Württemberg

Württemberg

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  1. 31-79 1818 PROCLAMATION INITIATING CROWN ORDER - WÜRTTEMBERG - KING WILHELM I.

    31-79 1818 PROCLAMATION INITIATING CROWN ORDER - WÜRTTEMBERG - KING WILHELM I.

    Regular Price: $150.00

    Special Price: $130.00

    This is a proclamation issued by König Wilhelm I of Württemberg. The proclamation is dated 23 September 1818. It announces the Kingdom’s establishment of the Order of the Crown. It is a printed copy of the proclamation, which was issued throughout the Kingdom. While not actually signed by Wilhelm I, it is authorized by him, by the Ordens Kanzler and State Minister Graf von Zeppelin. This was the father or uncle of the Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin who founded Germany’s airships. The document measures 9 1/4” x 7 1/4,” and is four pages long. Learn More
  2. 04-635 INFANTRY LINE-REGIMENT OFFICER PICKELHAUBE - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    04-635 INFANTRY LINE-REGIMENT OFFICER PICKELHAUBE - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $4,795.00

    Today we are offering a fine example of an infantry line-regiment officer’s pickelhaube from the Kingdom of Württemberg. This is a fine pre war example that would be appropriate for Infanterie-Regiment Nr’s 120, 121, 122, 124, 125, 126, 127, and 180. These eight regiments were among the ten Württemberg infantry regiments that existed prior to the big military expansion just before WW I. The helmet’s body is quite handsome, with a fine exterior finish. The leather is well-maintained, quite supple, and relatively problem-free. The left rear quarter shows one inch-long scratch. [Also, please note that its front visor is squared, which is quite unusual for an infantry helmet. Only Bavaria shared this trait]. All of the furniture is gilt, including the trim, wappen, chin scales, spike, officers’ stars, etc. The state and reich’s kokarden are present.

    Inside the helmet we find a fine leather sweatband, and a complete silk liner. The liner is light-copper in color. It is of the smooth variety (not seen as often as ribbed silk), which is complete but show some "running." All of the original hardware appears under the silk liner, with no signs of double holes where the wappen is attached. This is a well-put-together, very complete spiked helmet.

     Finding one this original and in such good condition is getting harder and harder.

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  3. 04-647 WÜRTTEMBERG ARMY ZAHLMEISTER PICKELHAUBE.

    04-647 WÜRTTEMBERG ARMY ZAHLMEISTER PICKELHAUBE.

    Regular Price: $2,695.00

    Special Price: $2,350.00

    The Zahlmeister (Paymaster) played an important role in every regiment. These officers and assistants handled the regiment’s payroll functions. A special box was entrusted to the Zahlmeister and his assistants, so that they could count out each regiment member’s pay on the appropriate day. Each man received his due, based on his rank and time in service.

    The helmet’s leather body sports a fine finish, overall. Some light spidering shows on one of the helmet’s rear quarters, but is of little consequence to the helmet’s overall condition. It sports the squared-front-visor traditional to Württemberg officers’ helmets. The helmet’s furniture, including the wappen, the cruciform, the (rounded) chin scales, the spike, and the trim, is all silver-toned. The wappen is especially handsome, with a fine, frosted-silver finish. The cruciform’s, pearl ring’s, and spike’s patinas are especially handsome. The officers’ stars, however, are gold (normal for a Zahlmeister’s pickelhaube, to show contrast).

    Inside the helmet, instead of a silk liner, we find the leather liner more commonly found on enlisted men/NCO’s liner. This spiked helmet is in excellent condition, with all its leather tongues present and the sizing thong attached.

    It is a lovely helmet, in amazing condition.

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  4. 04-372 OFFICER PICKELHAUBE FOR DRAGONER-REGIMENT Nr 25 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    04-372 OFFICER PICKELHAUBE FOR DRAGONER-REGIMENT Nr 25 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $6,295.00

    We are very pleased to be able to offer a fine example of an officer’s pickelhaube that would have been correct for Württemberg Dragoner-Regiment Nr 25. This was one of two dragoon regiments in the Kingdom of Württemberg’s army. This regiment was raised in 1813 and garrisoned at Ludwigsburg.

