to service in the same regiment then served until the end of the war. The other side of the blade carries forward the same black/blue design in a military and floral manner. The scabbard is a black design with two rings. The scabbard’s ring area is decorative and gilt-colored for contrast. The final detail (and what I find most striking) is that the lion’s eyes are blue! Of course, red and green eyes are commonly seen. I have even been told of some white and yellow examples, but this is the first time that I have seen blue.

This is a very striking sword and quite attractive. The blade of the sword has been uncleaned for decades. While I am not overly keen on cleaning swords, they are, in my opinion, one of the few items that could be cleaned with an excellent product called Simichrome. It is a polish that first came to my attention in the 1960's for polishing expensive automobile wheels without scratching them.

This is, of course, VERY important if cleaning is to be done. $2,595.00

 

 

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07-116 NCO SWORD - GARDE-REITER-REGIMENT - SAXONY. This is a sword for an NCO from Königl Sächs Garde-Reiter-Regiment (1. Schweres Regiment) (GRR). The regiment was founded in 1680. It was garrisoned in the capital of Saxony, Dresden and assigned to the XII. Armeekorps. The sword was used by a Senior NCO or an officer in the GRR. The sword measures 34 1/4" from the tip of the pommel to the tip of the blade. It also measures 35 1/4" from end to end of the scabbard. The scabbard displays excellent paint. It has a single ring. The grip is Bakelite®. The guard, which features Saxony’s Coat-of-Arms, folds down.

The exterior has all silver fittings. As we remove the sword from the scabbard, we see that it is hallmarked for WK & C. The blade, which is slightly curved, is double engraved. One side displays Saxony’s Coat-of-Arms. The other side boasts the regiment’s royal cypher, which was seen on their regular service shoulder boards. Their dress shoulder boards carried the Saxon Crown. The blade is thin. It measures 1/2" wide. The edge of the sword is also engraved for a sword firm in Leipzig. It is my guess that while WK & C produced the blade, the firm in Leipzig did the engraving. The blade is in very fine condition, overall. It has a portion of the buffer that protects the blade from the scabbard’s mouth.

It is a superb sword from a very elite regiment. $2,695.00  

 

 

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07-125 ARTILLERY OFFICER LIONSHEAD SWORD - PORTOPEE. This is a high-quality, lionshead officer’s sword from a Prussian artillery regiment. A lionshead sword is the classic German officer’s sword. Its grip displays the dramatic lion’s head, which features twin red glass eyes. The grip is wrapped in sharkskin. Crossed artillery cannon tubes are depicted on the extension running down from the cross guard. A handsome Prussian officer’s portopee is attached. It is in appealing condition. The scabbard is painted black, and has an unusual feature. The two hangers and their attachment to the scabbard are gold-toned, instead of the usual black. The scabbard measures 34 3/4" in length. The sword measures 38 1/4" from the lionshead’s top to the sword’s tip. Both sides of the blade are engraved.

The engraving shows some wear, but the sword remains quite attractive. $995.00

 

 

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07-148 XMRWG FELD-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT Nr 4 "BLUE PANEL" OFFICER’S SWORD WITH PORTOPEE - PRUSSIA. This is a consignment item. It is an officer’s "P" Guard sword with its scabbard, in fine condition. It represents Feldartillerie-Regiment Prinz-Regent Luitpold (Magdeburgisches) Nr 4. The regiment was founded in 1816, shortly after the Napoleonic Wars ended. It was garrisoned at Sprottau and assigned to the V. Armeekorps. The sword’s grip is manufactured of Bakelite® and is triple-wire-wrapped. Its blade is quite handsome and is engraved on both sides. Each side has a decorated blue panel that contrasts dramatically against the blade’s silvery surface. (An etched floral design also appears on each side, interspersed with military symbols). On one side we see an artillery caisson with an attached cannon. A spirited team of six horses pulls the caisson and cannon. Seated on the cannon are two soldiers facing rearward. Another two soldiers are seated forward on the caisson. A further three soldiers are astride the horse team (one rider for each yoked pair of horses). The other blue panel features "Feld.-Artill. Regt. Prinz Luitpold v. Bayern (Magdeb.) Nr 4." The blade has no evidence of its manufacturer. A partial red felt buffer is in place.
The scabbard is of the single-ring design. It is painted black, with the paint about 95% complete. The final detail is a Prussian officer’s portopee, which has been tied to the handle. $495.00

 

 

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25-66 XDK INFANTERIE-REGIMENT STANDARD - PRUSSIA. This is a consignment item. The traditions behind the standards (regimental flags) are one of the more interesting stories of Imperial German Militaria. The history and honor of any regiment were tied to its regimental banners. Each infantry regiment was composed of three battalions, and ten to twelve companies. Each battalion in the regiment had its own standard and standard bearer (Fahnenträger), who proudly carried his battalion’s flag. It was a great honor to do so. To begin with, the man usually was a senior NCO. He was attended by two battalion officers. During Napoleonic times, for example, the absolute worst fate any combatant nations’ battalion or regiment could suffer was to lose its standard to the enemy in battle. Defeat was bad enough, but losing a standard was a total catastrophe. The dishonor to that battalion/regiment was incalculable. The battalion/regiment’s commander would be seriously reconsidered by his superiors for this terrible event. It could well lead to a military career’s end. The pomp and ceremony around a regimental standard began with its award to the battalion/regiment. During Kaiser Wilhelm II’s time, the awarding of such flags was a major function. The Kaiser personally issued the flag to the battalion/regiment. An assortment of medallions on the flag pole commemorated the award and other important unit events. The flag pole was also decorated with a special streamer listing the year and other basic information about the regiment. Furthermore, special streamers were attached for any of the regiment’s battle honors. This included battles from the Napoleonic Wars (Waterloo and campaigns in Spain and Portugal were especially prized), the 1864 Danish-Prussian War, the 1866 Austro-Prussian War, and the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War. In the case of the Franco-Prussian War, in addition to any battle honors/streamers awarded, each regiment participating in the war received a special flag topper consisting of an 1870 Grand Cross of the Iron Cross. (This decoration, which was awarded on a limited basis to generals only during the war, is seldom-seen and very expensive). When a man was mustered into a regiment, he swore allegiance to his Kaiser, his fatherland, and his regiment at the regimental flag. The gentleman who has consigned this standard to us advises that approximately thirty infantry regiments employed this particular standard style. Taking into consideration that each regiment had three standards, the maximum was ninety. They were carefully controlled. If one became unserviceable during its "life," it was retired from service and a new one was presented by the Kaiser to the battalion/regiment. I have spoken with advanced collectors who have regimental standards in their collections. I found it interesting that many of them were captured at the end of WW II and sent to Russia. In the 1980's or 1990's, an American-made contact with a museum in the Soviet Union and arrangements were made to release many of them. Naturally, many of them immediately made their way to German museum collections, where they are on display today. A small number of the freed standards found their way into the hands of collectors, which is what we offer you today. How rare are these regimental standards? VERY rare. I have seen a small number of them firsthand (they are breathtaking). This is the first time I have ever offered one to you. Some of the other rare Imperial German Militaria items can be seen more frequently, as they were available by the hundreds or perhaps even by a thousand, depending on the item. Again, this flag was one of perhaps NINETY! From that, deduct the number (your guess is as good as mine on this) that were destroyed during two World Wars. All that survived are perhaps more than one-hundred-years-old by now. I promise you; you will not see these available often. This, ladies and gentlemen is history and I mean, real HISTORY! Banners such as these were produced from silk and embroidered with various colors of bullion. The banner measures 49" x 52 1/4." The flag’s background is white, although being one-hundred-years-old (probably a bit older) it is no longer as snowy white as it once was. The flag weighs 1 pound and 15 ounces. The flag’s central theme on the obverse is a multicolored Hohenzollern Eagle. The Eagle is crowned, with widespread wings. It clasps a sword in one talon and a bundle of thunderbolts in the other. It is enclosed in a laurel leaf wreath. The wreath is in turn topped by a large Hohenzollern Crown. Within the wreath, just above the Eagle, is the motto "Pro-Gloria-Et-Patria" which translates to "For Glory and Fatherland." This was Prussia’s motto. From the central wreath eight diagonal stripes extend to the flag’s four corners. In each of the four corners is a smaller crowned wreath that holds the Kaiser’s cypher. Let us turn for a moment to the standard’s condition, which we will carefully highlight in the large number of photographs that accompany our description. The banner is full and complete. Since it is made of silk, a number of tears and also several holes appear. In the lower left corner you will see partial netting over the crowned cypher. This was done here and generally over the entire flag to offer extra support. I mentioned the weight (1 pound and 15 ounces) earlier. It is important to remember as the weight put a lot of pressure on the flag and made it susceptible to advancing problems as tears and rips developed. The weight is mostly due to the flag’s elaborate bullion in the center and corners. It adds a great deal of weight to an already heavy silk banner. The bullion work is breathtaking. Again, I ask you to pay special attention to the attached photographs. If you look at the flag’s far left side, you will see where it was attached to the flagpole, and where a material flap has partially separated from the flag’s body. The flap folded over the flagpole, however, and you can see the many holes where it was attached. The flag’s reverse is identical, although we will take photos of both sides. This is a truly amazing artifact. You must remember that very few of these have survived, and this flag is historically, very IMPORTANT. I am honored to share it with you on Der Rittmeister Militaria’s web site pages. $31,995.00 Special Reduced Price $26,995.00!!! 2nd and Final Reduction $21,995.00!!!