    The helmet has a pleasing leather body and the squared front visor typical for a dragoon regiment. The wappen and furniture for this helmet are silver, except for the officer’s stars and the chin scales, which are gilt. The wappen is particularly handsome, with a frosted finish and gentle toning. Württemberg’s Lion and Stag stand out most handsomely on this wappen, with the Württemberg Coat-of-Arms between them. The silver of the cruciform and spike are very attractive, with a superb patina. Both the state and reich’s kokarden are present. The Württemberg kokarde is quite similar in style, if not in color, to the Saxon kokarde. [ I particularly admire the helmet’s chin scales as they are set against the other silver fittings. They seem to jump out at the observer].

    Inside a gently-used leather sweatband and a green silk liner appear. Under the liner we see that this is a size "57" helmet. All of the fittings are in lovely condition under the silk liner, with no extra holes for the wappen’s installation.

    This is a very pleasing example of a difficult-to-find spiked helmet for a well known regiment.

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  5. 04-311 OFFICER PICKELHAUBE FOR TRAIN-ABTEILUNG - Nr 13 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    04-311 OFFICER PICKELHAUBE FOR TRAIN-ABTEILUNG - Nr 13 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $6,995.00

    This is an extra-fine example of a pickelhaube for an officer who served in Württemberg Train-Abteilung Nr 13. This detachment was the ONLY Train Battalion in the Kingdom of Württemberg’s army. It was raised in 1871 and garrisoned at Ludwigsburg. It was assigned to XIII. Armeekorps.

    Train Battalions were, of course, a late addition to the German Army, with the first battalions forming in the Prussian Army in 1853. By the time WW I began a total of twenty-two Train Battalions existed, of which seventeen were Prussian, two were Saxon, one was Baden, one Hessen, and one hailed from Württemberg. (I believe that you get the idea of this pickelhaube’s scarcity)! Even more important, this helmet is in extraordinary condition and is of the highest quality (for reasons of which we will learn later).

    Starting with the exterior, we see that the leather body is in stunning condition. The leather is supple with few blemishes and absolutely no problems. The helmet has a squared visor as opposed to the rounded one seen on most infantry helmets (with the exception of Bavaria and Württemberg, of course)! Furthermore, Württemberg was the only state to use a squared visor on its Train Battalion pickelhauben, which makes this example stand out all the more from other Train Battalion helmets. I might add that this is the first Train Battalion helmet I have ever offered. All of the furniture on this helmet is gilt, including the wappen, chin scales, spike, etc. The wappen is especially handsome. It has a fine frosted finish that catches the eye, hinting at this helmet’s splendor. The correct officer’s reich and state kokarden for Württemberg are in place.

    Inside the helmet we are treated to a white silk liner and white leather sweatband. This, of course, points to a royal personage. {I find it especially interesting that a person of this rank would be attached to a train battalion. More often royals and nobles were attached to cavalry or elite infantry regiments (just another curiosity, I suppose). I don’t have access to a Rangeliste that shows the officers of Battalion Nr 13. It would be interesting to do a bit of research and get a sense of who might have owned this spectacular helmet.} Peeking under the silk liner we see that there are no extra holes. All of the hardware matches and is ORIGINAL to the helmet.

    This is, plain and simple, a superbly conditioned spiked helmet that was worn by a special officer in a single battalion. I do not get many helmets from Württemberg (I am always looking for them)! Of the four kingdoms (Bavaria, Prussia, Saxony, and Württemberg) it is by far the most difficult for me to find, even though I have many excellent contacts who live in the modern German state of Baden-Württemberg.