 

 

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25-69 XDK REGIMENTAL FLAG - FOUL WEATHER COVER. This is a consignment item. The regimental flag or standard was one of a battalion/regiment’s most important possessions. Out of all the government-issued equipment, it was the most-prized. The regimental flag was well protected in battle. It was accorded the respect and best treatment possible. This meant when it was unfurled and on display in front of its battalion along with its attendant battle honors and streamers, or when it was not in use, or when it needed protecting from foul weather. To the latter end, a special foul weather case was created (hence the term "Uncase the colors!"), to protect the treasured regimental flag when not in use. In the case of Imperial Germany, the case was made of oilskin. It protected the flag within from even the harshest rain. The case is lined with what I would term a cotton flannel. The case measures 59 1/2" in length, overall. It is important to note that the oilskin exterior of the case has been restored and is not original to the topper. The flag topper is made of brass. The oilskin portion measures 52" x 7," and the flag topper measures 71/4" x 6." The flag topper is made of brass. It features the Kaiser’s crowned royal cypher. If you look carefully at the topper’s base, where it attaches to the oilskin material, you will see a section of bullion tape. It has a fine patina that we are accustomed to seeing on uniforms, etc. This is an amazing accessory that was vital to the protection of the sacred regimental standard. $1,795.00   Reduced Price!! $1,495.00!!! 2nd and Final Reduced Price $1,295.00!!!

 

 

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15-480 FELDGRAU SLEEVE PATCH - REGIMENTAL FAHENTRÄGER - SAXONY. This is an ultra-rare sleeve patch for a Saxon Regimental Fahnenträger. It is a feldgrau version. It was used from about 1907 through 1918 as feldgrau uniforms were phased into service. The patch is quite large and shield-shaped. It measures 4 3/4" x 3 1/4." It is beautifully manufactured with multicolored bullion thread. I see gold, black, silver, green, red, and blue. As you look at the photos, please pay careful attention to the design of the two crossed flags and especially the Saxonian Crown. It fairly wants to jump off the patch at you. Also, at the patch’s bottom, König Friedrich August III’s royal cypher appears in brilliant gold bullion thread. The patch is in very fine condition. Only a hint of moth tracking shows on the two side panels. I do not believe this was ever issued. It would make an important addition to any collection. $1,595.00

 

 

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15-564 PREWAR REGIMENTAL COLOR FAHENTRÄGER SLEEVE PATCH - WÜRTTEMBERG. One of the most honored positions within any regiment was the assignment to carry and maintain its regimental standard. All of the European armies (including Germany) had a fascinating tradition in regimental standards. In Germany, regimental banners or standards were authorized and issued by the König, or Kaiser. It had a true history of pageantry to it. In addition to the actual standard/banner, regiments brandished flagpoles adorned with streamers proclaiming the year of the regiment’s establishment, the regiment’s collective battle honors, and brass identification rings. Depending on the regiment, the pole might even have been topped by a Grand Cross of the Iron Cross. The men fought with great pride under these flags. For a regiment to lose its flag in battle was a horrible event. It rained dishonor on ALL the men attached to the regiment, from its regimental commander down to the lowliest private. The man assigned to maintain and carry the regimental banner (Fahnenträger) was highly-regarded by his officers and NCO’s. He bore the standard, carrying it in a special case when it was not unfurled. He was expected to protect the banner with his life. The sight of the banner waving, even in battle, was a rallying point for the regiment’s men. If the color bearer fell during battle, another man immediately snatched-up the banner to show that the regiment was still in the fight. Naturally, a man so honored as to carry the regimental colors was awarded a special sleeve patch designating him as the regimental color bearer (Fahnenträger). As you can see, the number of color bearers in the German Army was very limited, as was this very special sleeve patch. The patch was intended to have been worn on the pre WW I dunkel-blau (dark-blue) tunic’s sleeve. It measures 5" x 3 ½," and is in the shape of a shield. It sports a pair of crossed regimental flags, beautifully done in yellow, white, and black thread. Between them is a crown from the Kingdom of Württemberg made of yellow, white, and red thread. König Wilhelm II’s yellow royal cypher appears at the patch’s bottom. It is very elegant and quite rare. [As an aside, regimental banners are greatly prized by collectors. Prices BEGIN at $20,000 for these beauties, when they come on the market. I have seen examples fetch in excess of $50,000. They rarely become available. Many of them were taken to Russia at the end of WW II, and were not released until thirty to forty years after its end]. This is an amazing piece of history and far rarer than a Prussian example. $1,495.00

 

 

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15-440 SLEEVE PATCH - REGIMENTAL FAHENTRÄGER PREWAR - FOR A DUNKEL BLAU TUNIC - PRUSSIA. One of the most honored positions within any regiment was the assignment to carry and maintain their regimental standard. All of the European armies, (including Germany), had a fascinating tradition in regimental standards. In Germany, regimental banners or standards were authorized and issued by the König, or Kaiser. It had a true pageantry to it. In addition to the actual standard/banner, regiments brandished flag poles adorned with streamers proclaiming the year of the regiment’s establishment, the regiment’s collective battle honors, and brass identification rings. Depending on the regiment, the pole might even have been topped by a Grand Cross of the Iron Cross. The men fought with great pride under these flags. For a regiment to lose its flag in battle was a horrible event. It rained dishonor on ALL the men attached to the regiment, from its regimental commander down to the lowliest private. The man assigned to maintain and carry the regimental banner was highly-regarded by his officers and NCO’s. He bore the standard, carrying it in a special case when it was not unfurled. He was expected to protect the banner with his life. The sight of the banner waving, even in battle, was a rallying point for the regiment’s men. If the color bearer fell during battle, another man immediately snatched-up the banner to show that the regiment was still in the fight. Naturally, a man so honored as to carry the regimental colors was awarded a special sleeve patch designating him as the regimental color bearer. As you can see, the number of color bearers in the German Army was very limited, as was this very special sleeve patch. The patch was intended to have been worn on the sleeve of the pre WW I dunkel-blau (dark-blue) tunic. It measures 5" x 3 1/2," and is in the shape of a shield. It sports a pair of crossed regimental flags, beautifully done in yellow, white, and black thread. Between them is a Hohenzollern Crown made of yellow, white, and red thread. At the bottom of the patch is Kaiser Wilhelm II’s royal cypher in yellow. It is very elegant and quite rare. [As an aside, regimental banners are greatly prized by collectors. Prices BEGIN at $20,000.00 for these beauties when they come on the market. I have seen examples fetch in excess of $50,000.00. They rarely become available. Many of them were taken to Russia at the end of WW II, and were not released until thirty to forty years after its end]. This is an amazing piece of history. $1,395.00

 

 

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15-441 SLEEVE PATCH - REGIMENTAL FAHENTRÄGER FOR A FELDGRAU TUNIC - PRUSSIA. One of the most honored positions within any regiment was the assignment to carry and maintain their regimental standard. All of the European armies, (including Germany), had a fascinating tradition in regimental standards. In Germany, regimental banners or standards were authorized and issued by the König, or Kaiser. It had a true pageantry to it. In addition to the actual standard/banner, regiments brandished flag poles adorned with streamers proclaiming the year of the regiment’s establishment, the regiment’s collective battle honors, and brass identification rings. Depending on the regiment, the pole might even have been topped by a Grand Cross of the Iron Cross. The men fought with great pride under these flags. For a regiment to lose its flag in battle was a horrible event. It rained dishonor on ALL the men attached to the regiment, from its regimental commander down to the lowliest private. The man assigned to maintain and carry the regimental banner was highly-regarded by his officers and NCO’s. He bore the standard, carrying it in a special case when it was not unfurled. He was expected to protect the banner with his life. The sight of the banner waving, even in battle, was a rallying point for the regiment’s men. If the color bearer fell during battle, another man immediately snatched-up the banner to show that the regiment was still in the fight. Naturally, a man so honored as to carry the regimental colors was awarded a special sleeve patch designating him as the regimental color bearer. As you can see, the number of color bearers in the German Army was very limited, as was this very special sleeve patch. The patch was intended to have been worn on the sleeve of the feldgrau tunic. This example is far larger than a pre WW I sleeve patch. It measures 6 1/2" x 4 1/4" and is in the shape of a shield. It sports a pair of crossed regimental flags, beautifully done in yellow, green, white, and black thread. Between them is a Hohenzollern Crown made of yellow, white, and red thread. At the bottom of the patch is Kaiser Wilhelm II’s royal cypher in red. It is very elegant and quite rare. [As an aside, regimental banners are greatly prized by collectors. Prices BEGIN at $20,000 for these beauties when they come on the market. I have seen examples fetch in excess of $50,000. They rarely become available. Many of them were taken to Russia at the end of WW II, and were not released until thirty to forty years after its end]. This is an amazing piece of history. $1.495.00