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  6. 33-290 SHAKO TO A ONE YEAR VOLUNTEER IN THE MOUNTAIN OR "SNOW" TROOPS - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    33-290 SHAKO TO A ONE YEAR VOLUNTEER IN THE MOUNTAIN OR "SNOW" TROOPS - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    Regular Price: $3,995.00

    Special Price: $3,495.00

    The Mountain or "Snow" troops of the Kingdom of Württemberg were considered very elite troops. Their numbers were relatively small. This shako is for a one-year-volunteer in that unit. This black shako is made of a higher quality of leather than one would see in a traditional enlisted man’s shako. The same is true for the Württemberg field badge, which is present. It is more consistent with NCO quality headgear. The condition of the leather body is generally good, with the leather remaining supple throughout. On either side and the rear of the shako there are some depressions in the leather. On the right side there is what I would term a small depression. A fine quality silver wappen is in the center of the shako. This consists of a starburst with the motto of Württemberg and what appears to be a likeness of the Württemberg Crown Order. The chinscales are also silver, and I do mean silver. They have a wonderful patina. I love it when I find chinscales like this that show a fine patina, with even decades of grime between each scale. This confirms to us that this helmet is untouched and in its original form. There are no Kokarden. The field badge, which is inserted at the top and front of the shako, is in mint condition. The outer portion is black and the inner is red. The interior of this helmet is a leather tongue type with a small cord spliced through each tongue to draw them together. Thus, it would float on top of the wearer’s head and keep the head from making contact with the top of the shako. There are some markings in the top of the shako. These markings consist of one very plain marking of "VoB," and another partial stamping that is the same. I cannot say what this means. I would remind the reader that "berg" in German means "mountain." Also Generalfeldmarschall Erwin Rommel the famed "Desert Fox" of WW II was from Württemberg and served in the Mountain Troops. As a young Hauptmann fighting against the Italians he was awarded the Orden Pour le Mérite and went on to become arguably Germany's best known and finest commander during WW II.

    A very rare and desirable shako.

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  7. 05-1444 KÖNIG WILHELM II SILVER SERVICE MEDAL - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    05-1444 KÖNIG WILHELM II SILVER SERVICE MEDAL - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    Regular Price: $175.00

    Special Price: $150.00

    This is the Silver Service Medal from the Kingdom of Württemberg. It is a civil decoration. This variation features a star under the King’s likeness, as well as a star on the reverse under the words "For Service." The decoration measures 1" in diameter. It shows König Wilhelm II of Württemberg’s profile. It comes with a short length of black and red ribbon. Learn More
  8. 15-562 COMPLETE DRESS TUNIC - GENERALMAJOR - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    15-562 COMPLETE DRESS TUNIC - GENERALMAJOR - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $8,995.00

    THIS COLLECTION ITEM IS ON A RESERVED HOLD!!!

    It has been some time since I have offered you a general officer’s tunic. Once you have read the following description, I believe you will agree that the wait has been well worth it. Earlier this year I offered a very fine tunic from the Kingdom of Württemberg. I was quite pleased with it. Fortunately, the very same collector recently offered me another even more exciting Württemberg general’s tunic, which I am about to describe.

    Our offering today is a prewar dunkel-blau (dark-blue) tunic, from not too long before the conversion to wartime feldgrau occurred. The tunic is of the highest-quality and in astonishingly good condition. It has only one tiny little moth nip and a slight sign of wear to its bottom edge. A total of twelve gold-toned buttons runs down its center. Attached to the top two buttons of the tunic is a sumptuous general’s aiguillette. It is a VERY rare accessory indeed that we seldom find attached to a tunic. The tunic sports a set of horizontal sewn-in loops suitable for a ribbon or medal bar. The loops measure 5" wide. Another set of vertical sewn-in loops is present, and probably held a pinback decoration or possibly a breast star. The cuffs are red, with a gold bullion leitzen and two gold-toned buttons on each cuff. The collar is red. Each side again sports the gold bullion leitzen emblematic of a general officer. It boasts absolutely superb generalmajor’s epaulettes. Each displays the red and black threads that confirm they hail from the Kingdom of Württemberg. They are in beautiful condition. The tunic’s reverse reveals a total of six more (three to a side) gold-toned buttons on the vent flap. [The left vent flap is also where we find the one teen-eintsy moth nibble]. Its interior is every bit as sumptuous as the exterior. It possesses a fine black silk liner with a small, inner breast pocket (but, alas, no evidence of the owner’s name). Included with the tunic is a superior Württemberg officer’s brocade sash, portopee-like tassels and all, once again sporting Württemberg’s red and black color scheme on a silver bullion background.