 

 

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Miniatures - Kinder Swords

 

07-163 MINIATURE M-1889 IOD PRUSSIAN OFFICER’S SWORD. This is a miniature Prussian M-1889 IOD sword in fine condition. These were very popular during the period as letter openers. It again can be used for that purpose more than one-hundred-years after this particular miniature sword was produced. The sword is 8 ½" in overall length from the tip of the blade to the hilt. On the guard, we see a highly-detailed Hohenzollern Eagle. Its overall condition is very pleasing. $150.00

 

 

 

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07-42 MINIATURE KAISERLICHE MARINE OFFICER SWORD. A very high quality example of the miniature Navy Officers Sword. It features a Lionhead and has the fouled anchor and crown of the Navy. Plain blade and the scabbard has about 50% of its paint which replicates the leather of the full size example. This would make a very nice desk item or perhaps even a letter opener. $375.00

 

 

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07-52 KINDER OR CADET NAVY OFFICER SWORD. Kinder (child's or children's) Swords or Kinder Sabels are a unique sub-collecting area within Imperial German edged weapons. Members of the nobility who had sons often dressed the youngsters in a variety of uniforms which often were duplicates of their own. Of course with the young boys being much smaller than Papa everything was scaled down, including the swords, and thus we have Kinder Swords. This "downsizing" continued on to items such as pickelhauben and even decorations. The latter evolved into the Prinzengroße (prince-sized) decorations which during WW I were favored by certain members of nobility in items such as Iron Crosses and even flight badges. Having given a bit of background on Kinder Swords, it is time to describe the item being offered here.

What we have is a very unique Kinder or young Cadet Navy Officers Sword. It is faithful in most details to its larger counterpart. It has glass eyes in the lionshead and has double folding guards, one of which shows the crowned fouled anchor. The grip appears to be a yellowed enamel as opposed to ivory or walrus tusk and is gilt wire wrapped. There is a chip high on the grip near the lionshead, but it is not detractive to the overall sword. The scabbard is the proper leather and metal. There is a small chain that serves as the hanger from the two loops on the scabbard. The blade is not engraved but that is not uncommon in the smaller swords. It does bear hallmarking from WKC, which I find to be most interesting. The blade shows a fair amount of dirt and could stand a bit of cleaning. The length of the sword from the top of the lion to the tip of the scabbard is about 33". The blade measures 29" and the scabbard itself measures 29 3/8".

This is the first time that I have seen an example such as this -- it would make a fine companion to a full-sized Navy Sword or Dagger. $895.00

 

 

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07-53 KINDER SWORD WHICH IS DOUBLE ENGRAVED AND PERSONALIZED FOR A BRAUNSCHWEIG FUßILIER REGIMENT. This is a more classic example of a Kinder Sword as it is a good bit smaller (and would have consequently belonged to a younger boy). It measures about 27" in length and has a dulled point to prevent injury to overly enthusiastic youngsters while playing. It features a basket guard and comes from a young noblemen from Braunschweig. The grip is sharkskin-wrapped, which in turn is gilt wire wrapped. The scabbard is nickel-plated and has two scabbard loops. The blade is quite elaborate for a Kinder Sword and is double engraved and personalized with the name Wilhelm Nafs. Perhaps some research will allow the new owner to find out what became of this young nobleman.

A very nice sword that is as high quality as I have seen in Kinder Swords. Very attractive--would be nice contrast in a sword collection. $795.00

 

 

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22-86 MINIATURE SWORD FROM CHINA. This is a most-interesting miniature sword produced in China around (approximately) 1900. The sword’s overall length in its scabbard is 11 11/16." When drawn from the scabbard, the sword measures 10 11/16" from pommel to tip. The sword’s blade is plain, except for some Chinese characters that appear below the handle. They may very well be its maker’s marks. Its pommel (sword top) is simple and unadorned. Its style is what I would describe as "free form." As we move down the grip, we see it is wrapped in what appears to be tightly woven chainmail. Both sides of the grip display some enamel shapes that appear to be flowers and leaves. Three of the four designs feature multicolored enamel work. Its rather narrow cross-guard appears to be made of "paktong." [Interestingly, "German silver" was created in an attempt to duplicate paktong, a Chinese metal alloy used in jewelry-making]. The sword’s locket (the metal fitting that bears a carrying ring or stud for wearing the sword) and chape (a metal tip that protects the blade's point), as well as three trim pieces, are also made of paktong. More of the tightly woven chainmail appears among the three trim pieces. More of the enamel designs noted on the grip are mounted in these three sections.
These designs are very attractively done and of the highest quality. In fact, all of the workmanship is topnotch. A miniature sword like this was very attractive to Germans visiting China and provided a fine keepsake from their visit to the ancient country. It is a very well made, attractive, and unusual sword, especially if you are interested in the German Colonial Period of 1890-1914. $295.00

 

 

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07-100 MINIATURE OF THE SWORD OF OTTO von BISMARCK. This is a miniature of the sword carried by the "Iron Chancellor," Otto von Bismarck. If you look closely, you will see his family’s coat-of-arms. The blade is plain. Overall, this sword, which measures 7 1/2" in length, is in fine condition. This would make a super desk piece.

Or as the original owner may have done, you can open letters with it. $150.00.

 

 

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07-62 MINIATURE LION HEAD SWORD. Miniature swords were very popular with the officers of Imperial Germany. They were used as desk pieces and even as letter openers. This example is a miniature of a lion’s head officer’s sword. I t comes complete with a metal scabbard. It is 8 3/8" long.

The blade is fullered and not engraved. $175.00. . .

 

 

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07-110 PATRIOTIC MINIATURE BAYONET. I rarely find miniature bayonets in such fabulous condition and of such superior quality. The bayonet measures 9 1/4" from the top of its dove-shaped handle to the tip of its scabbard. Abundant bright work is present, as well as a black Bakelite grip. The black-painted scabbard measures 6." The scabbard boasts a handsome, silver, Hohenzollern Crown. Below that appears a green oak leaf-decorated 1914 Iron Cross. When removed from the scabbard, the bayonet measures 8 3/4" in length.

The blade has a brilliant finish. $295.00  

 

 

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07-00 IOD 89 MINIATURE SWORD. This is a miniature version of the well known Infantry Officer Degen Model 1889 which was the classic sword of the German Army. This example is some 5' long and does not have a scabbard.

Would make a handsome display on your desk or use it as a letter opener. $150.00

 

 

 

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07-23 MINIATURE SWORD. Imperial German Naval, has the fouled anchor and a plain blade. The scabbard is painted black and gilt. About 50% of the black paint remains.

Bargain priced. $265.00

 

 

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07-159 MINIATURE SWORD DESK PIECE (NON IMPERIAL GERMAN). This is a very high-quality miniature sword that can be used as a desk piece or letter opener. The sword measures 9 1/4" in length. An intricate basket surrounds the grip, and the word "Toledo" appears just below its guard. It is NOT Imperial German, nor do we know its age, although it is probably 20th Century. It still makes a handsome desk piece or a letter opener.
$75.00
 

 

 

 

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07-112 XMK ARTILLERY LIONSHEAD OFFICER SWORD. This is a consignment item. It is an officer’s sword, dating from after 1907-1908. The sword is the classic, ever-popular Lionshead sword prized by collectors. The sword is 37 ½" long from the top of the lion’s head to the tip of the scabbard. It also measures 31 3/4" long from the top of the lion’s head to the blade tip. The sword handle is manufactured from Bakelite. It is triple-wire-wrapped. The Lionshead sports two red glass eyes. Crossed cannons can be seen on either side of the cross bar. The blade is plain and very attractive. It is hallmarked for WK&C. The scabbard is painted black.

The sword is in fine condition.$795.00 Reduced to $500.00!!

 

 

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Sword Belts, Portepees, & Bayonets

 

07-130 OFFICER PORTEPEE - BRAUNSCHWEIG. This is an UNISSUED officer’s portopee for a sword from the Duchy of Braunschweig. It was correct for officers in Infanterie-Regiment Nr 92, Husaren-Regiment Nr 17, and Braunschweig’s single artillery battalion. The portepee is in spectacular condition, primarily because it remains how its workshop originally prepared it. It is neatly folded over one time, with yellow thread wrapped around it. The leather is supple and fresh. It sports three rows of golden stitching. The portepee’s acorn is made of brilliant golden bullion, with a blue woven interior. This almost impossible-to-find accouterment is in very fine condition.

It would make a great display. If you have a Braunschweig officer’s sword, it would look fantastic mounted on it. $795.00

 

 

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07-142 OFFICER’S PORTEPEE - BAVARIA. This is a fine officer’s portepee from the Kingdom of Bavaria. The portepee has silver bullion tape that forms the attachment to the sword. Inlaid on the silver tape are four thin blue trim lines that identify it as Bavarian. The portepee’s acorn (bulb) is also made of silver bullion. Its blue center further identifies the portopee as Bavarian. The portepee is in excellent condition.