    This is an excellent opportunity to acquire a COMPLETE general officer’s tunic from an infrequently seen German state. Württemberg tunics are available far less often than those from Prussia. (I see Württemberg tunics even less frequently than Bavarian or Saxon). Please enjoy this. It is a great pleasure for us to share it with you!

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  9. 15-551 ÜBERROCK - GENERAL der INFANTERIE À LA SUITE - GRENADIER-REGIMENT KÖNIG KARL (5. WÜRTTEMBERGISCHES) Nr 123 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    15-551 ÜBERROCK - GENERAL der INFANTERIE À LA SUITE - GRENADIER-REGIMENT KÖNIG KARL (5. WÜRTTEMBERGISCHES) Nr 123 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $2,995.00

    The überrock was a frock coat (longer in length than a conventional tunic) that was used until 1910 (approximately) when it was phased-out by tunics. At first glance it looks like a pre WW I dark-blue tunic. Instead of ending at or near the midriff however, it continues to the knee area. In any event, it is a much longer tunic.

    Today we are offering an überrock from Grenadier-Regiment König Karl (5. Württembergisches) Nr 123. The regiment was founded in 1799. It was garrisoned at Ulm and attached to Württemberg’s ArmeeKorps XIII. This überrock is quite simple. Its body is dark blue. A double row of five (ten-total) gilt buttons run down its center. (Its reverse boasts four more large gilt buttons at the vent flap). Its collar is red and red material trims its cuffs. Its second buttonhole sports a prinzengroße-sized Iron Cross ribbon. As the tunic is clearly pre 1910 (indeed, it is from much earlier), the ribbon is for an 1870 Iron Cross 2nd Class. I have saved the best detail for last. Its shoulder boards are for a General der Infanterie! The shoulder boards show that the silver bullion areas’ chevrons are red and black, confirming that they belonged to a Württemberg general. Next, we see the two rank pips that indicate a General der Infanterie. You will note they are silver, although the silver wash has disappeared from several small places, revealing the underlying brass. In their centers is König Karl’s crowned, royal cypher. He was Grenadier-Regiment König Karl (5. Württembergisches) Nr 123's patron. Inside the coat is a fine, black, silk liner. No ownership tag is present, but it does show (unsurprisingly) that the coat was produced in Stuttgart by Gustav Rörer. The firm was a noted purveyor to Württemberg’s royal household. [From some quick research, we found that Herzog Wilhelm Nikolaus was a General der Infanterie à la Suite officer to the regiment. The information came from several Ranglistes from before and after König Wilhelm II’s time]. The überrock’s exterior is generally pleasing. Some scattered moth nips appear, which are not detractive. The largest is near the Iron Cross ribbon. Also, a repair was made to a seam on the überrock’s back. [We will highlight these areas in the accompanying photographs]. The seam let go and was re-sewn from the outside, instead of removing the lining. Nevertheless, the erstwhile tailor did a tidy job.

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  10. 15-443 LEUTNANT ULANKA - FULL PARADE CONFIGURATION - ULANEN-REGIMENT Nr 19 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    15-443 LEUTNANT ULANKA - FULL PARADE CONFIGURATION - ULANEN-REGIMENT Nr 19 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $3,895.00

    This is a leutnant’s ulanka from Ulanen-Regiment König Karl (1. Württ.) Nr 19. The regiment was founded in 1683. It was garrisoned at Ulm-Wiblingen, where it was attached to the XIII. ArmeeKorps, which consisted of mostly Württemberg regiments. The regiment was the senior of the two Württemberg Ulanen-Regiments. [The second of the two regiments from Württemberg was Ulanen-Regiment König Wilhelm I. (2. Württ.). It was not established until 1809. It was garrisoned at Ludwigsburg, where it was also attached to the XIII. ArmeeKorps].