It is a highly-sought-after accessory to complete a Bavarian officer’s sword. $225.00

 

 

 

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07-143 ENLISTED MAN/NCO’S SWORD PORTEPEE - KOMPAGNIE Nr 3 - UNTEROFFIZIER SCHOOL. This sword portepee is correct for an enlisted man/NCO from the Unteroffizier School. Two yellow portions with a light red stripe in the middle appear below the attachment where the portopee is tied to the sword.

Its overall condition is reasonable, although the red and yellow reveal some obvious fading. $150.00

 

 

 

 

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07-144 UNIDENTIFIED ENLISTED MAN/NCO’S SWORD PORTEPEE. This is a portepee for an enlisted man/NCO which I cannot identify. Portions that are colored blue (faded), red, and dark-blue appear, in descending order, below the attachment where the portepee is tied to the sword. [If anybody can help me identify the portopee, I would be most grateful].

While the portepee’s bottom portion is complete, the tape portion where the portopee is attached show shredding in several places. $95.00

 

 

 

 

 

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07-145 UNIDENTIFIED ENLISTED MAN/NCO’S SWORD PORTEPEE. This is a portepee for an NCO/enlisted man which I cannot identify. Everything is all white below the attachment where the portopee is tied to the sword. [If anybody can help me identify the portopee, I would be most grateful]. The tape portion where the portepee attaches is made of leather.

 It shows substantial use and wear. $95.00

 

 

 

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07-161 UNISSUED NCO’S PORTEPEE - KOMPAGNIE Nr 6 - INFANTERIE OR FUß-ARTILLERIE OR EISENBAHN REGIMENTS OR PIONIER-BATTALIONS OR LUFTSCHIFFER-ABTEILUNGS. This is an NCO’s unissued portepee from Battalion Nr 3, Kompagnie Nr 6 within an Infanterie, Fuß-Artillerie, or Eisenbahn Regiment, a Pionier-Battalion, or a Luftschiffer-Abteilung. These portepees were worn on NCO’s bayonets as a sign of their rank. The white strap is doubled over and held in place by white thread. White tassels hang down from the portepee’s red-capped acorn, which has a red handle extending all the way to the strap. It certainly would complete a bayonet display for any of the previously-mentioned units. $250.00

 

 

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07-162 UNISSUED NCO PORTEPEE - KOMPAGNIE Nr 3 - INFANTERIE OR FUß-ARTILLERIE OR EISENBAHN REGIMENTS OR PIONIER-BATTALIONS OR LUFTSCHIFFER-ABTEILUNGS. This is an NCO’s unissued portepee from Battalion Nr 1, Kompagnie Nr 3 within an Infanterie, Fuß-Artillerie, or Eisenbahn Regiment, a Pionier-Battalion, or a Luftschiffer-Abteilung. These portepees were worn on NCO’s bayonets as a sign of their rank. The white strap is doubled over and held in place by white thread. White tassels hang down from the portepee’s yellow-capped acorn, which has a white and yellow handle extending all the way to the strap. It certainly would complete a bayonet display for any of the previously-mentioned units. $250.00

 

 

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07-86 OFFICER'S PORTOPEE - MECKLENBURG-SCHWERIN. This is a first-rate example of a portopee for an officer from the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. This would be a fine addition to a sword for a Grenadier, Infantry, Dragoon, or Artillery officer.

This is the first of these we have ever offered. $325.00 . . .

 

 

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07-120 PORTOPEE - OFFICER'S SWORD - BAVARIA. This is a top-quality Bavarian officer’s sword portopee. The portopee is nearly mint. It features silver and blue bullion tape where the portopee was attached to the sword’s grip. Its acorn is also silver, with a blue center. This makes for an excellent sword accessory.

It completes a sword quite handsomely. $225.00

 

 

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07-153 PORTOPEE. I have had this portopee in a desk drawer for years. I cannot identify it. I will let the photos speak for themselves. Perhaps one of our sword experts can help us better describe it! (Any assistance is DEEPLY appreciated). [As often is the case in life, ask and ye shall receive. I have learned from a sharp-eyed reader that this is a 1902 U.S. Army Model 1902 portopee that was used prior to WW I from 1902 to 1912. Thank you to ZH from Massachusetts. Great area except for their baseball team. Sorry, ZH, I just could not resist!  I DO thank you again for the helping hand]. $95.00

 

 

 

 

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07-136 BROWN LEATHER BELT - SWORD HANGER. This is a simple brown leather belt with the hanger necessary for attaching a sword. When buckled to its widest notch, the belt measures 48" in diameter. At its shortest, it measures 38." It measures 3/4" in width. The sword’s gilt-toned hanger hangs down from its left side.

Both the leather and all the hardware are in excellent condition.
$295.00

 

 

 

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07-155 SWORD BELT. This is a complete sword belt. The belt’s exterior is gold bullion, while its reverse is red Moroccan leather. The exterior hardware for the buckles is also gold-toned and oval-shaped. Hanging down from the belt is a fabric extension on which holds the hardware for hanging the sword. The belt is in very fine condition. $250.00

 

 

 

 

 

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07-152 SWORD BELT WITH SWORD HANGER ATTACHMENT AND SWORD HANGER. This is a brocade belt used for a sword. The belt’s red felt backing shows extensive mothing. The belt sports high-quality leather fittings. It is complete and ready, including the sword hanger. This is a full rig ready to be hung with a sword. $425.00

 

 

 

 

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07-137 SWORD BELT AND HANGERS. Collectors accumulate swords in a number of ways. Some collect the sword to display it alone. Others like to have all of the sword’s associated accessories, including portopees and sword belts. Some go all the way, using complete mannequins upon which they mount the proper uniform and headdress, and add belts, sashes, sword belts, and swords to show what the soldier looked like when he was "geared-up." Today we are offering a sword belt that is primarily red in color. The fabric shows significant wear, with patches where the red is missing and reveals the base fabric. The belt measures 45 ½" when fully extended and 35" when it is totally cinched in. What hangs down from this belt is most interesting. A simple hook appears upon which one could hang a sword. In addition, another leather belt extends down from the first, with twin gilt lions mounted on it. They look similar to the lions we see on Navy belts however, in all fairness, I cannot claim this is a naval belt. I will leave that to the collector to decide. Behind the twin lions is a heavy-duty attachment that could hold a sword, keys, etc.

The metal piece here is black and marked D.R.G.M. $350.00

 

 

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07-124 BAYONET - CHINA. This is a bayonet that was used in China. The scabbard measures 11 3/4" in length. The bayonet measures 16 1/4" in length from handle top to blade tip.

The bayonet and scabbard have differing numbers. The bayonet is in very fine condition. $475.00

 

 

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07-156 BAYONET SUITABLE FOR MAUSER. This is a typical bayonet used by the German Army on their issued-Mauser rifles. Our example has both the bayonet and its scabbard. The bayonet’s length, when installed in the scabbard, is 20 ½." The bayonet has a wooden handle with two screws in it. The handle, which is one-hundred years-old (more or less), displays wonderful aging and/or toning. The handle measures 5 1/4" in length and the blade measures 14" in length. Stamped on the cross guard is "1920." The blade’s end opposite the tip reads "Schleutermann Remscheid." The blade’s edge displays a crowned "W" with the number "18 + 19."
It appears that the bayonet’s tip has been cut down so it is no longer sharp. It also was smoothed over so it is not jagged. This alteration was neatly done. You have to look twice to notice it. The blade’s surface is also a bit unusual. It is a bit rough and with patches that are not rust, however, they do cause the roughness. The scabbard measures 15" in length. It is metal. Its reverse has a peg from which the scabbard was attached to the frog on the soldier’s sword belt when the bayonet was not in use. The scabbard sports one dent down near its tip. The scabbard also displays the numbers "0.9381" and "0.7275." Overall, the scabbard’s condition is quite good. $195.00 

 

 

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Non Imperial German Edged Weapons

 

39-15 BOWIE KNIFE - CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA. This is a very rare Bowie Knife, which was manufactured in the Confederate States of America (CSA) during the Civil War. This very knife was featured on page 127 of the book "Confederate Arms."[A copy of the page will be included with the Bowie Knife when it is sold]. The Bowie Knife has a wooden handle. The handle measures 5." The blade measures 12 1/8," making the overall length of the knife 17 1/8." A scabbard is not included. Items from the CSA are always more prized than Union examples. This is especially true for any kind of Confederate edged weapon. Confederate officer’s swords are VERY expensive. (One of my favorite CSA swords is for naval officers. All of those were made in England and routinely sell for $20,000.00+). Confederate-made examples such as this were crudely-constructed when compared to their Northern counterparts. The South lacked both the resources and the manufacturers to produce finer weapons.

This piece almost screams "history!" It has been in my collection for many years. $3,295.00  

 

 

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Wooden Display Products (Helmet & Visor Stands)

Zeppelin & Balloon Memorabilia

Der Rittmeister Content Pages:


Click here for our Home Page
             

Click for the Order Information Page

Click here for Our Biography Page

Click here to Meet the Late Great Author & Painter Jack Hunter