    The ulanka has a dark-blue body, with a double row of seven (fourteen total) silver buttons. The collar features massive silver bullion leitzen, which display a lustrous patina. The sleeves are red. Each sleeve sports a single silver bullion leitzen. On this leitzen is mounted a small silver button. The epaulettes are the dress version of shoulder boards, and resemble banjos, hence their nickname, "Banjo Boards." Each of the epaulettes has a silver frame and König Karl of Württemberg’s gilt, crowned royal cypher. These epaulettes are of the slip-on variety. Each displays a small silver button. One of the very important and attractive features of the ulanka is that it comes complete with the red parade plasteron. This attachment is V-shaped. It buttons onto the tunic’s front and is secured by the fourteen silver buttons. The contrast of the red plasteron against the dark-blue tunic is quite striking. It matches the sleeves in a most handsome manner. The tunic ‘s reverse features red piping, with a total of ten, large, silver buttons in the vent area serving as decoration. The tunic’s interior reveals a fine, black, silk liner. Some scattered moth nips appear on the tunic, mostly on the front and toward the bottom on both sides. There is also a period repair on the reverse.

    It has a bit more mothing than we normally prefer, but this does not detract from the tunic’s overall beauty. It is such an elite regiment. It was THE oldest Ulanen-Regiment in the entire German Army!

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  11. 15-401 ULANKA PARADE PLASTERON - ULANEN-REGIMENT Nr 11, ULANEN-REGIMENT Nr 15, OR ULANEN-REGIMENT Nr 20 - PRUSSIA AND WÜRTTEMBERG.

    15-401 ULANKA PARADE PLASTERON - ULANEN-REGIMENT Nr 11, ULANEN-REGIMENT Nr 15, OR ULANEN-REGIMENT Nr 20 - PRUSSIA AND WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $795.00

    This is a lemon-yellow, parade plasteron, which was correct for Ulanen-Regiment Graf Haesler (2. Brandenburgisches) Nr 11. The regiment was founded in 1860 and garrisoned at Saarburg. It was assigned to the XXI. ArmeeKorps. It also was correct for Schleswig-Holsteinsches Ulanen-Regiment Nr 15. The regiment was founded six years later, in 1866. It also was garrisoned at Saarburg and assigned to the XXI. ArmeeKorps. In addition it would be correct for Ulanen-Regiment König Wilhelm I. (2. Württ.) Nr 20. This regiment was founded in 1809 and was garrisoned at Ludwigsburg. It was attached to XIII ArmeeKorps. A plasteron is an additional attachment that fits over an ulanka’s chest for dress or parade functions. A total of fourteen buttons and five clips appear on its reverse to attach it to the tunic. It is an extremely difficult-to-find uniform accessory. A plasteron truly completes an ulanka.

    Our example is in excellent condition.

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  12. 15-74 PAPER WEIGHT WITH MINIATURE OF OFFICER DRESS SHOULDER BOARD OF INFANTERIE-REGIMENT Nr 126 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    15-74 PAPER WEIGHT WITH MINIATURE OF OFFICER DRESS SHOULDER BOARD OF INFANTERIE-REGIMENT Nr 126 - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $250.00

    Desk pieces of all kinds were very popular in Imperial Germany. This was especially true for officers who might have miniature swords as decorations or as letter openers, for example. In this case an officer from 8. Württemberg Infanterie-Regiment Nr 126 Große Herzog Friedrich von Baden had a paperweight made with a miniature of a dress (banjo style) shoulder board imbedded in glass.

    The result is a very striking desk piece that is a real attention getter.

    Imagine how handsome this would look on your desk (as it will on mine until you buy it)!

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  13. 15-586 OFFICER’S BROCADE DRESS BELT - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    15-586 OFFICER’S BROCADE DRESS BELT - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $550.00

    This Kingdom of Württemberg officer’s brocade belt is in good condition. Its silver bullion brocade features small, double, red and black tracks, which indicate Württemberg. The buckle has a silver finish and sports Württemberg’s King Wilhelm II’s royal cypher. Inside the belt we see a dark-blue liner. This is a smaller-sized belt in very fine condition, overall.

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  14. 15-548 OFFICER’S DRESS SASH - STORAGE CARTON - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    15-548 OFFICER’S DRESS SASH - STORAGE CARTON - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $375.00

    This is an officer’s dress sash from Württemberg in superb condition. Such a sash was worn about the waist. It has a bullion belt with all the attachments needed for proper sizing. Imbedded in the silver bullion are red and black trim lines, which are the Kingdom of Württemberg’s key colors. Hanging down from the belt are two large "acorns," similar to what one finds on a sword’s portopee, only larger. Dangling from the acorn’s bottom are plentiful silver, red, and black bullion tassels. Each tassel thread measures approximately 9 1/2" in length. A sash like this really sets off an officer’s uniform. The sash is housed in a correct period storage carton. The carton has rounded ends and measures 15" x 3 1/2" x 3." It is made of sturdy, heavy-duty cardboard that sports a leatherette exterior. While the carton has received some scuffs over the last one-hundred-years, it is in amazingly good condition.

    The sash is also in excellent condition, with some normal, expected toning (patina) to the belt’s bullion.

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  15. 33-291 LINE-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT ONE-YEAR-VOLUNTEER’S KUGELHELM - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    33-291 LINE-ARTILLERIE-REGIMENT ONE-YEAR-VOLUNTEER’S KUGELHELM - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $3,495.00

     This is a Württemberg Line-Artillerie-Regiment One-Year-Volunteer’s Kugelhelm.  Although we have explained the One-Year-Volunteer (OYV) program in the past, now is a good time to review it.  Imperial Germany required two years of compulsory military service from its young men.  After their two years of service, the men were transferred to the reserves where they remained for quite some time.  Under the normal two-year enlistment, the men were provided with all the necessary clothing, headdresses, food, housing, etc., which they drew from the military depot.  They could choose to accept these items, or they could privately purchase any gear that they wished on their own. 
    The special OYV program generally was used by young, middle-class men whose families did NOT have a longstanding military service tradition. They usually came from money, but (usually) were not members of nobility (we currently are offering a Saxon Graf’s OYV attila).  The OYV enlistees were REQUIRED to buy their clothing and other gear, and had to pay for their own food and housing as well.  In return, the army allowed OYV’s a certain flexibility in their uniforms’ and headdresses’ appearance.  They often purchased their tunics from the same supply stores as did the officers.  Their shoulder straps were identical to regular enlisted men/NCO’s, except for a special rope-like trim of alternating colors that immediately identified them as OYV’s.


    The OYV’s pickelhauben and kugelhelme were allowed to be almost the same as an officer’s, with the proviso that one key element was the same as the enlisted men/NCO’s.  The helmet that we are offering today has several elements that belong to an officer rather than an enlisted man/NCO.  The most immediately obvious is its wappen, which is purely that of an officer.  We also can tell its status by the voided (open) crowns and gorgeous frosting (the Württemberg Lion and Stag stand out beautifully).  Its pearl ring (an attachment directly above its base) is another officer’s type of accessory.  Two other features are NOT those of an officer, rendering the helmet correct for an OYV.  The first attribute is its two kokarden. The second is that it sports enlisted men/NCO’s lugs on its base where the kugel is attached, rather than four officers’ stars.


    Its officer’s-style interior boasts a high-quality, light-brown sweatband that is in top condition. The silk liner is dark-champagne in color. (I am particularly fond of its smooth appearance,  which is less common than the ribbed variety).  All of its original hardware is in place under that silk liner, along with the all-important ABSENCE of double holes where the wappen is attached. Finally, we see that it is a size “54" helmet.
    This kugelhelm is in splendid condition.  It is scarcer than an officer’s kugelhelm, because fewer OYV’s than officers were present in any regiment.

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  16. 02-393 THREE-PLACE FRACK BAR HIGHLIGHTED BY WÜRTTEMBERG KNIGHT’S CROSS 2nd CLASS WITH SWORDS

    02-393 THREE-PLACE FRACK BAR HIGHLIGHTED BY WÜRTTEMBERG KNIGHT’S CROSS 2nd CLASS WITH SWORDS

    $850.00

    This is a three-place “Frack Bar” highlighted by the Kingdom of Württemberg’s Friedrich Order Knight’s Cross 2nd  Class with Swords.  It is a marvelous three-place “Frack Bar.” [Two characteristics separate a frack bar from a medal bar. The first visually different feature is that the frack bar is set at a slight diagonal that generally skews from left-to-right. The second is that the medals are listed in importance from the right-to-left, rather than the medal bar’s more common left-to-right ranking.  Also remember that medal and frack bars typically begin with the Iron Cross 2nd Class]. 

    Going from right-to-left, the decorations on this “Frack Bar” are listed below.
    * 1914 Iron Cross 2nd Class - Prussia.

    * Knight’s Cross 2nd Class with Swords - Württemberg.

    The decoration was awarded from 1870 through 1918. It features a white enamel center displaying Friedrich’s gilt-crowned royal cypher.  A pair of crossed gilt swords is attached in two places on the medal’s top.  A single jump ring is then attached to the swords’ center so that a medal/frack bar’s ribbon can be attached as needed.

    * Hindenburg Cross for Combatants with Swords.

    The award was authorized after Paul von HIndenburg’s 1930's-era death. It came in three classes: combatant’s, non combatant’s, and next-of-kin.

    The medals, the ribbons, and the bar itself are in excellent condition. 

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  17. 05-1654 WILHELMKREUZ ANLÄSSLICH DES 25 JÄHRINGEN  IN ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    05-1654 WILHELMKREUZ ANLÄSSLICH DES 25 JÄHRINGEN IN ORIGINAL PRESENTATION CASE - WÜRTTEMBERG.

    $195.00

    This is the Wilhelm Cross for König Wilhelm II of Württemberg’s  25th anniversary of assuming the throne. It was a civil decoration, but looks similar to the military’s Wilhelm Cross, which was issued with swords.  The decoration is bronze-toned.  It features the Württemberg crown at the top, Wilhelm’s royal cypher in the center, and 1915 at the bottom.  It is rather interesting to note (I do NOT have an answer) that his 25th year on the throne was actually in 1916.  For some reason they celebrated it early.  König Wilhelm II sat on Württemberg’s throne from 1891 into 1918. 
    Nothing is on its reverse. The shape of the cross is considered a variation of a “cross pattee.”


    The original yellow and black ribbon indicative of Württemberg is attached to the cross.  ITS reverse features a small black safety pin that extends through a rectangular metal piece.  The presentation case is actually a cardboard carton, which IS never-the-less  correct for how the decoration was awarded.  The case measures 3 5/8" x 2 3/8" x 5/8" and is blue in color. Embossed in silver on the front is “W. K.” for Wilhelmkreuz. 


    Inside the case we see a sticker has been applied. The Württemberg Coat-of-Arms is in its center. Above that we see “K. Münzamt Abt. Orden.” Below the  Coat-of-Arms we see “Stuttgart,” Württemberg’s capital, and also the home for K. O., the firm that produced the decoration. If KO sounds familiar, it is because it is found on many 1914 Iron Crosses 1st Class. KO was the primary firm that produced “issued” Iron Crosses during WW I. The bottom half of the case has a raised platform (if you will) in which the decoration is placed. It holds the decoration and displays it in a very tidy manner.


    This is the first civil Wilhelm Cross that I have been able to find.  We are very happy that we have it in the presentation case.  Both are in very fine condition.

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